Mount Storm King

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This article is about the mountain in Clallam County, Washington. For mountains with similar names, see Storm King Mountain.
Mount Storm King
Mount Storm King Feb2002.jpg
Highest point
Elevation 4,500+ft (1,370+m)  NGVD 29[1]
Prominence 750 ft (230 m) [1]
Coordinates 48°03′21″N 123°44′27″W / 48.055708811°N 123.740815125°W / 48.055708811; -123.740815125Coordinates: 48°03′21″N 123°44′27″W / 48.055708811°N 123.740815125°W / 48.055708811; -123.740815125[2]
Geography
Mount Storm King is located in Washington (state)
Mount Storm King
Mount Storm King
Parent range Olympic Mountains
Topo map USGS Lake Sutherland
Climbing
Easiest route Mount Storm King trail, class 3

Mount Storm King is located within the Olympic National Park about 20 miles west of Port Angeles, Washington. The mountain is located on the south side of Lake Crescent near Barnes Point, and has an elevation of 4,500+feet (1,370+m).

The trail to the summit starts near the Storm King Ranger Station, and initially follows the trail to Marymere Falls but branches to the north after a short distance. The first 1.9 miles (3.1 km) miles is on maintained trail but the rest of the climb involves scrambling on loose rock with some exposure.[3]

Taken June, 2006 on the summit trail. Lake Crescent is visible in the foreground, the Strait of Juan de Fuca in the background just over seven miles distant.

Legend[edit]

Klallum tribe legend tells an origin story of Mount Storm King being angered by fighting tribes at his feet and broke a boulder from his peak, throwing it at the warriors, killing them and cutting Tsulh-mut in two creating Lake Crescent and Lake Sutherland.[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mount Storm King, Washington". Peakbagger.com. 
  2. ^ "CON". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey. 
  3. ^ Molvar, Erik (2008). Hiking Olympic National Park (2nd ed.). Helena, Mont: Falcon. ISBN 0-7627-4119-8. 
  4. ^ "Our deep lakes incite curiosity and conjure legends". The Seattle Times. 2014-08-08. Retrieved 2017-01-21. 
  5. ^ Bragg, Lynn (2015). Washington Myths and Legends: The True Stories behind History’s Mysteries. Rowan & Littlefield. p. 59. ISBN 1493016032. 

External links[edit]