Morgan Carroll

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Morgan Carroll
Morgan Carroll 2016.jpg
Carroll in 2016
President of the Colorado Senate
In office
2013–2014
Preceded by John Morse
Succeeded by Bill Cadman
Member of the Colorado Senate
from the 29th district
In office
January 1, 2009 – January 11, 2017
Member of the Colorado House of Representatives
from the 36th district
In office
January 2005 – November 2008
Personal details
Born (1971-11-24) November 24, 1971 (age 45)
Denver, CO
Political party Democratic
Residence Aurora, Colorado[1]
Alma mater University of Colorado
Profession Attorney

Morgan Lenore Carroll (born November 24, 1971) is an American politician from Colorado and is currently the Chairwoman of the Colorado Democratic Party. A Democrat, Carroll represented Colorado House District 36 in the city of Aurora from 2004 to 2008, and she represented the state's 29th Senate district from 2009 to 2017.[2] Carroll served as President of the Colorado State Senate from 2013 to 2014 and as minority leader in 2015.[2] Carroll stepped down as minority leader in July 2015 to unsuccessfully run against incumbent Republican Mike Coffman for Colorado's 6th congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives.[3][4] In addition to her legislative work, Carroll works for the law firm of Bachus & Schanker.

Early life and education[edit]

Morgan Carroll was born November 24, 1971 in Denver, Colorado to John Carroll and Rebecca Bradley. Her father was a lawyer who served as a Colorado State Representative for Adams County between 1964 and 1974.[5] Her mother was an attorney and Carroll's partner at the mother/daughter disability and family-law firm Carroll & Bradley in Aurora from 2000 to 2010.[6]

When Carroll was young, she helped care for her father after he was diagnosed with Parkinson's, and later, Alzheimer's. Her family experienced financial difficulties during that time.[5]

Carroll graduated from Boulder High School in 1990. She worked various jobs, including at a gas station and fast-food restaurant, to pay for her education.[7][8] She graduated from the University of Colorado Denver in 1996 and from the University of Colorado Law School in 2000.[9]

Colorado State Legislature[edit]

Colorado House of Representatives[edit]

Carroll first ran for the Colorado House of Representatives District 36 in 2004, defeating Republican Jim Parker 55%-45%.[10] She won reelection in 2006 with 62% of the vote against Republican Brian R. Boney.[11]

Colorado State Senate[edit]

Carroll first ran for the Colorado State Senate District 29 in 2008, defeating Republican Suzanne Andrews 69%-31%.[12] She won re-election in 2012 with 59% of the vote, defeating Republican Bill Ross and Libertarian Michele Poague.[13]

Colorado State Senate District 29 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Morgan Carroll 30,149 58.75
Republican William “Bill” D. Ross II 18,745 36.53
Libertarian Michele R. Poague 2,420 4.72
Total votes 51,314 100

Tenure in the State Legislature[edit]

Carroll sponsored lobbying disclosure laws in 2006 and 2014.[7] During her first year in office, she refused to discuss legislative issues with lobbyists during debate, a practice that led them to complain about her to the Democratic leadership.[14] Her first bill, a workers compensation measure that would allow injured workers to choose their own doctors, was opposed by 240 lobbyists and ultimately failed, as did the other two bills Carroll submitted that year.[14]

She is considered an environmentalist,[15] and has been criticized by lobbyists for oil and gas companies.[16]

In 2013, Carroll and fellow Democratic Representative Rhonda Fields sponsored Colorado House Bill 1229, which mandates universal background checks for gun purchases in the state.[17]

Colorado State Senate Committee assignments[edit]

  • Senate Judiciary Committee (Chair)[18][19][20]
  • Executive Committee of the Legislative Council (Vice-Chair)[21]
  • Legislative Council (Vice-Chair)[22]
  • Senate Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Energy Committee[23]
  • Senate Health and Human Services Committee[24][25]
  • Police Officers and Firefighters Pension Reform Committee[26]
  • Redistricting Committee[27]

2016 U.S. Congress campaign[edit]

Carroll was the 2016 Democratic nominee in Colorado's 6th congressional district. She was defeated by incumbent Republican Representative Mike Coffman in the general election, in which she won 42% of the vote.[5][28] Carroll was endorsed by Democratic Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper,[2] Planned Parenthood, NARAL Pro-Choice America, EMILY's List, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, and the League of Conservation Voters.[5][29] A super PAC called Immigrant Voters Wins supported her, spending $10,000 as of September 2016.[30] Carroll raised the majority of her contributions from individual donors.[31]

Americans For Prosperity, the conservative advocacy organization backed by the Koch family, alleged that Carroll had conflicts of interest while serving in the state senate. The The Denver Post rated the claim somewhat true and wrote that AFP’s claim of a conflict of interest was not true in that Carroll had not benefited from the bill, but that the Colorado Ethics Board of the General Assembly had ruled that lawmakers should proactively disclose "potential" conflicts of interest.[32]

Ascension to the Colorado Democratic Party[edit]

After an unsuccessful campaign to become the next congressional representative for Colorado's 6th congressional district, Carroll shortly after announced her candidacy for the chairmanship of the Colorado Democratic Party. On March 11, 2017, Carroll was elected as the next Chairperson of the party.

Personal life[edit]

Carroll was briefly married and is now divorced.[14] Her longtime partner and former campaign manager, Mike Weissman, was a 2016 candidate for the Colorado House of Representatives.[7][14] Carroll is the author of Take Back Your Government: A Citizen's Guide to Grassroots Change (2011).[6][33]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Moreno, Ivan (October 10, 2013). "Aurora's Morgan Carroll new Colorado Senate president". Aurora Sentinel. AP. Retrieved September 30, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c AP (September 15, 2015). "Mike Coffman's Democratic challenger touts governor's backing". The Gazette. Colorado Springs. Retrieved September 30, 2015. 
  3. ^ Bartels, Lyn (July 9, 2015). "Democrat Lucia Guzman to become Senate minority leader". The Denver Post. Retrieved September 30, 2015. 
  4. ^ Sapin, Rachel. "Aurora Sen. Morgan Carroll will step down as senate minority leader". The Aurora Sentinel. Retrieved September 7, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d Sapin, Rachel (July 7, 2015). "State Sen. Morgan Carroll makes official her battle against Mike Coffman for Aurora's congressional seat". Aurora Sentinel. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Gardner, Natasha (October 2012). "The Contender: Could state Senator Morgan Carroll become Colorado’s first female governor?". 5280. Retrieved September 7, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c "State Sen. Morgan Carroll makes official her battle against Mike Coffman for Aurora's congressional seat - Aurora Sentinel". 2015-07-07. Retrieved 2016-09-23. 
  8. ^ "Colorado’s 10 most influential women". Denver Post. May 4, 2012. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  9. ^ "About Morgan". State Senator Morgan Carroll. Retrieved September 30, 2015. 
  10. ^ Official Publication of the Abstract of Votes Cast for the 2004 General Election (PDF) (Report). Office of the Colorado Secretary of State. p. 110. 
  11. ^ Official Publication of the Abstract of Votes Cast for the 2006 General Election (PDF) (Report). Office of the Colorado Secretary of State. p. 114. 
  12. ^ Official Publication of the Abstract of Votes Cast for the 2008 General Election (PDF) (Report). Office of the Colorado Secretary of State. p. 105. 
  13. ^ "2011-2012 Abstract of Votes Cast: General Election State Senate Results". Office of the Colorado Secretary of State. 
  14. ^ a b c d "The Contender". 2012-09-24. Retrieved 2016-09-23. 
  15. ^ "Environmentalists also upset over lobbyists email mistake". FOX31 Denver. 2013-01-26. Retrieved 2016-09-23. 
  16. ^ "Accidental email attachment lands lobbyist in hot water with Senate majority leader". The Spot. Retrieved 2016-09-23. 
  17. ^ Parker, Ryan (March 11, 2013). "Colorado gun bills: Universal background checks passed in Senate, heads to House". Retrieved September 7, 2016. 
  18. ^ "2010 Senate Judiciary". Colorado General Assembly. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  19. ^ "2011 Senate Judiciary". Colorado General Assembly. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  20. ^ "2012 Senate Judicial". Colorado General Assembly. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  21. ^ "2014 Executive Committee of the Legislative Council". Colorado General Assembly. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  22. ^ "2014 Legislative Council". Colorado General Assembly. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  23. ^ "2012 Senate Agriculture". Colorado General Assembly. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  24. ^ "2010 Senate Health and Human Services". Colorado General Assembly. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  25. ^ "2011 Senate Health". Colorado General Assembly. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  26. ^ "2011 Police Officers and Firefighters Pension Reform". Colorado General Assembly. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  27. ^ "Committee Information". Colorado General Assembly: Redistricting in Colorado. 
  28. ^ Murray, Jon (November 8, 2016). "Mike Coffman defeats Morgan Carroll in latest attempt by Democrats to win seat". The Denver Post. Retrieved 14 November 2016. 
  29. ^ Yachnin, Jennifer (December 15, 2015). "Enviros back Coffman foe in competitive Colo. district". Environment & Energy Daily. Retrieved 22 September 2016. 
  30. ^ Hutchins, Corey (September 7, 2016). "Colorado’s 6th District race: Mike Coffman vs. Morgan Carroll, a primer". Colorado Independent. Retrieved 22 September 2016. 
  31. ^ "Coffman outpaces Carroll again in quarterly CD6 fundraising, holds big cash lead - Aurora Sentinel". 2016-07-19. Retrieved 2016-09-24. 
  32. ^ "Fact Check: Did Morgan Carroll have a conflict of interest when she was state senator? – The Denver Post". Retrieved 2016-10-10. 
  33. ^ Whipple, Kelsey (22 February 2012). "Morgan Carroll's new book teaches readers how to Take Back Your Government". Westword. Retrieved 22 September 2016. 

External links[edit]