Mornay sauce

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Mornay sauce
Sauce Mornay.jpg
Mornay sauce over an orecchiette pasta dish
Type Sauce
Place of origin France
Main ingredients Béchamel sauce, Gruyère and Egg Yolk
Cookbook: Mornay sauce  Media: Mornay sauce

A Mornay sauce is a Béchamel sauce with shredded or grated Gruyère cheese and Egg Yolk added.[1][2] Some variations use different combinations of Gruyère, Emmental cheese, or white Cheddar.[3]

Etymology[edit]

Which duc de Mornay, if any, is honored in sauce Mornay is debated: Philippe, duc de Mornay (1549–1623), Governor of Saumur, and seigneur du Plessis-Marly, writer and diplomat, is generally the favored candidate, but a cheese sauce at his table would have to have been based on what we would term a velouté sauce, for Béchamel had not yet been concocted. Sauce Mornay does not appear in Le cuisinier Royal, 10th edition, 1820; perhaps sauce Mornay is not older than the great Parisian restaurant of the 19th century, Le Grand Véfour in the arcades of the Palais-Royal, where sauce Mornay was introduced.[4] In the tout-Paris of Charles X, the Mornay name was represented by two extremely stylish men, the marquis de Mornay and his brother, styled comte Charles; they figure in Lady Blessington's memoir of a stay in Paris in 1828–29, The Idler in France.[5] They might also be considered, when an eponym is sought for sauce Mornay.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ La Technique. New York, NY 10013: The French Culinary Institute. 1995. p. 44. 
  2. ^ Hasterosk, edição de Aude Mantoux ; colaboração de Laurence Alvado e Rupert (2007). Le grande Larousse gastronomique ([Éd. 2007]. ed.). Paris: Larousse. p. 783. ISBN 978-2-03-582360-1. 
  3. ^ McGee, Harold (2004). On Food and Cooking; The Science and Lore of the Kitchen. New York, NY, USA: Scribner. pp. 65–66 and 587. ISBN 0-684-80001-2. 
  4. ^ "Cuisine Bourgeoise". History of Gastronomy. Nicks Wine Merchants. Retrieved 2 July 2011. 
  5. ^ Blessington, Countess of (1841). The Idler in France. London, England, UK: Henry Colburn. 

External links[edit]