Mostafa Nissaboury

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Mostafa Nissaboury is a Moroccan poet.[1][2]

Nissaboury (born in Casablanca in 1943) was one of the co-founders of the magazine Anfas/Souffles ("Breaths"), an avant-garde bilingual quarterly that published essays, poetry, and fiction. (The magazine was banned in 1971.) Together with Mohammed Khaïr-Eddine, Mostafa Nissaboury wrote the manifest "Poésie Toute" in 1964, another important milestone in the history of Moroccan literature.[3] He was fascinated by the workings of the human memory. In Casablanca he opened a house solely devoted to poetry. His works contributed much to the renewal of Moroccan poetry.[4]

  • La Mille et Deuxième nuit (1975) (orig. published in Casablanca in 1965)
  • Approche du désertique (1999)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Les "BILLETS BLEUS" : panorama d’une période charnière". Aujourd'hui Le Maroc. 1 April 2005. Retrieved 2 November 2010. 
  2. ^ Alex Hughes, Keith Reader, ed. (2002). Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture. CRC Press. p. 248. ISBN 978-0-203-00330-5. Retrieved 2 November 2010. 
  3. ^ Georgette Toësca, Itinéraires et lieux communs, Agence de coopération culturelle et technique, 1983, p.248
  4. ^ Georgette Toësca, Itinéraires et lieux communs, Agence de coopération culturelle et technique, 1983, p.249