Mount Ephraim, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Mount Ephraim, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Mount Ephraim
Motto(s): "The Village at the Crossroads"
Mount Ephraim highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Mount Ephraim highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mount Ephraim, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mount Ephraim, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°52′47″N 75°05′27″W / 39.879666°N 75.090948°W / 39.879666; -75.090948Coordinates: 39°52′47″N 75°05′27″W / 39.879666°N 75.090948°W / 39.879666; -75.090948[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated March 23, 1926
Named for Ephraim Albertson
Government[6]
 • Type Walsh Act
 • Body Board of Commissioners
 • Mayor Joseph E. Wolk (term ends May 15, 2019)[3][4]
 • Municipal clerk Terry Shannon[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 0.900 sq mi (2.332 km2)
 • Land 0.881 sq mi (2.282 km2)
 • Water 0.019 sq mi (0.050 km2)  2.16%
Area rank 516th of 566 in state
29th of 37 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 30 ft (9 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 4,676
 • Estimate (2016)[11] 4,631
 • Rank 387th of 566 in state
24th of 37 in county[12]
 • Density 5,307.9/sq mi (2,049.4/km2)
 • Density rank 102nd of 566 in state
9th of 37 in county[12]
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC-4 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP code 08059[13][14]
Area code(s) 856 exchanges: 456, 742, 931, 933[15]
FIPS code 3400748750[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885313[1][18]
Website www.mountephraim-nj.com

Mount Ephraim is a borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,676,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 181 (+4.0%) from the 4,495 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 22 (-0.5%) from the 4,517 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Mount Ephraim was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 23, 1926, from portions of the now-defunct Centre Township. The boroughs of Bellmawr, Runnemede and Lawnside were simultaneously created during the same two-day period.[20] The borough was named for Ephraim Albertson, who owned a tavern in the area in the early 1800s.[21][22]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.900 square miles (2.332 km2), including 0.881 square miles (2.282 km2) of land and 0.019 square miles (0.050 km2) of water (2.16%).[1][2]

Mount Ephraim borders Audubon, Bellmawr, Brooklawn, Gloucester City, Haddon Heights and Haddon Township.[23]

Weather[edit]

On September 4, 2012, at 6:31 p.m., a tornado touched down in Mount Ephraim, causing damage to trees and homes in the immediate vicinity. It was categorized as F-0 by the National Weather Service, with winds topping out at 70 mph, making it the first tornado recorded in the state in more than a year.[24]


Census results[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19302,319
19402,282−1.6%
19504,44995.0%
19605,44722.4%
19705,6253.3%
19804,863−13.5%
19904,517−7.1%
20004,495−0.5%
20104,6764.0%
Est. 20164,631[11][25]−1.0%
Population sources:
1930-2000[26] 1930[27]
1930-1990[28] 2000[29][30] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,676 people, 1,909 households, and 1,193 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,307.9 per square mile (2,049.4/km2). There were 2,010 housing units at an average density of 2,281.6 per square mile (880.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.56% (4,375) White, 2.14% (100) Black or African American, 0.09% (4) Native American, 0.68% (32) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.27% (106) from other races, and 1.26% (59) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.33% (249) of the population.[8]

There were 1,909 households out of which 26.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.6% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.5% were non-families. 31.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.11.[8]

In the borough, the population was spread out with 20.6% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 26.5% from 25 to 44, 29.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.1 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 92.4 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $61,331 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,103) and the median family income was $73,955 (+/- $4,630). Males had a median income of $51,049 (+/- $3,914) versus $41,087 (+/- $3,242) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,885 (+/- $5,190). About 5.6% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.9% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over.[31]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 4,495 people, and 1,174 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,100.1 people per square mile (1,972.2/km2). There were 1,881 housing units at an average density of 2,134.2 per square mile (825.3/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.51% White, 0.40% African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.62% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.65% from other races, and 0.73% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.98% of the population.[29][30]

There were 1,818 households out of which 27.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.1% were married couples living together, 8.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.4% were non-families. 30.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.13.[29][30]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 17.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.3 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,824, and the median income for a family was $59,468. Males had a median income of $41,455 versus $30,359 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,150. About 2.0% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Mount Ephraim has been governed under the Walsh Act by a three-member commission, since 1935. Three commissioners are elected at-large in nonpartisan elections held as part of the May municipal election to serve concurrent terms of office. Each commissioner is assigned a department to oversee as part of their elected service.[6][32]

As of May 2015, Mount Ephraim's commissioners are Mayor Joseph Wolk (Commissioner of Revenue and Finance), Andrew Gilmore (Commissioner of Public Affairs and Public Safety) and Michael "Traz" Tovinsky (Commissioner of Public Works, Parks and Public Property), all of whom are serving concurrent terms of office that end May 15, 2019.[3][33][34][35]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Mount Ephraim is located in the 1st Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 5th state legislative district.[9][37][38]

New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[39] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[40] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, 2019).[41][42]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 5th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Nilsa Cruz-Perez (D, Barrington) and in the General Assembly by Patricia Egan Jones (D, Barrington) and William Spearman (D, Camden).[43][44] Spearman took office in June 2018 followingh the resignation of Arthur Barclay.[45] The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy (D, Middletown Township).[46] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Sheila Oliver (D, East Orange).[47]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year.[48] As of 2018, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr. (D, Collingswood, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2020; term as director ends 2018),[49] Freeholder Deputy Director Edward T. McDonnell (D, Pennsauken Township, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as deputy director ends 2018),[50] Susan Shin Angulo (D, Cherry Hill, 2018),[51] William F. Moen Jr. (D, Camden, 2018),[52] Jeffrey L. Nash (D, Cherry Hill, 2018),[53] Carmen Rodriguez (D, Merchantville, 2019)[54] and Jonathan L. Young Sr. (D, Berlin Township, 2020).[55][48]

Camden County's constitutional officers, all elected directly by voters, are County clerk Joseph Ripa (Voorhees Township, 2019),[56][57] Sheriff Gilbert "Whip" Wilson (Camden, 2018)[58][59] and Surrogate Michelle Gentek-Mayer (Gloucester Township, 2020).[60][61][62] The Camden County Prosecutor is Mary Eva Colalillo.[63][64]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,110 registered voters in Mount Ephraim, of which 1,402 (45.1%) were registered as Democrats, 403 (13.0%) were registered as Republicans and 1,305 (42.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[65]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 60.7% of the vote (1,278 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 37.7% (793 votes), and other candidates with 1.7% (35 votes), among the 2,131 ballots cast by the borough's 3,320 registered voters (25 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 64.2%.[66][67] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 58.6% of the vote (1,334 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 37.6% (855 votes), with 2,275 ballots cast among the borough's 3,086 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.7%.[68] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 58.8% of the vote (1,309 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 39.9% (888 votes), with 2,228 ballots cast among the borough's 2,982 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.7.[69]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 62.9% of the vote (753 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 35.9% (430 votes), and other candidates with 1.3% (15 votes), among the 1,222 ballots cast by the borough's 3,353 registered voters (24 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 36.4%.[70][71] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 47.3% of the vote (621 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 42.7% (560 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 6.2% (81 votes), with 1,312 ballots cast among the borough's 3,127 registered voters, yielding a 42.0% turnout.[72]

Town merger proposal[edit]

In January of 2018, New Jersey State Senate President Steve Sweeney put forward a proposal which would lower real estate taxes in the state and cut state expenses by merging many of the states 568 towns. Mount Ephraim is the second-smallest town in New Jersey after Audubon Park, so it is very likely that the town will be merged with neighbouring towns to cut costs, share expenses, reduce bureaucracy, share resources, and reduce the burden in the taxpayers and the state itself. Mount Ephraim was formerly part of Centre Township, which including all of the neighboring towns, and it is possible that the name may be used again in the future if the merger proposal goes forward. [73]

Education[edit]

The Mount Ephraim Public Schools serve students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its two schools had an enrollment of 631 students and 34.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 18.2:1.[74] Schools in the district (with 2014-15 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[75]) are Mary Bray Elementary School[76] (244 students in grades PreK-4) and Raymond W. Kershaw Middle School[77] (181 students; grades 5-8).[78][79]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Audubon High School, in Audubon, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Audubon School District.[80][81] As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 879 students and 74.3 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.8:1.[82]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 16.67 miles (26.83 km) of roadways, of which 13.25 miles (21.32 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.35 miles (3.78 km) by Camden County and 1.07 miles (1.72 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[83]

Interstate 76 (providing access to Philadelphia and to Interstate 295) and U.S. Route 130 are both accessible across borough lines in Gloucester City.

Public transportation[edit]

Mount Ephraim is served by two NJ Transit bus lines. Service between the borough and Philadelphia is available on the 400 route, with local service on the 457 route between the Moorestown Mall and Camden.[84][85]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Mount Ephraim include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Who are the Commissioners of Mount Ephraim?, Borough of Mount Ephraim. Accessed June 26, 2016.
  4. ^ 2017 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  5. ^ Contacts, Borough of Mount Ephraim. Accessed June 26, 2016.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 38.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Mount Ephraim, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Mount Ephraim borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 3. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Mount Ephraim borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - 2016 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Mount Ephraim, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Mount Ephraim, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 107. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  21. ^ A Brief History, Borough of Mount Ephraim. Accessed September 8, 2015. "Originally a colonial settlement, the town Mount Ephraim came into popularity by a man named Ephraim Albertson, who owned the Public House, also called the Old Tavern, a popular meeting place, at Black Horse Pike & Kings Highway, from 1800 to 1825."
  22. ^ Prowell, George Reeser. The History of Camden County, New Jersey, p. 711. Richards, 1886. Accessed September 8, 2015. "A public house has been kept in this locality from a period so remote that the memory of the oldest citizen does not reach it. The first keeper is not remembered, but it is believed to have been Albertson from whom the village obtained its name and who owned the land."
  23. ^ Areas touching Mount Ephraim, MapIt. Accessed March 3, 2015.
  24. ^ via Associated Press. "Tornado confirmed in Mount Ephraim, New Jersey", WABC-TV, September 5, 2012. Accessed June 5, 2013. "The National Weather Service says a tornado touched down in southern New Jersey, the first confirmed one in the state in more than a year. Meteorologist Mitchell Gaines says it was an F-0 twister - the lowest classification."
  25. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  26. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  27. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  28. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  29. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Mount Ephraim borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Mount Ephraim borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Mount Ephraim borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  32. ^ The Commission Form of Municipal Government Archived 2014-08-11 at the Wayback Machine., p. 53. Accessed August 11, 2007.
  33. ^ 2016 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Mount Ephraim. Accessed June 26, 2016.
  34. ^ Mount Ephraim Municipal Election Results May 12, 2015, Borough of Mount Ephraim. Accessed June 2, 2015.
  35. ^ Trethan, Phaedra. "Mount Ephraim mayor, one commissioner return", Courier-Post, May 13, 2015. Accessed June 2, 2015. "Mayor Joseph Wolk and Commissioner Andrew Gilmore are returning to the three-member board of commissioners; Commissioner Bruce Greenwald, who resigned, will be replaced by Michael 'Traz' Tovinsky."
  36. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ 2017 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  38. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  40. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  41. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  42. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  43. ^ Legislative Roster 2018-2019 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed July 3, 2018.
  44. ^ District 5 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed July 3, 2018.
  45. ^ Johnson, Brent. "Yet another new lawmaker takes office in N.J.", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, July 2, 2018. Accessed July 3, 2018. "Former Camden councilman William Spearman was sworn in Saturday as the newest member of the state Assembly, replacing Arthur Barclay, who resigned last month amid assault charges stemming from a domestic violence incident."
  46. ^ Governor Phil Murphy, State of New Jersey. Accessed January 16, 2018.
  47. ^ Lieutenant Governor Oliver, State of New Jersey. Accessed January 16, 2018. "Assemblywoman Oliver has resided in the City of East Orange for over 40 years."
  48. ^ a b About the Freeholder Board, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  49. ^ Louis Cappelli Jr. , Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  50. ^ Edward T. McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  51. ^ Susan Shin Angulo, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  52. ^ William F. Moen Jr.l, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  53. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  54. ^ Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  55. ^ Jonathan L. Young Sr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  56. ^ County Clerk Joseph Ripa, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  57. ^ Members List: Clerks, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  58. ^ Sheriff Gilbert "Whip" Wilson, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  59. ^ Members List: Sheriffs, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  60. ^ Surrogate Michelle Gentek-Mayer, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  61. ^ Members List: Surrogates , Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  62. ^ Your Government, Camden County, New Jersey. Accesed June 6, 2018.
  63. ^ Prosecutor Mary Eva Colalillo, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  64. ^ Prosecutor's Bio, Office of the Camden County Prosecutor. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  65. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Camden, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  66. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Camden County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  67. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Camden County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  68. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  69. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  70. ^ "Governor - Camden County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  71. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Camden County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  72. ^ 2009 Governor: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  73. ^ "Sweeney to Press Plan To Get Towns To Merge; Share Services". NJ.com. NJ.com. Retrieved 10 April 2018. 
  74. ^ District information for Mt. Ephraim School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016.
  75. ^ School Data for the Mount Ephraim Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016.
  76. ^ Mary Bray Elementary School, Mount Ephraim Public Schools. Accessed July 19, 2017.
  77. ^ Raymond W. Kershaw Middle School, Mount Ephraim Public Schools. Accessed July 19, 2017.
  78. ^ Schools, Mount Ephraim Public Schools. Accessed July 19, 2017.
  79. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Mount Ephraim Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  80. ^ Nicolosi, Peggy. "Report on Non-Operating School District: Audubon Park", Camden County Executive County Superintendent, June 30, 2009. Accessed December 13, 2014. "In addition to students from Audubon Park, Audubon also receives high school students from Mount Ephraim Public Schools."
  81. ^ Rothschild, Barbara S. 'Educators say consolidating school districts doesn't add up'.html/_top "Educators say consolidating school districts doesn't add up", copy of article from Courier-Post, January 10, 2010. Accessed December 13, 2014. "Oaklyn is also considering a merge with K-12 Audubon, which already accepts students from Mount Ephraim and the nonoperating Audubon Park district."
  82. ^ School data for Audubon Junior/Senior High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 12, 2016.
  83. ^ Camden County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  84. ^ Camden County Bus/Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  85. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed December 13, 2014.
  86. ^ McPherson, Chris. "Dan Baker: The Man Behind The Voice", Philadelphia Eagles, September 6, 2014. Accessed February 16, 2018. "He was born at Woman's Hospital in the East Falls section of Philadelphia and raised on Springfield Avenue in Southwest Philadelphia before moving just across the Walt Whitman Bridge to Mount Ephraim, N.J. in his youth."

External links[edit]