Morris Catholic High School

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Morris Catholic High School
Address
200 Morris Avenue
Denville Township, NJ, (Morris County) 07834
Coordinates 40°54′20″N 74°29′26″W / 40.90556°N 74.49056°W / 40.90556; -74.49056Coordinates: 40°54′20″N 74°29′26″W / 40.90556°N 74.49056°W / 40.90556; -74.49056
Information
Type Private, Coeducational
Motto "Scientia Caritatis Christi"[3]
("Knowledge of the Love of Christ")
Religious affiliation(s) Roman Catholic,
Sisters of Christian Charity
Established 1957
School district Diocese of Paterson
President Michael St. Pierre
Principal Robert Loia
Chaplain Rev. Carmen Buono
Faculty 37.0 (on FTE basis)[1]
Grades 912
Enrollment 400[1] (2013-14)
Student to teacher ratio 10.8:1[1]
Campus size 33 acres (130,000 m2)
Color(s) Blue and White         
Athletics conference Northwest Jersey Athletic Conference
Team name Crusaders
Accreditation Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools[2]
Publication Scope (literary magazine)
Yearbook The Shield
Website

Morris Catholic High School is a four-year comprehensive Roman Catholic regional high school located in Denville Township, in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. It was founded in 1957 and is part of the Diocese of Paterson. Morris Catholic High School has been recognized by the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program, the highest award an American school can receive.[4][5]

As of the 2013-14 school year, the school had an enrollment of 400 students and 37.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.8:1.[1]

The school has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1967.[2]

Awards, recognition and rankings[edit]

During the 1984-85 school year, Morris Catholic High School was awarded the National Blue Ribbon School Award of Excellence by the United States Department of Education.[6]

During the 2012-13 school year, students from Morris Catholic drama classes won first place at the New Jersey Thespian Festival.[7] It was the school's second win after taking the top prize for the main stage category the previous year.[8]

Athletics[edit]

The Morris Catholic High School Crusaders compete in the Northwest Jersey Athletic Conference which comprises 39 public and parochial high schools covering Morris County, Sussex County and Warren County, and operates under the jurisdiction of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA).[9] Prior to the NJSIAA's 2010 realignment, he school had participated in the Colonial Hills Conference which included public and parochial high schools covering Essex County, Morris County and Somerset County in west Central Jersey.[10] The sports that Morris Catholic offers are men's and women's soccer, football, women's volleyball, men's and women's basketball, wrestling, ice hockey, winter and spring track and field, men's and women's lacrosse, baseball, softball, fencing, and golf.

The 1974 and 1975 boys cross country team won the New Jersey Meet of Champions and finished the season ranked #1 in the state becoming the first team to win back-to-back titles.[11] They were Parochial B champions five consecutive years in 1974, 75, 76, 77 and 78.[12]

The 2000 girls' soccer team won the Parochial North B state sectional championship, defeating Kent Place School in the tournament final.[13]

The boys' soccer team won the 2005 NJSIAA North Group B State Championship with a 1-0 win against St. Rose High School.[14]

In 2007, the girls' basketball team won the NJSIAA North Group A State Championship with a 53 - 32 win against Immaculata High School.[15]

In 2010, Will Hurley placed 10th in the Northwest Jersey Athletic Conference inaugural golf tournament.

In 2010, the spring track and field team won the Non-Public B state sectional championship.[16]

In 2012, the girls' soccer team won the NJSIAA North Group B state championship with a 1-0 win against St. Rose High School to give the program their 13th state championship, the most of any team in the state.[17]

On November 20, 2013, the Morris Catholic Girls' soccer team captured its second consecutive NJSIAA/Sports Authority Non-Public B state championship with a 3-1 victory over St. Rose. [18]

On March 12, 2014, the Morris Catholic girls' basketball team "captured their 3rd NJSIAA State Sectional Championship in a row, their 10th since 2002" [19] in a 58-48 win over Lodi Immaculate.[20]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Morris Catholic High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 20, 2015.
  2. ^ a b Morris Catholic High School profile, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools. Accessed May 31, 2007.
  3. ^ About Us, Morris Catholic High School. Accessed July 17, 2012
  4. ^ Staff. "CIBA cited as one of the best by Education Department", Journal Inquirer, November 16, 2006. "The Blue Ribbon award is given only to schools that reach the top 10 percent of their state's testing scores over several years or show significant gains in student achievement. It is considered the highest honor a school can achieve."
  5. ^ Viers Mill School Wins Blue Ribbon; School Scored High on Statewide Test; The Washington Post. September 29, 2005 "For their accomplishments, all three schools this month earned the status of Blue Ribbon School, the highest honor the U.S. Education Department can bestow upon a school. It has its own student ministry team, which runs events for the school."
  6. ^ Blue Ribbon Schools Program: Schools Recognized 1982-1983 through 1999-2002 (PDF), United States Department of Education. Accessed May 11, 2006.
  7. ^ Walsh, Deborah (May 6, 2013). "Kinnelon and Butler youths win prestigious acting awards". NorthJersey.com. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  8. ^ Giannantonlo, Christina. "School Notebook: Morris Catholic takes top thespian honor". NJ.com. Retrieved 2 April 2014. 
  9. ^ League Memberships – 2014-2015, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association. Accessed December 15, 2014.
  10. ^ Home Page, Colonial Hills Conference, backed up by the Internet Archive, as of November 19, 2010. Accessed December 15, 2014.
  11. ^ Staff. "THREE TEAMS FROM THE AREA QUALIFY FOR MEET OF CHAMPIONS", Daily Record (Morristown), November 17, 1999. Accessed July 17, 2012. "Mount Olive has the only Morris County Girls Meet of Champions title. Morris Catholic won consecutive boys crowns in 1974 and 1975."
  12. ^ Staff. "Cross Country Notebook", Daily Record (Morristown), November 11, 2000. Accessed July 17, 2012. "The Morris Catholic boys lead local schools with five straight titles from 1974-79 under coach Tom Donahue."
  13. ^ 2000 Soccer - Parochial North B, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association. Accessed July 20, 2007.
  14. ^ 2005 Boys Soccer - Non-Public Finals, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association. Accessed June 4, 2007.
  15. ^ 2007 Girls Basketball - North A, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association. Accessed June 20, 2007.
  16. ^ Havsy, Jane. "BOYS TRACK AND FIELD: Boonton, Morris Catholic run down titles", Daily Record (Morristown), May 23, 2010. Accessed April 11, 2012. "Morris Catholic earned the inaugural North Non-Public B team title with 83 points, six more than Montclair Immaculate."
  17. ^ Bevensee, Rich. "Morris Catholic (1) at St. Rose (0), NJSIAA Group Tournament, Final Round, Non-Public B - Girls Soccer", The Star-Ledger, November 28, 2012. Accessed November 29, 2012. "With 3:04 left in a scoreless battle with St. Rose in the NJSIAA Non-Public B championship match, Sobierajski curled a bending corner kick into the box, where freshman Rachel Mills crashed in to head it home and send Morris Catholic to a 1-0 victory at The College of New Jersey in Ewing. The title was Morris Catholic’s 13th overall, a mark which now leads the state after the Denville program was tied with Ramapo."
  18. ^ Holcomb, Dave. "Girls soccer: Morris Catholic repeats as Non-Public B state champion, downs St. Rose, 3-1". http://highschoolsports.nj.com/. Retrieved 17 October 2014.  External link in |website= (help)
  19. ^ "Girls Basketball Captures Sectional Championship-State Group Championship Game Saturday". Morris Catholic High School. Retrieved 4 April 2014. 
  20. ^ Greco, Richard (March 12, 2014). "Girls basketball: Charlotte Schum leads Morris Catholic past Lodi Immaculate for North Jersey, Non-Public B crown". The Star-Ledger. Retrieved 4 April 2014. 
  21. ^ http://www.dailyrecord.com/story/sports/nfl/2016/12/13/morris-catholic-grad-lead-los-angeles-rams/95386370/
  22. ^ Havsy, Jane. "Safety is goal of new state guidelines", Daily Record (Morristown), August 26, 2007. Accessed February 4, 2011. "When Gallagher played at Morris Catholic in the 1960s, coaches would give players salt tablets."
  23. ^ Leibowitz, Barry. "Catholic School Teacher Murdered; Ex-Husband Sought in N.J. Murder in Home Where Both Still Lived", CBS News, June 22, 2010. Accessed February 4, 2011. "A family member found Judith Novellino's body around 7 p.m. Saturday and called 911. Bianchi said it appears that the woman, an English teacher at Morris Catholic High School, and her killer, were involved in 'a violent struggle.'"
  24. ^ A Million Words And Counting
  25. ^ No Free Will In Tomatoes
  26. ^ Staff. "Giants fan puts Glossary online", Daily Record (Morristown), January 25, 2001. Accessed December 17, 2012. "Just because the Boonton native has moved around a lot and now lives in the Bay Area, that doesn't mean he's given up on the Big Blue. Payack, the president and CEO of yourDictionary.com, is one of the minds behind the New York Giants Football Glossary and Baltimore Ravens Fan Glossary."
  27. ^ Peter Payack is Poet Populist of Cambridge, Massachusetts 2007-2009.
  28. ^ "A Life in the Balance". Time Magazine. November 3, 1975. Retrieved May 31, 2007. Friends from Morris Catholic High School, from which Karen graduated in 1972, describe her as a quiet person. 
  29. ^ "Teacher, 28, Slain In Her Apartment On West 72d Street; Teacher, 28, Is Slain in Her Apartment Other Violence Recalled". The New York Times. January 5, 1973. p. 65. 

External links[edit]