Morris Township, New Jersey

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Morris Township, New Jersey
Township of Morris
Alnwick Hall
Motto(s): 
A community rich in history with a constant striving for a better tomorrow.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Morris Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Morris Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°47′46″N 74°29′40″W / 40.796095°N 74.494556°W / 40.796095; -74.494556Coordinates: 40°47′46″N 74°29′40″W / 40.796095°N 74.494556°W / 40.796095; -74.494556[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
FormedMarch 25, 1740
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Named forLewis Morris
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorMark J. Gyorfy (D, term ends December 31, 2022)[3][4]
 • AdministratorTimothy Quinn[5]
 • Municipal clerkDanielle Lewis[6]
Area
 • Total15.81 sq mi (40.96 km2)
 • Land15.68 sq mi (40.62 km2)
 • Water0.13 sq mi (0.34 km2)  0.83%
 • Rank171st of 565 in state
13th of 39 in county[1]
Elevation433 ft (132 m)
Population
 • Total22,974
 • Estimate 
(2020)[12]
22,974
 • Rank116th of 566 in state
5th of 39 in county[13]
 • Density1,465.0/sq mi (565.6/km2)
  • Rank339th of 566 in state
19th of 39 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
07960 – Morristown
07961 – Convent Station[14]
Area code(s)973[15]
FIPS code3402748090[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0882193[1][18]
Websitewww.morristwp.com

Morris Township is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2020 United States Census, the township's population was 22,974,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 668 (+3.0%) from the 22,306 counted in the 2010 Census, which had in turn increased by 510 (+2.3%) from the 21,796 counted in the 2000 Census.[19] The township was named for Lewis Morris, colonial governor of New Jersey.[20][21]

Located along the Morris and Essex Lines, the township is a bedroom community, with many residents traveling to work in nearby New York City on NJ Transit which provides commuters with direct access to New York Penn Station and to Hoboken Terminal.

The township is the "doughnut" around Morristown and completely surrounds it, with at least five times the area, though near Morris Plains the width of Morris Township is less than a mile. For 115 years, Morristown was part of Morris Township. The initial separation of Morristown from Morris Township occurred on April 6, 1865.[22] A confusing state of affairs followed for nearly thirty years. On February 18, 1895, the separation was officiated.[23]

Morris Township is home to the Morris County Golf Club and the Morris Museum, which is the second largest museum in New Jersey and has been in operation since 1913. The township is also home to the Morristown National Historical Park which in 1933 became the country's first National Historical Park.[24]

History[edit]

Washington Valley Schoolhouse
Madison Hotel, in Convent Station
Normandy Park Historic District

Incorporation[edit]

Morris Township was originally formed as of March 25, 1740. The township was named for Lewis Morris, colonial governor of New Jersey.[20][21]

Portions of the township were taken on December 24, 1740, to form Roxbury Township and on March 29, 1749, to form Mendham Township. Morris Township was incorporated as a township by the Township Act of 1798 by the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as part of the state's initial group of 104 townships.

Portions of the township were later taken to create Chatham Township (February 12, 1806), Morristown (April 6, 1865, fully independent in 1895) and Passaic Township (on March 23, 1866, now Long Hill Township).[22][25]

On September 22, 1860, the Jerseyman reported:

The total population of Morris Township is 6,024, being an increase of 1,032 since 1850 and of 348 since 1855. Number of families 1,147; Dwellings 1,124; Farms 256; Churches 11, viz., 3 Presbyterian, 3 Methodist, 2 Episcopalian, 1 Baptist, 1 Roman Catholic, 1 African. Deaths during the year 67. Raised last year 9,191 bushels of Wheat, 5,649 of Rye, 64,808 of Oats, 118,245 of Corn, 7,262 tons of Hay and 8,730 lbs. of Tobacco; and 92,366 lbs. of Butter were made. There are in the Township 1,642 Horses, 36 Mules, 1500 Cows, 200 Oxen, 1100 Young Cattle, 1262 Sheep and 1600 Swine.[23]

Washington Valley Historic District[edit]

Many historic properties are in the encompassing Washington Valley Historic District. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in November 1992.[26] Notable sites located in Washington Valley include the Washington Valley Schoolhouse and the John Smith House. Parts of the district are within neighboring Mendham Township.

Convent Station[edit]

Convent Station community is named after the Convent Station railroad station that was constructed there during the 1870s to serve the 200-acre (0.81 km2) complex of the Academy of Saint Elizabeth, a Catholic school operating under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson.[27]

Notable neighborhoods include Bradwahl, Cromwell Hills, and the upscale Normandy Park Historic District. The Morris Township Municipal Building and the Morris Township Police Headquarters are located in Convent Station.

Arthur Seale[edit]

In 1992, Arthur Seale and his wife kidnapped Exxon executive Sidney Reso, a township resident, from his home. The Seales' sought a ransom of $18.5 million, but Reso died in captivity. The case received nationwide attention.[28]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 15.81 square miles (40.96 km2), including 15.68 square miles (40.62 km2) of land and 0.13 square miles (0.34 km2) of water (0.83%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Convent Station, Gillespie Hill, Loantaka Terrace, Normandy Heights, Normandy Park and Washington Valley.[29]

Morris Township completely surrounds Morristown, making it part of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another.[30] The township borders the Morris County municipalities of Denville, Parsippany–Troy Hills Township, Morris Plains and Hanover Township to the north, Harding Township to the south, Mendham Township and Randolph to the west and Florham Park and Madison to the east.[31][32][33]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18103,753*
18203,524−6.1%
18303,5360.3%
18404,01313.5%
18504,99224.4%
18605,98519.9%
18705,674−5.2%
18801,419*−75.0%
18901,99940.9%
19002,57128.6%
19103,16122.9%
19202,824*−10.7%
19305,56597.1%
19406,1079.7%
19507,43221.7%
196012,09262.7%
197019,41460.6%
198018,486−4.8%
199019,9527.9%
200021,7969.2%
201022,3062.3%
202022,9743.0%
Population sources: 1810–1920[34]
1840[35] 1850–1870[36] 1850[37]
1870[38] 1880–1890[39]
1890–1910[40] 1910–1930[41]
1930–1990[42] 2000[43][44] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 22,306 people, 8,128 households, and 5,771 families in the township. The population density was 1,428.3 per square mile (551.5/km2). There were 8,502 housing units at an average density of 544.4 per square mile (210.2/km2). The racial makeup was 85.28% (19,022) White, 5.65% (1,261) Black or African American, 0.10% (23) Native American, 5.12% (1,141) Asian, 0.03% (6) Pacific Islander, 1.99% (444) from other races, and 1.83% (409) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.55% (1,683) of the population.[9]

Of the 8,128 households, 31.0% had children under the age of 18; 61.3% were married couples living together; 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present and 29.0% were non-families. Of all households, 23.9% were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.08.[9]

22.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 23.7% from 25 to 44, 29.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.3 years. For every 100 females, the population had 97.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 94.4 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $132,191 (with a margin of error of +/− $7,204) and the median family income was $154,265 (+/− $8,489). Males had a median income of $108,448 (+/− $5,932) versus $64,753 (+/− $12,368) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $65,335 (+/− $4,396). About 1.0% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.0% of those under age 18 and 10.3% of those age 65 or over.[45]

The township has been one of the state's highest-income communities. Based on data from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey, Morris Township had a per capita income of $65,335 (ranked 36th in the state), compared to per capita income in Morris County of $47,342 and statewide of $34,858.[46]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 21,796 people, 8,116 households, and 5,949 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,383.0 people per square mile (534.0/km2). There were 8,298 housing units at an average density of 526.5 per square mile (203.3/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 88.63% White, 5.46% African American, 0.15% Native American, 3.90% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.91% from other races, and 0.95% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.81% of the population.[43][44]

There were 8,116 households, out of which 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.6% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.7% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 2.99.[43][44]

In the township the population was spread out, with 22.7% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 64.9 males.[43][44]

The median income for a household in the township was $101,902, and the median income for a family was $116,866. Males had a median income of $80,946 versus $50,864 for females. The per capita income for the township was $54,782. About 2.1% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.[43][44]

Culture and tourism[edit]

Morris Museum
Morris County Golf Club
Fosterfields Living Historical Farm

Morris Museum[edit]

Actively running since 1913, the Morris Museum is the second largest museum in New Jersey at 75,524 square feet (7,016.4 m2). The museum is fully accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.

Morris County Golf Club[edit]

Founded in 1894, the Morris County Golf Club was unique at the time in that it was established and operated by women including Nina Howland. The club hosted the United States Women's Amateur Golf Championship in 1896, which was won by Beatrix Hoyt, making it the first national title to be contested in the state.[47] Two of the club's presidents have served as United States Golf Association presidents, which the club joined in 1895. Although he club was established in 1894 the current course was designed in 1916 by prominent architect Seth Raynor. The current Clubhouse was built in 1919.

Some notable figures in the sport have been associated with the Club, including Harry Vardon, Ted Ray, Bobby Jones, Chick Evans and Walter Kozak.[48]

Fosterfields[edit]

Since 1972, Fosterfields Living Historical Farm has been a state protected living history park and museum covering more than 200 acres (81 ha) in Morris Township. A 1915 farmhouse and 1854 Revere mansion owned by the families of Caroline Rose Foster are preserved. Activities such as educational programs, historical reenactments, storytellers, and public concerts are open to the general public throughout the year.[49][50][51]

Economy[edit]

Honeywell had been headquartered in Morris Township.[52]

Companies with offices and facilities in Morris Township include the Louis Berger Group[53] and The Seeing Eye, a guide dog school.[54]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Morris Township is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 564) statewide that use this form, the second-most commonly used form of government in the state.[55] The Township Committee is comprised of five members, who are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[7][56] The Mayor and Deputy Mayor are selected by the Township Committee from among its members at a reorganization meeting held in the first week of January each year.

As of 2022, members of the Morris Township Committee are Mayor Mark J. Gyorfy (D, term on committee ends December 31, 2024; term as mayor ends 2022), Deputy Mayor Catherine J. "Cathy" Wilson (D, term on committee ends 2023; term as deputy mayor ends 2022), Peter V. Mancuso (R, 2022), Tara Olivo-Moore (D, 2024) and William "Bud" Ravitz (D, 2023).[3][57][58][59][60][61][62]

Federal, state, and county representation[edit]

Morris Township is located in the 11th Congressional District[63] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[10][64][65]

For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Mikie Sherrill (D, Montclair).[66] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[67] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[68][69]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony M. Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and in the General Assembly by Brian Bergen (R, Denville Township) and Aura K. Dunn (R, Mendham Borough).[70]

Morris County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners comprised of seven members who are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either one or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election.[71] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[72]: 8  As of 2022, Morris County's Commissioners are Commissioner Director Tayfun Selen (R, Chatham Township, term as commissioner ends December 31, 2023; term as director ends 2022),[73] Commissioner Deputy Director John Krickus (R, Washington Township, term as commissioner ends 2024; term as deputy director ends 2022),[74] Douglas Cabana (R, Boonton Township, 2022),[75] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (R, Roxbury, 2022),[76] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (R, Montville, 2022),[77] Stephen H. Shaw (R, Mountain Lakes, 2024)[78] and Deborah Smith (R, Denville, 2024).[79][72]: 2 [80] The county's constitutional officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[81] As of 2022, they are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (R, Parsippany–Troy Hills, 2023),[82][83] Sheriff James M. Gannon (R, Boonton Township, 2022)[84][85] and Surrogate Heather Darling (R, Roxbury, 2024).[86][87]

Politics[edit]

As of October 26, 2017, there were a total of 17,566 registered voters in Morris Township, of which 5,458 (31.1%) were registered as Democrats, 5,694 (32.4%) were registered as Republicans and 6,353 (36.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 61 voters registered as Libertarians or Greens.[88]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 51.4% of the vote (6,133 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 47.6% (5,679 votes), and other candidates with 0.9% (113 votes), among the 11,990 ballots cast by the township's 16,497 registered voters (65 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 72.7%.[89][90] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 50.9% of the vote (6,509 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 47.9% (6,129 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (81 votes), among the 12,797 ballots cast by the township's 16,201 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.0%.[91] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 51.9% of the vote (6,488 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 47.1% (5,884 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (88 votes), among the 12,503 ballots cast by the township's 16,466 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 75.9.[92]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.7% of the vote (5,033 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 31.5% (2,380 votes), and other candidates with 1.8% (135 votes), among the 7,674 ballots cast by the township's 16,239 registered voters (126 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 47.3%.[93][94] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 55.1% of the vote (5,059 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 36.0% (3,309 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.9% (730 votes) and other candidates with 0.3% (30 votes), among the 9,185 ballots cast by the township's 15,846 registered voters, yielding a 58.0% turnout.[95]

Education[edit]

Students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the schools of the Morris School District, which also serves public school students from the communities of Morristown (K–12) and Morris Plains (9–12).[96][97][98] As of the 2018–2019 school year, the district, comprised of 10 schools, had an enrollment of 5,216 students and 441.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.8:1.[99] Schools in the district (with 2018–2019 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[100]) are Lafayette Learning Center[101] (102 students; in grade Pre-K), Alexander Hamilton School[102] (293; 3–5), Hillcrest School[103] (288; K–2), Thomas Jefferson School[104] (314; 3–5), Normandy Park School[105] (302; K–5), Sussex Avenue School[106] (301; 3–5), Alfred Vail School[107] (297; K–2), Woodland School[108] (289; K–2), Frelinghuysen Middle School[109] (1,081; 6–8) and Morristown High School[110] (1,860; 9–12).[111][112] The nine elected seats on the board of education are allocated based on the population of the constituent municipalities, with five seats assigned to Morris Township.[113]

The Academy of St. Elizabeth is a Catholic school for girls that admitted its first students in 1860, located in the Convent Station area, and operated independently of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson.[114][115] The school has an enrollment of 230 students and is the oldest school for girls in New Jersey.

The College of Saint Elizabeth is a private Roman Catholic, four-year, liberal arts college for women, located in Convent Station. The college was founded in 1899 by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth of New Jersey.[116]

The Rabbinical College of America, one of the largest Chabad Lubavitch Chasidic yeshivas in the world is located in Morristown. The Rabbinical College of America has a baal teshuva yeshiva for students of diverse Jewish backgrounds, named Yeshiva Tiferes Bachurim.[117] The New Jersey Regional Headquarters for the worldwide Chabad Lubavitch movement is located on the campus.

Transportation[edit]

I-287 southbound in Morris Township

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 126.51 miles (203.60 km) of roadways, of which 106.11 miles (170.77 km) were maintained by the municipality, 13.96 miles (22.47 km) by Morris County and 6.44 miles (10.36 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[118]

A few major roads pass through the community including Route 124, Route 24, CR 510, U.S. Route 202, and Interstate 287.

Public transportation[edit]

Convent Station[119] is a NJ Transit rail station located on the grounds of the College of Saint Elizabeth, offering service on the Morristown Line to Newark Broad Street Station, Secaucus Junction, Penn Station New York and Hoboken Terminal.[120]

NJ Transit offers local bus service on the 872, 873, 875 and 880 routes,[121] replacing service that had been offered on the MCM1, MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, MCM8 and MCM10 routes until 2010, when subsidies to the local provider were eliminated as part of budget cuts.[122][123]

The Morris County Traction Company began trolley service in downtown Dover in July 1904, and expanded over the years until the system was completed in 1914 all the way to Newark, via Morristown and Summit, including service in Morris Township. The trolleys were replaced with buses in 1928.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Morris Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Township Committee, Morris Township. Accessed April 11, 2022.
  4. ^ 2022 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed March 1, 2022. As of date accessed, Peter Mancuso is incorrectly listed as mayor.
  5. ^ Administration, Township of Morris. Accessed April 11, 2022.
  6. ^ Township Clerk, Township of Morris. Accessed April 11, 2022.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 116.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Morris, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Morris township, Morris County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Morris township[permanent dead link], New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  12. ^ QuickFacts for Morris township, Morris County, New Jersey; Morris County, New Jersey; New Jersey from Population estimates, July 1, 2019, (V2019), United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Convent Station, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Convent Station, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  20. ^ a b Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 8, 2015.
  21. ^ a b Gannett, Henry. The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, p. 215. United States Government Printing Office, 1905. Accessed September 8, 2015.
  22. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 194. Accessed October 29, 2012.
  23. ^ a b Barbara, Hoskins (1987). Morris Township, New Jersey : a glimpse into the past. Joint Free Public Library of Morristown and Morris Township. p. 2. ISBN 0-940631-03-2. OCLC 17997583.
  24. ^ National Park Service Cultural Landscapes Inventory Jockey Hollow Morristown National Historical Park 1999, National Park Service. Accessed September 5, 2020. "This culminated in the establishment of the Morristown National Historical Park in 1933, the first national historical park in the United States."
  25. ^ Historical Timeline of Morris County Boundaries, Morris County Library. Accessed December 24, 2016. "1740, March 25. Morris County is established. Morris County includes Morris Township, Pequannock (also referred to as Poquanick or Peqannoc), Hanover Township, and 'Morris Town.' From the Court of Common Pleas."
  26. ^ Foster, Janet W. (November 12, 1992). "NRHP Nomination: Washington Valley Historic District". National Park Service. {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help) "Accompanying 56 photos, from 1991". {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  27. ^ Morris County, Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson Catholic Schools Office. Accessed June 7, 2016.
  28. ^ Nieves, Evelyn. "Portrait of 2 Accused of Kidnapping: Ardent, Hapless Pursuit of Affluence", The New York Times, June 28, 1992. Accessed November 5, 2018. "Mr. Seale, an ex-police officer and Exxon security manager, and Mrs. Seale, known as Jackie, are charged with kidnapping the president of Exxon International, Sidney J. Reso, from the driveway of his Morris Township home on April 29 and demanding $18.5 million in ransom."
  29. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  30. ^ DeMarco, Megan. "Voters to decide whether to merge two Princetons into one", The Star-Ledger, November 3, 2011. Accessed January 8, 2017. "There are 22 sets of 'doughnut towns' in New Jersey, those where one town wraps around the other town". Note that following voter approval of the Princeton merger, 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" remain.
  31. ^ Areas touching Morris Township, MapIt. Accessed February 28, 2020.
  32. ^ Morris County Municipalities Map, Morris County, New Jersey Department of Planning and Preservation. Accessed February 28, 2020.
  33. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  34. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 16, 2013.
  35. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 16, 2013. Population of 4,006 shown for 1840 is seven less than value shown in table.
  36. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 256, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed December 19, 2012. "Morris contained a population in 1850 of 4,992; in 1860, including Morristown, 5,985; and in 1870, 5,674."
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  38. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  39. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 19, 2012. Population for Morris Township of 6,837 in 1880 and 10,155 in 1890 included the population of Morristown of 5,418 in 1880 and 8,156 in 1890, with the totals for each year calculated via subtraction.
  40. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 19, 2012.
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  43. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Morris township, Morris County, New Jersey[permanent dead link], United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  44. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Morris township, Morris County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 19, 2012.
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  54. ^ Historical Timeline Archived March 26, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, The Seeing Eye. Accessed December 19, 2012. " 1962 – The school acquires property for new campus in Morris Township, N.J.... 1965 – The school moves to the Morris Township location, opens an exhibit at the World's Fair, and is assigned its first zip code."
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  68. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "Menendez, who started his political career in Union City, moved in September from Paramus to one of Harrison's new apartment buildings near the town's PATH station.."
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  81. ^ New Jersey State Constitution (1947), Article VII, Section II, Paragraph 2, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed June 1, 2022. "County clerks, surrogates and sheriffs shall be elected by the people of their respective counties at general elections. The term of office of county clerks and surrogates shall be five years, and of sheriffs three years."
  82. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Esq., Office of the Morris County Clerk. Accessed June 1, 2022.
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  96. ^ Morris Board of Education District Policy 0110 - Identification, Morris School District. Accessed June 7, 2020. "Purpose The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Pre-Kindergarten through twelve in the Morris School District. Composition The Morris School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of the Township of Morris and Morristown. The Morris School District operates as an all purpose regional Pre-Kindergarten through twelve district."
  97. ^ Morristown High School 2016 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed June 7, 2020. "Comprised of 1,848 ethnically diverse students speaking more than 20 different languages, the educational program serves the students entrusted to the school by its communities: Morristown, Morris Township and Morris Plains."
  98. ^ Morris Plains Borough School 2016 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed May 16, 2017. "Borough School continues its collaboration with the Morris School District, strengthening and supporting the send-receive relationship between the two districts. As Borough students graduate from eighth grade and enroll in Morristown High School, it is important for them to have all of the same opportunities to connect with curriculum requirements that their high school classmates had as students in the Morris School District."
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  113. ^ What is the Board of Education?, Morris School District. Accessed June 7, 2020. "The Morris School District Board of Education is an elected, unpaid group of 10 citizens (5 from Morris Township, 4 from Morristown, and one from Morris Plains) who serve as representatives of their community."
  114. ^ History Archived August 20, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, Academy of St. Elizabeth. Accessed July 28, 2013. "Our first students entered in 1860 - the Registration Ledger of September 1 still resides in the principal's office, as do the records of every succeeding year. In 1865, the new Academy building was completed and its first commencement exercises were held on the growing campus."
  115. ^ Morris County, Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson Catholic Schools Office. Accessed September 8, 2015.
  116. ^ History Overview Archived July 28, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, College of Saint Elizabeth. Accessed July 28, 2013. "Founded in 1899 by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth, the College of Saint Elizabeth is the oldest four-year Catholic liberal arts college for women in the State of New Jersey, and one of the first Catholic women's colleges in the United States."
  117. ^ Home Page, Yeshiva Tiferes Bachurim. Accessed May 12, 2022.
  118. ^ Morris County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  119. ^ Convent Station, NJ Transit. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  120. ^ Morristown Line, NJ Transit. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  121. ^ Morris County System Map, NJ Transit. Accessed August 8, 2015.
  122. ^ Morris County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed August 8, 2015.
  123. ^ NJ Transit Restructures Morris County Bus Service; Four current 'MCM' routes will be expanded to six new bus routes, NJ Transit, September 13, 2010. Accessed August 8, 2015.
  124. ^ Fowler, Linda. "'Cash Cabbie' is a Jersey Driver", Inside Jersey, July 16, 2009. Accessed December 19, 2012. "As host of the Cash Cab game show on Discovery Channel, the Morris Township resident's job is to give unsuspecting contestants in Manhattan a real pick-me-up -- he's also a stand-up comedian -- while negotiating trivia questions and traffic jams. Think of it as Win Ben Bailey's Money -- or as much of it as possible before getting dropped off."
  125. ^ Izzo, Michael. "Cannabis Cocktails the focus of Morristown mixologist’s book", Daily Record, June 12, 2016. Accessed September 1, 2019. "Morristown 'Cocktail Whisperer' Warren Bobrow's Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations debuted earlier this month, and is a guide to adding marijuana to mixed drinks.... Bobrow, who grew up in Morris Township and went to Morristown-Beard, said he was raised with an emphasis on natural healing."
  126. ^ Assembly Member Michael Patrick Carroll, Project Vote Smart. Accessed August 17, 2007.
  127. ^ Staff. "Del Tufo Enters Race for Governor", The New York Times, February 21, 1985. Accessed September 4, 2014. "The 51-year-old lawyer, who lives in Morris Township, said that if elected, he would 'wage war' against organized crime.... Former State Senator Stephen B. Wiley, who also lives in Morris Township, announced his candidacy in November."
  128. ^ Canfarotta, Michael. "SJU's homegrown Red Bull", Times Ledger, December 16, 2011. Accessed July 18, 2012. "On Dec. 5, it was announced that Lade signed a contract with his hometown club. The Convent Station, N.J. native — from just outside Morristown — native was thrilled that he would be getting an opportunity to play for the team he grew up watching."
  129. ^ Hague, Jim. "Morris' Molnar living his dream with Notre Dame", Daily Record, February 24, 2010. Accessed August 19, 2012. "At age 48, after coaching stops all over the country, the former kid from Morris Township is fulfilling a dream.... After graduating from the now-defunct Bayley-Ellard in 1979, Molnar went to Lock Haven University in Pennsylvania, where he played football and went right from the gridiron to the school's coaching staff."
  130. ^ Staff. "Morris Township basks in reflected glory of Super Bowl star", Morris NewsBee, February 3, 2014. Accessed February 20, 2017. "The defensive coordinator for the Super Bowl Champions Seattle Seahawks, Dan Quinn, is a native son of Morris Township, a Morristown High School graduate and the brother of Township Administrator Timothy Quinn."
  131. ^ Morris Parks: A Fascinating Presentation of Pirates and the Gold Rush, Morris County, New Jersey. May 7, 2017. Accessed May 12, 2022. "On Sunday, May 21, from 1 to 3 p.m., noted author, educator, and historian William R. Chemerka, portrays General Joseph Warren Revere in a captivating presentation at Fosterfields Living Historical Farm in Morris Township. In 1852, Revere purchased 88-acres and contracted to build the impressive Gothic Revival-style house, The Willows, to overlook his farm."
  132. ^ Perlez, Jane. "5 Democrats In Jersey Governor Race Strive For Recognition", The New York Times, April 23, 1985. Accessed September 4, 2014. "Mr. Del Tufo, a former United States Attorney from Morris Township, is considered the least-known candidate. He is joined in the race by Mayor Kenneth A. Gibson of Newark; the State Senate majority leader, John F. Russo of Toms River; the Essex County Executive, Peter Shapiro, and former State Senator Stephen B. Wiley of Morris Township."

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