Mount Washington State Forest

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Mount Washington State Forest
Massachusetts State Forest
CT MA NY Boundary Marker on Mount Frissell Trail.jpg
The tri-state boundary marker
on the Mount Frissell Trail
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Berkshire
Town Mount Washington
Elevation 1,470 ft (448 m) [1]
Coordinates 42°08′30″N 73°28′28″W / 42.14167°N 73.47444°W / 42.14167; -73.47444Coordinates: 42°08′30″N 73°28′28″W / 42.14167°N 73.47444°W / 42.14167; -73.47444 [1]
Highest point Alander Mountain
 - elevation 2,231 ft (680 m) [2]
 - coordinates 42°05′15″N 73°30′18″W / 42.08750°N 73.50500°W / 42.08750; -73.50500
Area 4,619 acres (1,869 ha) [3]
Established 1958
Management Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation
Location in Massachusetts
Website: Mount Washington State Forest

Mount Washington State Forest is a publicly owned forest with recreational and scenic features covering 4,619 acres (1,869 ha) in the town of Mount Washington, Massachusetts. The forest conjoins with New York state and the state of Connecticut in the southern Taconic Mountains of the southwestern Berkshire region of Massachusetts. Bash Bish Falls State Park lies adjacent to the state forest. The forest is managed by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.[4]

History[edit]

The forest was acquired by the state through gifts of Alfred F. Intemann (1897-1986) and his wife Cornelia Van der Smissen Intemann (who died in 1963) conveyed in 1958, 1959, 1961, and 1968.[5]

Features[edit]

The forest protects 300 acres (120 ha) of old growth northern hardwood forest in separate areas.[6][7] The tri-state boundary stone on the Mount Frissell Trail marks Massachusett's southwest and Connecticut's northwest corners. The names of Massachusetts and New York are engraved in the stone, with Connecticut "graffiti" on the granite.

Activities and amenities[edit]

The forest has 30 miles of trails including portions of the Appalachian Trail and the South Taconic Trail, which ascends Alander Mountain. Trails are used for hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, and cross-country skiing. The forest also offers restrooms, picnicking, fishing, restricted hunting, and primitive wilderness camping.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mount Washington State Forest". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. 
  2. ^ "Alander Mountain". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. 
  3. ^ "2012 Acreage Listing" (PDF). Department of Conservation and Recreation. April 2012. Retrieved January 19, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Mount Washington State Forest". MassParks. Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs. Retrieved July 21, 2013. 
  5. ^ "A Guide to Related Archival Collections" (PDF). Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation. June 9, 2015. p. 135. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  6. ^ Davis, Mary Byrd (January 23, 2008). "Massachusetts" (PDF). Old Growth in the East: A Survey. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 19, 2011. Retrieved August 28, 2013. 
  7. ^ See the list of old-growth forests in Massachusetts for details.

External links[edit]