Mount Charleston, Nevada

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Mount Charleston, Nevada
MountCharlestonNVhomes.JPG
Location of Mount Charleston in Clark County, Nevada
Location of Mount Charleston in Clark County, Nevada
Mount Charleston, Nevada is located in the United States
Mount Charleston, Nevada
Mount Charleston, Nevada
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 36°15′29″N 115°38′6″W / 36.25806°N 115.63500°W / 36.25806; -115.63500Coordinates: 36°15′29″N 115°38′6″W / 36.25806°N 115.63500°W / 36.25806; -115.63500
CountryUnited States
StateNevada
CountyClark
Named forMount Charleston
Area
 • Total29.4 sq mi (76.0 km2)
 • Land29.4 sq mi (76.0 km2)
 • Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation
7,510 ft (2,289 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total357
 • Density9.7/sq mi (3.8/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (PST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP code
89124
Area code(s)702 and 725
FIPS code32-49310
GNIS feature ID0859202
WebsiteMount Charleston Town Advisory Board

Mount Charleston is an unincorporated town[1] and census-designated place in Clark County, Nevada, United States. The population was 357 at the 2010 census.[2]

The town of Mount Charleston is named for nearby Mount Charleston whose Charleston Peak at 11,916 feet (3,632 m) is the highest point in Clark County. The town of Mount Charleston is in a valley of the Spring Mountains to the northwest of Las Vegas, noted for its hiking trails. It is also known for its Retreat on Charleston Peak, a 64-room hotel. At an elevation of approximately 7,500 feet, temperatures are much lower than in Las Vegas, which has an elevation of about 2,000 feet, making it a popular place for Las Vegans to vacation. The mean high temperature is 20.4 degrees (Fahrenheit) cooler than in Las Vegas. The area is also known as a vacation village for wealthy Las Vegas residents.[3]

Geography[edit]

A view of Mt. Charleston

According to the United States Census Bureau, the census-designated place (CDP) of Mount Charleston (which may not coincide exactly with the town boundaries) has a total area of 29.4 square miles (76 km2), all of it land. The communities comprising Mt. Charleston are made up of four subdivisions: Echo, Cathedral, Old Town and Rainbow, as well as a condominium complex next to the US Forest Service's Kyle Gateway.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 285 people, 133 households, and 80 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 9.7 people per square mile (3.7/km2). There were 362 housing units at an average density of 12.3 per square mile (4.8/km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.54% White, 1.05% African American, 0.35% Pacific Islander, 0.70% from other races, and 0.35% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.46% of the population.

There were 133 households, out of which 18.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 4.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.8% were non-families. 29.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 2.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.69.

In the CDP, the population was spread out, with 15.8% under the age of 18, 3.9% from 18 to 24, 21.8% from 25 to 44, 45.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49 years. For every 100 females, there were 119.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 124.3 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $63,125, and the median income for a family was $67,625. Males had a median income of $75,471 versus $35,938 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $38,821. None of the population or families were below the poverty line.

A view of some homes in Mt. Charleston.

Transportation[edit]

Access to the community is from State Route 156, State Route 157 and State Route 158.

Education[edit]

There is a two classroom elementary (K-5) school. Originally named in 1966 as the Mt. Charleston Elementary School, it was renamed in 2001 by the Clark County School District to the Earl B. Lundy Elementary School, in honor of its long time custodian. Mount Charleston has a public library, a branch of the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.[5]

Climate[edit]

Mount Charleston has a cool Mediterranean climate (Köppen Csb), with some continental influence (Dsb) by 0 °C isotherm.[6] Very similar to that of Flagstaff, Arizona though with rather less frequent and abundant monsoonal storms. In contrast to the arid climate of the rest of Nevada, precipitation as rain and melted snow is sufficient to support coniferous forests, with typically 11 inches or 0.28 metres of snow on the ground in February and a maximum monthly snowfall in a limited record of 89 inches or 2.26 metres in December 2010. Summers are markedly cooler than in the lower deserts, with the average July high being only 79.4 °F or 26.3 °C and minima often below 50 °F or 10 °C. On average over half of all nights are below 32 °F or 0 °C and in extreme cold waves temperatures may fall below 0 °F or −17.8 °C, with −15 °F (−26.1 °C) reached during the 1949 Western North American cold wave.

Climate data for Mount Charleston Lodge, Nevada. (Elevation 7,420ft)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 70
(21)
69
(21)
73
(23)
79
(26)
86
(30)
93
(34)
98
(37)
93
(34)
90
(32)
83
(28)
79
(26)
69
(21)
98
(37)
Average high °F (°C) 44.0
(6.7)
43.4
(6.3)
48.8
(9.3)
54.8
(12.7)
64.4
(18.0)
74.1
(23.4)
79.4
(26.3)
78.2
(25.7)
71.7
(22.1)
61.4
(16.3)
51.6
(10.9)
44.3
(6.8)
59.7
(15.4)
Average low °F (°C) 19.2
(−7.1)
19.8
(−6.8)
23.5
(−4.7)
28.2
(−2.1)
36.4
(2.4)
44.1
(6.7)
52.0
(11.1)
50.6
(10.3)
43.5
(6.4)
34.5
(1.4)
26.0
(−3.3)
19.4
(−7.0)
33.1
(0.6)
Record low °F (°C) −11
(−24)
−15
(−26)
1
(−17)
7
(−14)
16
(−9)
17
(−8)
31
(−1)
30
(−1)
17
(−8)
9
(−13)
1
(−17)
−18
(−28)
−18
(−28)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 2.83
(72)
3.51
(89)
1.92
(49)
1.23
(31)
0.70
(18)
0.29
(7.4)
2.13
(54)
1.89
(48)
1.69
(43)
1.96
(50)
1.31
(33)
3.61
(92)
23.07
(586.4)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 18.2
(46)
29.3
(74)
13.2
(34)
8.3
(21)
1.0
(2.5)
0.2
(0.51)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
1.6
(4.1)
5.2
(13)
20.0
(51)
97.1
(247)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 inch) 4 6 5 4 2 2 6 4 3 3 3 5 47
Source: The Western Regional Climate Center[7]

History[edit]

Charleston Park[edit]

According to historian Stanley W. Paher, Conrad Keil (a.k.a. Kyle) built a sawmill and cabin in Kyle Canyon circa 1870–1880. It is shown on a 1881 plat map as being across from Fletcher Canyon, where the historic US Forest Service Administrative Site is located. A 1929 plat map shows that area was serviced by a water pipeline from Fletcher Spring. The Civilian Conservation Corps Camp Charleston Mountain was based there beginning in 1933. According to NVCRIS archaeological records in the Nevada State Historical Preservation Office, another pipeline originating from Fletcher Spring was run to three water tanks on present day Mt. Charleston Church property, which serviced the 1950s-1980s era Young Ranch. The historic Young Ranch property is presently the Retreat on Charleston Peak and Spring Mountains Visitor Gateway.

Edmund W. Griffith initially established a campground in Kyle Canyon around 1905, concurrent with establishment of the Tule Station on the Las Vegas & Tonopah Railroad. His development, shown on the 1929 plat map to be in the present day Old Town Subdivision, was named Charleston Park. Griffith's Charleston Park Lodge (a.k.a. Griffith's Lodge) was built around 1915. A casino was later added to the lodge, which burned down in 1961. Historical postcards in the Pomona (CA) Public Library show that lodge was at the present location of the Mt. Charleston Library and Volunteer Fire Department[8][9][10]

Amenities[edit]

Mt. Charleston Lodge[edit]

Cabins at Mt. Charleston Lodge (2015)

The Mt. Charleston Lodge was a longtime restaurant located adjacent to Cathedral Subdivision at the end of Nevada Rte. 157 Kyle Canyon Road. By 1948, the Mt. Charleston Lodge included a rustic 25-room lodge and 13 cottages, and was owned by the owners of the Frontier casino in Las Vegas.[10][11][12]

A fire destroyed the Mt. Charleston Lodge on December 28, 1961. It took firefighters from Las Vegas more than an hour to reach the site,[13] and a fire station was later built in Old Town to help stop any future fires.[14][15] The Bailey family, owners of the Hacienda resort in Las Vegas, also owned the Mt. Charleston Lodge at the time of the fire,[9] and they announced plans to rebuild it. Construction began in 1962.[16][17][18] Four years later, a 150-person restaurant was added to the Mt. Charleston Lodge, which also had a 100-person lounge and 15 slot machines.[19] The Orcutt family took over operations in 1974,[20][21] and in 1994 added over a dozen cabins,[20][22][23] located next to the restaurant.[24] In 2018, it was sold to the Ellis family, which also owned the Ellis Island casino in Las Vegas.[25][26]

On September 17, 2021, at approximately 4:45 a.m., a large fire destroyed the Mt. Charleston Lodge again. None of the adjacent cabins were damaged.[27] The fire originated in a storage area under an exterior deck, and was not considered suspicious,[28] although firefighters deemed the lodge a total loss.[29] The Ellis family plans to rebuild the lodge,[29][30] which was a local landmark and a popular gathering spot for the community.[8][29][30][31] The cabins reopened a week after the fire.[32][33]

Hotel[edit]

The Resort on Mount Charleston (2016)

The Mount Charleston Hotel was built along Kyle Canyon Road in 1984.[34][35] It has 64 rooms and a restaurant. In 2008, it was purchased by The Siegel Group, which renovated and renamed it as the Resort on Mount Charleston.[35][36] In 2018, it was sold again and renamed as the Retreat on Charleston Peak, following another renovation.[34][37]

Canceled project[edit]

In 1996, plans were announced for the Mount Charleston Golf Resort to be built in the area, as part of a project known as Alpine Village.[38][39] The golf course opened in July 1997, next to the Mount Charleston Hotel. Later that year, the golf course was put up for sale. A hotel had been planned to accompany the course, but it was never built.[40] Mount Charleston residents opposed plans for a shopping center that would also accompany the project.[41][42] The shopping center was eventually rejected by the Clark County Commission.[43][44]

The developer then started negotiations to swap the entire property with the federal government,[45] which eventually purchased the site in 2004. The golf course had never been a popular attraction, and the U.S. Forest Service intended to restore the land to its natural state. Unfinished buildings from the project would be demolished, and the Forest Service planned to build a recreational complex on the site.[46][47][48]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.clarkcountynv.gov/government/departments/administrative_services/boards_link/mount_charleston_town_advisory_board.php Mount Charleston Town Board
  2. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Mount Charleston CDP, Nevada". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2012.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2015-09-05.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-12. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "Nevada Public Libraries". PublicLibraries.com. Retrieved 14 June 2019.
  6. ^ "Mount Charleston climate: Average Temperature, weather by month, Mount Charleston weather averages - Climate-Data.org". en.climate-data.org. Retrieved 2019-02-15.
  7. ^ "MT. CHARLESTON F.S., NEVADA: Period of Record General Climate Summary". Western Regional Climate Center. Retrieved July 27, 2015.
  8. ^ a b Przybys, John (September 17, 2021). "A history of the Mount Charleston Lodge". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  9. ^ a b Kean, Tricia (September 17, 2021). "History of the Mount Charleston Lodge". KTNV. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  10. ^ a b Joyce, Kirsten (September 17, 2021). "Historic Mount Charleston Lodge remembered after fire destroys local landmark". KLAS. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  11. ^ "Mt. Charleston Lodge Is Leased". Reno Evening Gazette. October 7, 1948. Retrieved February 27, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Lodge Leased To Partnership". The Independent. October 5, 1948. Retrieved February 27, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Mt. Charleston Lodge Destroyed". Reno Evening Gazette. December 29, 1961. Retrieved February 27, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Residents Seek Charleston Area Fire Protection". Reno Evening Gazette. January 2, 1962. Retrieved February 27, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "Mt. Charleston Fire Station To Be Built". Las Vegas Sun. June 8, 1962. Retrieved February 27, 2021 – via NewspaperArchive.com.
  16. ^ "Lodge Destroyed By Fire Slated For Rebuilding". Reno Evening Gazette. January 3, 1962. Retrieved February 27, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Hacienda". Los Angeles Times. December 9, 1962. Retrieved February 27, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "To Begin Construction May 22 On Plush Mt. Charleston Lodge". Las Vegas Sun. May 16, 1962. Retrieved February 27, 2021 – via NewspaperArchive.com.
  19. ^ "Cool Break From Las Vegas Glitter". Los Angeles Times. February 12, 1984. Retrieved February 27, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ a b Levy, Rachael (April 26, 1996). "IRS seizes Charleston Lodge for back taxes". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  21. ^ "Mountain offers gambling reprieve". Arizona Republic. August 6, 1989. Retrieved February 27, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ Koch, Ed (November 17, 2005). "Mountain lodge owner dies at 76". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  23. ^ "Angry investors form group to go after Orcutt". Las Vegas Sun. April 6, 2006. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  24. ^ "Orcutt lawsuit likely to be filed this week". Las Vegas Sun. May 31, 2006. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  25. ^ Akers, Mick (April 20, 2018). "Ellis Island new owners of Mt. Charleston Lodge". VegasInc. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  26. ^ Reese, Madelyn (April 30, 2018). "Ellis Island owners may bring gaming to Mount Charleston Lodge". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  27. ^ Emerson, Elaine (September 17, 2021). "'A total loss': Clark County firefighters tackle blaze at Mt. Charleston Lodge". KVVU. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  28. ^ Puit, Glenn; Dylan, Jonah (September 20, 2021). "Mount Charleston Lodge fire started in storage area". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  29. ^ a b c Puit, Glenn; Newberg, Katelyn (September 17, 2021). "Mount Charleston lodge 'total loss' after early morning blaze". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  30. ^ a b Harrison, Casey; Horwath, Bryan (September 17, 2021). "Owner vows to rebuild after fire at Mt. Charleston Lodge". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  31. ^ Haas, Greg (September 17, 2021). "Mt. Charleston Lodge fire: 'Heartbreaking' loss for all of Las Vegas". KLAS. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  32. ^ Miller, Shannon (September 22, 2021). "Mt. Charleston Lodge cabins to reopen Sept. 24". KVVU. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  33. ^ Perricone, Sophia (September 27, 2021). "First crews on scene of Mt. Charleston Lodge fire detail initial scene, containing spread". KVVU. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  34. ^ a b "Mountain resort outside Las Vegas purchased for nearly $5M". Associated Press. July 4, 2018. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  35. ^ a b Bennett, Andrea. "The Retreat on Mount Charleston – Hotel Review". Condé Nast Traveler. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  36. ^ "Mount Charleston Hotel sold as another goes bankrupt". Las Vegas Sun. December 11, 2008. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  37. ^ Segall, Eli (June 29, 2018). "Resort on Mount Charleston sold to North Carolina couple for $4.8M". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  38. ^ Steinhauer, Adam (October 14, 1996). "Developers see resort through trees". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  39. ^ Caruso, Monica (July 5, 1997). "New course putts ahead". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on January 14, 2002.
  40. ^ Caruso, Monica (November 25, 1997). "Developer puts resort up for sale". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 9, 1999.
  41. ^ Schweers, Jeff (April 23, 1998). "One community beats rezoning, another loses". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  42. ^ Schweers, Jeff (May 12, 1998). "Mount Charleston residents vow fight". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  43. ^ Friess, Steve (July 23, 1998). "County halts mountain plan". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on September 14, 2000.
  44. ^ Packer, Adrienne (July 23, 1998). "Residents win battle over Mount Charleston". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  45. ^ Packer, Adrienne (August 10, 1999). "Mounting a deal". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  46. ^ "Visitors center may replace golf course". Las Vegas Sun. March 10, 2004. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  47. ^ "Failed golf resort to make way for recreation area". Las Vegas Sun. November 20, 2005. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  48. ^ "Telling it on the mountain". Las Vegas Sun. March 26, 2006. Retrieved February 27, 2021.

External links[edit]