Morris E. Lasker

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Morris E. Lasker (July 17, 1917 - December 25, 2009) was a United States federal judge.

Born in Hartsdale, New York, Lasker received a B.A. from Harvard University in 1938 and an LL.B. from Yale Law School in 1941. He was a staff attorney of U.S. Senate Committee Investigating National Defense Programs from 1941 to 1942. He was in the United States Army during World War II, from 1942 to 1946. He was in private practice in New York City from 1946 to 1968. He was a Town attorney of New Castle, New York from 1955 to 1957. He was a Justice of the Peace, New Castle, New York from 1957 to 1958.

Lasker was a federal judge on the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. Lasker was nominated by President Lyndon B. Johnson on November 28, 1967, to a seat vacated by Richard H. Levet. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on June 24, 1968, and received commission the same day. He assumed senior status on October 3, 1983.

In 1994 he and his wife moved to the Boston, Massachusetts area so that they could be closer to their children.[1] From then until his death he served as a judge for the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts, by special designation. He died of cancer at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Massachusetts.[1]


In 1975, he denied a preliminary injunction to restrain the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) from broadcasting edited versions of three separate programs originally written and performed by Monty Python for broadcast by the BBC, brought to court by Terry Gilliam and Michael Palin.

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  1. ^ a b Marquard, Bryan (December 27, 2009), "Morris Lasker, 92; judge fought mandatory sentencing laws", The Boston Globe: B10, retrieved 2009-12-28