Moor Pool

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Moor Pool
Garden Suburb
Houses in Moor Pool Avenue backing onto Moorpool - geograph.org.uk - 972461.jpg
Moor Pool is located in West Midlands county
Moor Pool
Moor Pool
Location within the West Midlands
OS grid referenceSP03034
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townBIRMINGHAM
Postcode districtB17
Dialling code0121
PoliceWest Midlands
FireWest Midlands
AmbulanceWest Midlands
EU ParliamentWest Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
West Midlands
52°27′46″N 1°57′15″W / 52.4627°N 1.9542°W / 52.4627; -1.9542Coordinates: 52°27′46″N 1°57′15″W / 52.4627°N 1.9542°W / 52.4627; -1.9542

Moor Pool (or Moorpool) is a 22.32 hectares (55.2 acres) garden suburb within the ward of Harborne, Birmingham, England.[1] It was designated a Conservation Area in July 1970,[2] which was raised by an Article 4(2) direction order in 2006.[3] A Conservation Area Character Appraisal and Management Plan was adopted in March 2012.[4]

History[edit]

Memorial plaque to John Sutton Nettlefold within Moorpool Hall
Moorpool Bowling Club clubhouse

The Moor Pool estate was established in 1907 by John Sutton Nettlefold,[5] who was part of the Guest Keen Nettlefold (GKN) family. It formed part of the Garden City concept, shared by George Cadbury in Bournville, to create low density housing with many interspersed green spaces, and community facilities. The estate was built with a community hall (complete with skittle alley and snooker tables), two tennis clubs, a bowling green, numerous allotments, and the Moor Pool (pond) itself; all of these facilities remain today for residents' use.[6]

The homes and buildings were designed by William Martin, an architect known for working with John Henry Chamberlain to build 41 of the Birmingham board schools (including the nearby Harborne Clock Tower / School Yard),[7] through their practice Martin & Chamberlain.

Moor Pool Heritage Trust[edit]

In 2014 the residential landlord of the estate, Grainger plc planned to sell off the local amenities, including the hall, the bowling green, tennis courts, skittle alley, fishing pond, some open space and shops. The Moor Pool Heritage Trust made a deal with Grainger to acquire the community facilities for £325,000.[8] After a fundraiser, which included a £98,900 Heritage Lottery Fund grant, the acquisition was completed on 14 December 2014.[9][10]

Nettlefold Pocket Park[edit]

In 2016 it was announced that Moor Pool Heritage Trust had been awarded over £8,500 to create a pocket park[11] on an overgrown site on the corner of Margaret Grove and Moor Pool Avenue. The name Nettlefold Garden was chosen (after a naming competition), to reflect the heritage of the Moor Pool estate.[12] The park was officially opened to the public by Cllr Carl Rice, the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, on 21 May 2017.

Listed Buildings[edit]

Key[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX
Grade Criteria[13]
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest.
II Buildings of national importance and special interest.

Buildings[edit]

List Entry No Name and Location Photograph Date Architect Notes Grade
1075626 Harborne Tenants Estate Office
52°27′46″N 1°57′25″W / 52.462820°N 1.9570226°W / 52.462820; -1.9570226 (Harborne Tenants Estate Office)
Harborne Tenants' Estate Office The Circle.JPG c1907-10 Martin and Martin Brick and roughcast; tile roof. Two storeys, 5 bays with the central bay advanced and gabled. Ground floor with a 3-light window, a 2-light window with associated single-light window, an asymmetrically placed 2-light window, a 2-light window with associated single-light window and another 3-light window. First floor with an apparently altered door approached up steps, a 4-light window and a 3-light window. II
1076190 124–134, Ravenhurst Road
52°27′47″N 1°57′13″W / 52.463169°N 1.9535635°W / 52.463169; -1.9535635 (124-134, Ravenhurst Road)
124-134 Ravenshurst Road Harborne.JPG 1908 Martin and Martin An asymmetrical block of 6 flats. Red brick and roughcast: tiled roof. Two storeys; 3 flats wide, each with a projecting roughcast gabled bay with battered sides. In the projecting bays the recessed and arched entrances to the flats, those on the ground floor slightly below pavement level, those on the upper floor reached by bridges supported on exposed steel joists. All windows casements, those of the ground floor with segmental heads. II
1290669 Moor Pool Hall
52°27′46″N 1°57′24″W / 52.46290°N 1.9565957°W / 52.46290; -1.9565957 (Moor Pool Hall)
Entrance to Moorpool Hall - geograph.org.uk - 972371.jpg c1907-10 Martin and Martin An asymmetrical composition closing the vista down North Gate. Brick and roughcast, tiled roof. One and a half storeys; 8 bays. Mostly 3-light windows, some horizontal, others almost square and divided one from another by brick buttresses, and a double- door partly surrounded by glazing. In the roof 2 altered or later dormer windows. II
1343144 108–122, Ravenhurst Road
52°27′46″N 1°57′12″W / 52.46267°N 1.9534610°W / 52.46267; -1.9534610 (108-122, Ravenhurst Road)
108-122 Ravenshurst Road Harborne.JPG 1908 Martin and Martin An asymmetrical block of 8 flats. Red brick with some timber-cladding; tile roof. Two storeys; 4 flats wide, each with a projecting timber-clad bay, the 2 outer ones gabled, the 2 inner ones hipped roofed and with a timber-clad gabled dormer window in the roof between them. In the projecting bays, the entrances to the flats, those on the ground floor slightly below pavement level, those on the upper floor reached by steps. All windows casements, those of the ground floor flats with segmental heads. II
1343390 Post Office
52°27′46″N 1°57′23″W / 52.462649°N 1.9564194°W / 52.462649; -1.9564194 (Post Office)
25,26,26A and 27 The Circle Harborne.JPG c1907-10 Martin and Martin A symmetrical composition terminating the vista down Moor Pool Avenue. Brick and roughcast; tile roof. Two storeys; 5 bays with the central gabled bay higher and wider than the gabled 2nd and 4th bays. Ground floor with a single-light window, a shop front, 2 shop fronts with their doors set at angles to each other at the centre, another shop front and then another single-light window. First floor with a segment-headed 3-light window either side of a 6-light canted bay window on brackets. II

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Birmingham garden suburb could lose facilities". BBC News. Retrieved 15 February 2015.
  2. ^ "Moor Pool Conservation Area Designation Report" (PDF). Birmingham City Council. Retrieved 15 February 2015.
  3. ^ "Moor Pool Harborne Conservation Area". Birmingham City Council. Retrieved 15 February 2015.
  4. ^ "Moor Pool Conservation Area Character Appraisal and Management Plan". Birmingham City Council. Retrieved 15 February 2015.
  5. ^ "Moor Pool Estate saved after Heritage Lottery Fund grant". Birmingham Post. Retrieved 15 February 2015.
  6. ^ "Moor Pool Clubs, Societies and Associations". Moorpool Residents' Association. Retrieved 15 February 2015.
  7. ^ "The Clock Tower". Historic England. Retrieved 7 April 2017.
  8. ^ "Historic Moor Pool Hall in funding race for survival". Birmingham Post. 22 May 2014. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  9. ^ "Moor Pool Estate saved after Heritage Lottery Fund grant". Birmingham Post. 23 December 2014. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  10. ^ "Moor Pool Heritage Trust Acquires Community Facilities". Moorpool Residents Association. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  11. ^ "See where the six new mini parks planned for Birmingham will be". Birmingham Mail. 22 February 2016. Retrieved 5 April 2017.
  12. ^ "Moor Pool Duck Issue 89" (PDF). Moor Pool Residents' Association. April 2017. Retrieved 5 April 2017.
  13. ^ Listed Buildings, Historic England, retrieved 30 March 2015

External links[edit]