Moseley Wrought Iron Arch Bridge

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Moseley Wrought Iron Arch Bridge
Moseley Wrought Iron Arch Bridge

The Moseley Wrought Iron Arch Bridge, also known as the Upper Pacific Mills Bridge, is a historic, riveted, wrought iron bowstring truss bridge now located on the campus of Merrimack College in North Andover, Massachusetts. It was added to the National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark list in 1998 [1] and was originally part of the North Canal Historic District on the National Register of Historic Place. It is the oldest iron bridge in Massachusetts,[2] and one of the oldest iron bridges in the United States. It was the first bridge in the United States to use riveted wrought iron plates for the triangular-shaped top chord.[3]

The bridge was completed in 1864 as Moseley Truss Bridge built by the Moseley Iron Building Works of Boston, to connect the Pacific Mills with Canal Street in Lawrence, Massachusetts by spanning the North Canal.[4] It partially collapsed in the late 1980s, but in 1989 it was removed to the Merrimack College campus in North Andover and was rehabilitated under the direction of Francis E. Griggs, Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering. It was placed over a campus pond as a footbridge, and was rededicated in this new location on October 23, 1995.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Moseley Wrought Iron Arch Bridge | ASCE". www.asce.org. Retrieved 2016-02-15. 
  2. ^ Jr, Griggs; E, F. (1997-05-01). "1864 MOSELEY WROUGHT-IRON ARCH BRIDGE: ITS REHABILITATION". Practice Periodical on Structural Design and Construction. 2 (2). ISSN 1084-0680. 
  3. ^ "Moseley Wrought Iron Arch Bridge | ASCE". www.asce.org. Retrieved 2016-02-15. 
  4. ^ "Upper Pacific Mills Bridge, Moved to Merrimack College, North Andover, MA, Lawrence, Essex County, MA". Historic American Buildings Survey, Engineering Record, Landscapes Survey. Retrieved 15 February 2016. 
  5. ^ ""Keep on Walking: St. Augustine, Sermon 169" by James A. Wenzel O.S.A.". scholarworks.merrimack.edu. pp. 20–21. Retrieved 2016-02-14. 

See also[edit]

Coordinates: 42°40′8.6″N 71°7′21.2″W / 42.669056°N 71.122556°W / 42.669056; -71.122556