Morwenna Ludlow

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Morwenna Ludlow
Born1970 (age 48–49)
NationalityBritish
Academic background
Alma materUniversity of Oxford
Doctoral advisorKeith Ward
Academic work
DisciplineTheology
InstitutionsUniversity of Exeter
Notable worksGregory of Nyssa, Ancient and (Post)modern

Morwenna Ann Ludlow (born 1970) is a British historian, theologian, academic, and Anglican priest, specialising in historical theology. She is Professor of Christian History and Theology at the University of Exeter and Head of the Theology and Religion Department. She is known in particular for her work on Gregory of Nyssa.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Ludlow studied Literae Humaniores at the University of Oxford and remained there to study for a D.Phil. in Theology with a dissertation about universal salvation in Gregory of Nyssa and Karl Rahner. Ludlow began work on her D.Phil. at Trinity College but moved to Queen's College on receipt of a Holwell Studentship, and moved again to St John's College to take up a Junior Research Fellowship.[2]

Academic career[edit]

Ludlow worked at Wolfson College, Oxford and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge before moving to the University of Exeter. In 2006 Ludlow was appointed as lecturer in Patristics in the Department of Theology and Religion, University of Exeter. She was appointed Professor of Christian History and Theology in 2016. She delivered her inaugural lecture on the 3 November 2016 on The Workshop: Experiments in History and Theology.[3][4] She was President of the Ecclesiastical History Society (2017-18).[5]

Ludlow works primarily on patristics, in particular the work of the fourth-century Cappadocian theologian, Gregory of Nyssa. Ludlow uses her research into early Christian thought to examine modern theology by analysing the reception of patristic theology by modern writers. She also works on the history of eschatology in Christianity, with a focus on the idea of universal salvation.[1][6]

Ludlow is currently working on the aesthetic qualities and doctrinal content of 4th century Greek Christian texts through a project, Art, Craft and Rhetoric. In this work, Ludlow uses arts and crafts theorists from Ruskin and Morris up to the present-day in order to re-examine early Christian texts.[1][4]

Ludlow appeared on BBC Radio 4's In Our Time on 4 March 2018) to discuss the conversion of Augustine of Hippo to Christianity in a programme with Kate Cooper and Martin Palmer.[7]

Ordained ministry[edit]

Ludlow was ordained in the Church of England as a deacon in 2015 and as a priest in 2016.[8] She is a Curate at Exeter Cathedral.[9] Since October 2018, she has also served as canon theologian of the cathedral.[10]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Gregory of Nyssa, Ancient and (Post)modern (Oxford University Press, 2013)[11]
  • ed. with Scot Douglass Reading the Church Fathers (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2011)[12]
  • Universal Salvation: Eschatology in the Thought of Gregory of Nyssa and Karl Rahner (Clarendon Press, 2000)[13]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Professor Morwenna Ludlow | Theology and Religion | University of Exeter". humanities.exeter.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  2. ^ Ludlow, Morwenna (2000-12-07). Universal Salvation: Eschatology in the Thought of Gregory of Nyssa and Karl Rahner. Clarendon Press. ISBN 9780198270225.
  3. ^ "Professor Morwenna Ludlow | Ecclesiastical History Society". www.history.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  4. ^ a b Robinson, Debbie. "University of Exeter". humanities.exeter.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  5. ^ Conference Report: the Ecclesiastical History Society Conference 2017
  6. ^ "patristics | directors". patristics. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  7. ^ "Augustine's Confessions, In Our Time - BBC Radio 4". BBC. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  8. ^ "Morwenna Ann Ludlow". Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  9. ^ "Cathedral Clergy - Exeter Cathedral". Exeter Cathedral. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  10. ^ "Appointments". Church Times. 26 October 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  11. ^ Gregory of Nyssa, Ancient and (Post)modern. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press. 2013-05-19. ISBN 9780199677986.
  12. ^ Bloomsbury.com. "Reading the Church Fathers". Bloomsbury Publishing. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  13. ^ Ludlow, Morwenna (2000-12-07). "Universal Salvation: Eschatology in the Thought of Gregory of Nyssa and Karl Rahner". doi:10.1093/0198270224.001.0001/acprof-9780198270225.