Moore County, North Carolina

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Moore County, North Carolina
MOORE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, CARTHAGE, MOORE COUNTY.jpg
Moore County Courthouse, in Carthage
Map of North Carolina highlighting Moore County
Location in the U.S. state of North Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded 1784
Named for Alfred Moore
Seat Carthage
Largest village Pinehurst
Area
 • Total 706 sq mi (1,829 km2)
 • Land 698 sq mi (1,808 km2)
 • Water 8.0 sq mi (21 km2), 1.1%
Population (est.)
 • (2017) 97,264
 • Density 126/sq mi (49/km2)
Congressional district 8th
Time zone Eastern: UTC−5/−4
Website www.moorecountync.gov

Moore County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 88,247.[1] Its county seat is Carthage[2] and its largest town is Pinehurst. It is a border county between the Piedmont and the Atlantic Coastal Plain.

In the early years the economy was dependent on agriculture and lumber. The lumber business expanded after railroads reached the area, improving access to markets. It lies at the northern edge of the area known as the Sandhills region, and developed resorts in the late 19th century, aided by railroads.

In the early 21st century Moore County comprises the Aberdeen-Pinehurst-Southern Pines, North Carolina Micropolitan Statistical Area. It is sometimes included in the Research Triangle and Greater Raleigh-Durham CSA.

History[edit]

Indigenous peoples occupied this area, with varying cultures over thousands of years. In the historic period that included European encounter, tribes included Algonquian speakers in the coastal area, with Siouan-speaking tribes in the border and Piedmont, and the Iroquoian-speaking Cherokee in the western mountains.

This area was settled by Highland Scots and descendants, who had migrated through the backcountry of Pennsylvania and Virginia. The county was formed in 1785, shortly after the American Revolutionary War, from part of Cumberland County. It was named after Alfred Moore, an officer in the American Revolutionary War and associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

In 1907 parts of Moore and Chatham counties were combined to form Lee County.

Moore County has many golf resorts in the Southern Pines/Pinehurst area, and hosted the 1996 and 2001 Women's U.S. Opens, as well as the 1999 and 2005 Men's U.S. Opens. The Women's Open returned to Southern Pines in 2007. In 2014, they consecutively hosted both the Women's and Men's Opens in the same year, a first in U.S. Open history.[3]

Celebrities who frequent or have private homes in the area include athletes Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, and Jack Nicklaus, and British actor Sean Connery. Past residents of the area have included Annie Oakley, Harvey Firestone, General George C. Marshall, and John D. Rockefeller.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 706 square miles (1,830 km2), of which 698 square miles (1,810 km2) is land and 8.0 square miles (21 km2) (1.1%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
17903,870
18004,76723.2%
18106,36733.6%
18207,12812.0%
18307,7458.7%
18407,9883.1%
18509,34217.0%
186011,42722.3%
187012,0405.4%
188016,82139.7%
189020,47921.7%
190023,62215.3%
191017,010−28.0%
192021,38825.7%
193028,21531.9%
194030,9699.8%
195033,1297.0%
196036,73310.9%
197039,0486.3%
198050,50529.3%
199059,01316.8%
200074,76926.7%
201088,24718.0%
Est. 201797,264[5]10.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[10] of 2010, there were 88,247 people, 34,625 households, and 21,959 families residing in the county. The population density was 107 people per square mile (41/km²). There were 44,468 housing units at an average density of 50 per square mile (19/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 82.8% White, 13.4% Black or African American, 0.9% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 2.20% from other races, and 0.88% from two or more races. 6.1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

By 2005 78.0% of the county population was non-Hispanic whites. 5.1% of the population was Latino. 14.8% of the population was African-American.

There were 30,713 households out of which 26.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.10% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.50% were non-families. 24.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the county, the population was spread out with 21.2% under the age of 18, 6.60% from 18 to 24, 25.80% from 25 to 44, 23.80% from 45 to 64, and 23.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 93.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $48,348, and the median income for a family was $48,492. Males had a median income of $31,260 versus $23,526 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,377. About 8.00% of families and 11.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.60% of those under age 18 and 10.10% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Map of Moore County, North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels

City[edit]

Towns[edit]

Villages[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

The county is divided into ten townships, which are both numbered and named:

  • 1 (Carthage)
  • 2 (Bensalem)
  • 3 (Sheffields)
  • 4 (Ritter)
  • 5 (Deep River)
  • 6 (Greenwood)
  • 7 (McNeill)
  • 8 (Sandhill)
  • 9 (Mineral Springs)
  • 10 (Little River)

Politics, law and government[edit]

Since the late 1960s and the civil rights movement and other cultural changes, Moore has become a supporter of Republican presidential candidates. The last Democrat to carry the county was Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964, and Jimmy Carter in 1980 was the last to reach forty percent of the vote. The Republican Party also dominates many local and state elections in majority-white precincts and districts.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 62.6% 30,490 33.5% 16,329 3.9% 1,873
2012 63.6% 29,495 35.6% 16,505 0.9% 415
2008 60.3% 27,314 38.9% 17,624 0.9% 390
2004 64.4% 24,714 35.3% 13,555 0.3% 113
2000 63.5% 19,882 35.9% 11,232 0.6% 187
1996 55.7% 14,760 37.2% 9,847 7.1% 1,872
1992 46.8% 12,448 36.3% 9,649 16.9% 4,494
1988 65.4% 14,543 34.4% 7,642 0.3% 63
1984 67.4% 14,681 32.4% 7,063 0.2% 38
1980 53.7% 10,158 42.8% 8,084 3.5% 669
1976 50.5% 7,577 49.1% 7,373 0.5% 70
1972 70.7% 9,406 27.3% 3,627 2.1% 275
1968 43.7% 5,322 29.5% 3,583 26.8% 3,263
1964 44.7% 5,162 55.3% 6,384
1960 51.2% 5,815 48.8% 5,548
1956 52.6% 5,238 47.5% 4,729
1952 51.8% 5,442 48.2% 5,066
1948 40.3% 2,719 49.5% 3,341 10.2% 690
1944 41.8% 2,663 58.2% 3,711
1940 37.4% 2,587 62.6% 4,330
1936 35.7% 2,481 64.3% 4,466
1932 36.2% 2,459 63.1% 4,287 0.7% 47
1928 55.5% 3,290 44.5% 2,639
1924 41.3% 1,974 57.9% 2,771 0.8% 38
1920 46.0% 2,279 54.0% 2,679
1916 43.5% 1,047 55.6% 1,337 0.9% 22
1912 11.9% 252 55.2% 1,167 32.9% 695

Moore County is a member of the regional Triangle J Council of Governments. In the North Carolina House of Representatives, Moore County lies chiefly in the 52nd District, represented by Republican Deputy Majority Whip James L. Boles Jr. The northwestern part of the county lies within the 78th District, which also covers the southeastern part of Randolph County and is represented by Republican Allen McNeill. In the North Carolina Senate, Moore County lies entirely within the 29th Senate District represented by Majority Whip Jerry W. Tillman.

The North Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention previously operated the Samarkand Youth Development Center (YDC), a correctional facility for delinquent girls, in Eagle Springs. The 60-acre (24 ha) complex first opened in 1918 and did not have a fence.[12]

Moore County Board of Commissioners

Attractions and places of interest[edit]

Notable residents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 27, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ 2014 US Open Championship
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015. Retrieved January 18, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 18, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 18, 2015. 
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 18, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved January 18, 2015. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-16. 
  12. ^ "Samarkand YDC" (Archive). North Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. April 28, 2006. Retrieved on December 16, 2015.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 35°19′N 79°29′W / 35.31°N 79.48°W / 35.31; -79.48