Morris Fish

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Morris Fish
CC QC
Puisne Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada
In office
August 5, 2003 – August 31, 2013
Nominated by Jean Chrétien
Preceded by Charles Gonthier
Succeeded by Clément Gascon
Personal details
Born (1938-11-16) November 16, 1938 (age 79)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Nationality Canadian

Morris Jacob Fish, CC QC (born November 16, 1938) was a judge of the Supreme Court of Canada from 2003 to 2013.[1]

Born in Montreal, Quebec, the son of Aaron S. Fish and Zlata Grober, he received a Bachelor of Arts (with distinction) in 1959 and a Bachelor of Law (first class honours) in 1962 from McGill University (where he was selected as the Articles Editor for the McGill Law Journal).[2] Upon graduation from law school, he was awarded the Greenshields Prize, the Crankshaw Prize for Highest Standing in Criminal Law and the Macdonald Travelling Scholarship.[3]

He practiced law mostly in Quebec for the law firm Cohen, Leithman, Kaufman, Yarosky & Fish which later became Yarosky, Fish, Zigman, Isaacs & Daviault between 1967 and 1989. He also lectured at a number of Canadian law schools. His expertise in practice and teaching was criminal law. He was appointed to the Quebec Court of Appeal on June 30, 1989 and was elevated to the Supreme Court of Canada on August 5, 2003, replacing Charles Gonthier. He retired from the Court on August 31, 2013.

Awards[edit]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Supreme Court of Canada biography
  2. ^ "Masthead, Volume 8". McGill Law Journal. 1961. 
  3. ^ Supreme Court of Canada Brochure
  4. ^ "For Immediate Release - University of Toronto Faculty of Law". University of Toronto Faculty of Law. Retrieved 31 December 2016. 
  5. ^ "Accolades". Concordia Journal Home. Concordia University. Retrieved 31 December 2016. 
  6. ^ "Moments to remember". McGill University. Retrieved 31 December 2016. 
  7. ^ [1] Criminal Lawyers Association website
  8. ^ "Governor General Announces 100 New Appointments to the Order of Canada as Canada Turns 150". The Governor General of Canada His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston. Retrieved 31 December 2016. 

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