Motion Computing

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Motion Computing
Private
Industry Technology
Founded 2001
Headquarters Austin, Texas
Owner Xplore Technologies
Website www.motioncomputing.fr

Motion Computing was a developer of slate Tablet PC computers located in Austin, Texas. Motion Computing focused on vertical markets such as healthcare[1] government,[2] public safety,[3][4] and construction.[5][6] It was the first company to introduce Gorilla Glass, Bonded displays, built-in array microphones, and UV light-based disinfection stations for clinical environments.[7]

History[edit]

Motion Computing was founded in 2001 by a team of former Dell executives including David Altounian and Scott Eckert, who served as CEO of Motion.[8][9][10][11] In 2002, it launched its first product, the Motion M1200, a tablet designed as a successor of pen slates from the 1990s.[12] The M1200 was the first slate tablet available in a 12 inch size.[13][14] That same year, Motion raised $6.5 million in funding. Its second funding round in 2003 raised $11.2 million, and the 2004 Series C round raised $25 million.[15][16] In 2003, Motion launched the M1300, which was the first 1 Ghz tablet using Intel Centrino mobile technology.[17][18][19] The M1400, released in 2004, was the first 12 inch slate tablet to have a View Anywhere display.[20][21]

Through its independent software vendor partnership program, Motion paired with companies including Active Ink and Mi-Co to advance the development of tablet PC applications.[22] In 2007, Motion released the first mobile clinical assistant (MCA), the C5, at UCSF Medical Center.[23][24]

Through a Series D funding round in 2008, the company closed $6 million.[25] In 2009, Motion secured $5.6 million in a round of financing from eight investors.[15] That same year, Motion announced that its C5 and F5 tablets would be the first rugged tablet PCs to use Corning's Gorilla Glass.[26][27]

In February 2011, Motion introduced ReadyDock, the first chemical-free disinfection stations using ultraviolet technology, for the C5 tablet.[28] In 2011, Motion Computing announced the Intel Atom "Oak Trail"-powered CL900 running Windows 7, a fully rugged 10" screen ultra-light Tablet PC, weighing 2.1 pounds.[29] The company then announced the CL910 tablet in July 2012 and the CL920 in October 2014.[30][31] Motion also released the LINCWorks RDA (Remote Data Access) series.[32]

In April 2015, Xplore Technologies Corp. purchased Motion Computing Inc. for $16 million.[8] At the time, Motion was the world's second-leading provider of rugged tablet PCs.[33]

Products[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Austin computer-maker unveils tablet for construction/health care industry". Austin Business Journal. 22 June 2010. Retrieved 4 November 2016. 
  2. ^ "Motion signs deals with government resellers". Austin Business Journal. 11 August 2003. Retrieved 4 November 2016. 
  3. ^ "Acadian Ambulance Streamlines Patient Care & Reduces O/T with Motion Computing Technology". 9-1-1 Magazine. 18 September 2013. Retrieved 4 November 2016. 
  4. ^ "Brenham (TX) Battles Heat, Crime, Mobility Challenges with Motion Rugged Tablets and In-Vehicle Solution". 9-1-1 Magazine. 4 September 2014. Retrieved 4 November 2016. 
  5. ^ Sean Portnoy (28 March 2014). "Motion Computing's R12 is a rugged 12.5-inch Windows tablet for $2,299". ZD Net. Retrieved 4 November 2016. 
  6. ^ Wayne Grayson (21 April 2014). "The Motion Computing R12 is a rugged Windows tablet designed for construction". Equipment World. Retrieved 4 November 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c Nathan Eddy (February 9, 2015). "Motion Computing Debuts F5m, C5m Rugged Tablets". eWeek. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  8. ^ a b "Two Austin companies that make tablet computers will merge". Austin Business Journal. 16 April 2015. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  9. ^ David H. Freedman. "The Rise of the Robotic Work Force". Inc. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  10. ^ Emilie Shaughnessy (13 January 2016). "The Dell Effect". Community Impact Newspaper. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  11. ^ "Motion CEO Scott Eckert resigns". Austin Business Journal. 7 January 2009. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  12. ^ "Tablet PCs: Motion Computing M1200". Pen Computing. December 2002. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  13. ^ "Tablet PCs: Motion Computing M1200". Pen Computing. December 2002. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  14. ^ Conrad H. Blickenstorfer. "Motion Computing M1400". Rugged PC Review. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  15. ^ a b "Motion Computing secures $5.6M financing". Austin Business Journal. 31 December 2009. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  16. ^ "Motion gets $25M investment". Austin Business Journal. 20 December 2004. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  17. ^ "Motion Computing Announces First 1 GHz Tablet PC Powered By Intel Centrino Mobile Technology". Motion Computing. 2 June 2003. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  18. ^ Michael Gros (22 August 2003). "New-And-Improved Tablet PCs Generate Buzz In The Market". CRN. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  19. ^ Charlotte Dunlap (24 June 2003). "Motion Computing M1300 Tablet PC review". CNet. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  20. ^ "Motion Computing M1400". PC Mag. 7 April 2004. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  21. ^ Conrad H. Blickenstorfer. "Motion Computing M1400". Rugged PC Review. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  22. ^ "Motion Computing, Active Ink Software Partner to Reduce Paper Forms". Wireless News. 3 August 2004. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  23. ^ Tiffany Boggs (20 February 2007). "Motion Computing Unveils the C5 Mobile Clinical Assistant Tablet PC". Tablet PC Review. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  24. ^ Charles McLellan (16 March 2007). "Motion Computing C5: the first Mobile Clinical Assistant". ZDNet. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  25. ^ "Motion Computing collects $6M from VCs". Austin Business Journal. 23 December 2008. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  26. ^ "Gorilla Glass -- lighter and tougher display protection". Rugged PC Review. 7 October 2009. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  27. ^ Xavier Lanier (6 October 2009). "Motion Computing C5 and F5 Get Gorilla Glass'". Gotta Be Mobile. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  28. ^ "ReadyDock:UV - Chemical-Free disinfection for the Motion C5". Mobile Health Computing. 17 February 2011. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  29. ^ "Motion Computing CL900". PC Magazine. 2 September 2011. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  30. ^ Sean Buckley (10 July 2012). "Motion Computing announces CL910 tablet for enterprise, promises Windows 8 upgrades". Engadget. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  31. ^ Conrad H. Blickenstorfer (November 2014). "Motion Computing CL920 tablet computer". Rugged PC Review. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  32. ^ "Motion Computing: Making mobility work". Urgent Communications. 1 May 2014. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  33. ^ Donny Jackson (17 April 2016). "Xplore Technologies buys assets of Motion Computing after foreclosure". Urgent Comm. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  34. ^ Brian Westover (March 25, 2014). "Take Motion Computing's Rugged R12 Tablet Anywhere". PC Mag. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  35. ^ Sean Portnoy (March 28, 2014). "Motion Computing's R12 is a rugged 12.5-inch WIndows tablet for $2,299". ZDNet. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  36. ^ Conrad H. Blickenstorfer (November 2014). "Motion Computing CL920 tablet computer". Rugged PC Review. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  37. ^ Conrad H. Blickenstorfer. "Motion F5te Tablet PC". Rugged PC Review. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  38. ^ "Motion Enhances Suite of Mobile Solutions for Utility, Launches Next Generation of Rugged Tablet at DistribuTECH". Tablet PC2. January 2013. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  39. ^ Chris Davies (May 19, 2010). "Motion F5v and C5v rugged tablets get Core i5 and i7". Slash Gear. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  40. ^ Sasha Muller (January 14, 2011). "Motion Computing F5v review". Alphr. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  41. ^ Conrad H. Blickenstorfer. "Motion Computing J3500". Rugged PC Review. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  42. ^ Charles McLellan (June 24, 2010). "Motion Computing J3500". ZDNet. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  43. ^ Matthew Elliott (October 17, 2011). "Motion Computing CL900 Review: A Tablet PC for the Enterprise". Tablet PC Review. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  44. ^ "Motion Computing CL900". PC Mag. September 2, 2011. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  45. ^ Charles McLellan (March 16, 2009). "Motion Computing J3400". ZDNet. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  46. ^ Tiffany Boggs (March 11, 2008). "Motion Computing F5 Tablet PC Review". Tablet PC Review. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  47. ^ "Motion Computing LE1700 Tablet PC". PC Mag. March 26, 2007. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  48. ^ Conrad H. Blickenstorfer. "Motion Computing LE1700". Rugged PC Review. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  49. ^ Conrad H. Blickenstorfer. "The Motion C5 MCA platform". Rugged PC Review. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  50. ^ Miriam Jones (July 31, 2006). "Products". Government Technology. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  51. ^ Ryan Block (July 7, 2005). "Motion Computing's new LS800 8.4-inch Tablet PC". Engadget. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  52. ^ "Motion LE1600". CNET. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  53. ^ "Motion Computing LE1600". PC Mag. May 19, 2005. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  54. ^ Brian Nadel (July 20, 2004). "Motion M1400 Tablet PC review". CNet. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  55. ^ Konstantinos Karagiannis (July 1, 2003). "A Centrino Tablet in Motion". PC Mag. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  56. ^ "Motion Computing M1300". Engadget. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  57. ^ Bruce Brown (April 8, 2003). "Motion M1200 Tablet PC". PC Mag. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 
  58. ^ Brian Nadel (November 5, 2002). "Motion Computing M1200 Tablet PC review". CNet. Retrieved November 3, 2016. 

External links[edit]