Morbier cheese

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Morbier
Morbier cheese two views.jpg
Country of originFrance
Region, townFranche-Comté, Morbier[1]
Source of milkCows[1]
PasteurizedDepends on variety
TextureSemi-soft
Fat content45%
Aging time45 days to 3 months
CertificationProtected Designation of Origin,[2] French AOC for both Morbier Jura and Morbier Doubs
Named afterMorbier
Related media on Wikimedia Commons

Morbier is a semi-soft cows' milk cheese of France named after the small village of Morbier in Franche-Comté.[3] It is ivory colored, soft and slightly elastic, and is immediately recognizable by the distinctive thin black layer separating it horizontally in the middle.[3] It has a yellowish, sticky rind.[2]

Description[edit]

The aroma of Morbier cheese is mild, with a rich and creamy flavour.[1] It has a semblance to Raclette cheese in consistency and aroma.[citation needed]

The Jura and Doubs versions both benefit from an appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC), though other non-AOC Morbier exist on the market.[citation needed]

Preparation[edit]

Traditionally, the cheese consists of a layer of morning milk and a layer of evening milk.[3] When making Comté, cheesemakers would end the day with leftover curd that was not enough for an entire cheese.[3] Thus, they would press the remaining evening curd into a mold, and spread ash over it to protect it overnight.[3] The following morning, the cheese would be topped up with morning milk.[3] The layer of ash is left in place in between the layers of milk.[1]

Today, it is typically prepared in factories and larger dairy cooperatives from one batch of milk, with the traditional ash line replaced by edible commercial vegetable ash.[1][3][4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Fletcher, J.; Pearson, V. (2011). Cheese & Wine: A Guide to Selecting, Pairing, and Enjoying. Chronicle Books LLC. p. 94. ISBN 978-1-4521-1149-0. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  2. ^ a b Cheese For Dummies. Wiley. 2012. p. 68. ISBN 978-1-118-14552-4. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Jenkins, S.W. (1996). Cheese Primer. Workman Publishing Company. p. 118-120. ISBN 978-0-89480-762-6. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  4. ^ Mademoiselle. Condé Nast Publications. 1982. p. 210. Retrieved 9 April 2021.

Further reading[edit]