Moreton Island National Park

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Moreton Island National Park
Queensland
IUCN category II (national park)
Moreton.png
Moreton Island National Park is located in Queensland
Moreton Island National Park
Moreton Island National Park
Nearest town or city Brisbane
Coordinates 27°03′09″S 153°23′28″E / 27.05250°S 153.39111°E / -27.05250; 153.39111Coordinates: 27°03′09″S 153°23′28″E / 27.05250°S 153.39111°E / -27.05250; 153.39111
Established 1966
Area 168 km2 (64.9 sq mi)
Managing authorities Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service
Website [<span%20class="url">.nprsr.qld.gov.au/parks/moreton-island/ Moreton Island National Park]
See also Protected areas of Queensland

Moreton Island National Park is a national park which covers 98% of Moreton Island in Queensland, Australia, 58 km northeast of Brisbane. It has three main townships, Bulwer, Cowan Cowan and Kooringal.

The island is home to Queensland's oldest operating lighthouse located at Cape Moreton on the northern tip of the island.[1] The township of Cowan was home to the Australian soldiers during WWII and many relics remain on the island. Access to the park was restricted during a clean-up of oil from the 2009 southeast Queensland oil spill.[2]

Activities such as bushwalking, fishing and watersports are popular in the park. Humpback whale can be seen in surrounding waters between late winter and spring.[1]

Fauna[edit]

The park contains mostly heath and open forests of scribbly gum and pink bloodwood. Other areas contain mangroves, sedge and melaleuca swamps.[1]

Access[edit]

Access to the island is via the MICAT vehicle ferry service from Lytton, near the Port of Brisbane, the Tangalooma Flyer launched from Pinkenba or the Kooringal Trader from Amity Point on North Stradbroke Island. The Combie Trader barge service from Scarborough in Redcliffe City to Bulwer no longer operates.

Camping[edit]

Camping is permitted in specified campsites as well as within zones along eastern and western beaches.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Explore Queensland's National Parks. Prahran, Victoria: Explore Australia Publishing. 2008. pp. 34–35. ISBN 978-1-74117-245-4. 
  2. ^ "Coast beaches re-open after spill". Brisbane Times. Fairfax Media. 21 March 2009. Retrieved 26 August 2010. 

External links[edit]