Mountain Lakes, New Jersey

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Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Borough of Mountain Lakes
Mountain Lakes Historic District
Mountain Lakes Historic District
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°53′27″N 74°26′31″W / 40.890853°N 74.442032°W / 40.890853; -74.442032Coordinates: 40°53′27″N 74°26′31″W / 40.890853°N 74.442032°W / 40.890853; -74.442032[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
IncorporatedApril 29, 1924
Government
 • TypeFaulkner Act (council–manager)
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorThomas Menard (D, term ends December 31, 2022)[3][4]
 • ManagerMitchell Stern[5]
 • Municipal clerkMitchell Stern (acting)[6]
Area
 • Total2.91 sq mi (7.53 km2)
 • Land2.64 sq mi (6.85 km2)
 • Water0.27 sq mi (0.69 km2)  9.11%
 • Rank340th of 565 in state
27th of 39 in county[1]
Elevation489 ft (149 m)
Population
 • Total4,472
 • Rank406th of 566 in state
33rd of 39 in county[11]
 • Density1,691.38/sq mi (653.05/km2)
  • Rank327th of 566 in state
18th of 39 in county[11]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)973[14]
FIPS code3402748480[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID0885310[1][17]
Websitewww.mtnlakes.org
Mountain Lakes Historic District
Mountain Lakes, New Jersey is located in Morris County, New Jersey
Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
LocationRoughly bounded by Pocono Road, Denville Township line, Fanny Road, and RR Tracks, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Area1,397 acres (565 ha)
Built1908
ArchitectHapgood, Herbert J.; Holton, Arthur T.
Architectural styleLate 19th And Early 20th Century American Movements, Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals
NRHP reference No.05000963[18]
Added to NRHPSeptember 7, 2005

Mountain Lakes is a borough in Morris County, New Jersey, United States, and a suburb of New York City.[19] As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,160,[20][21][22] reflecting a decline of 96 (−2.3%) from the 4,256 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 409 (+10.6%) from the 3,847 counted in the 1990 Census.[23]

Originally a planned community, the borough was named for a pair of lakes which served to distinguish Mountain Lakes as "the first year-round residential lake community in northwestern New Jersey."[24] Mountain Lakes was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 3, 1924, from portions of Boonton Township and Hanover Township, subject to the results of a referendum passed on April 29, 1924.[25][26][27]

The borough has been one of the state's highest-income communities.[28][29][30] In the 2013–2017 American Community Survey, Mountain Lakes had a median household income of $175,556 (ranked 12th in the state) and included 45.6% of households earning more than $200,000 annually.[31][32]

In 2010, Forbes.com listed Mountain Lakes as 210th in its listing of "America's Most Expensive ZIP Codes", with a median home price of $1,045,401.[33]

Mountain Lakes ranked among the highest annual property tax bills in New Jersey, and was the highest in Morris County, at $20,471 in 2018, compared to a statewide average of $8,767.[34] New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Mountain Lakes as the 26th best place to live in New Jersey in its rankings of the "New Jersey's Top Towns 2011–2012" in New Jersey.[35]

Mountain Lakes station is the first train station heading eastbound not concurrent with the nearby Morristown Line. NJ Transit offers service on the Montclair-Boonton Line.[36]

History[edit]

Town founder Herbert Hapgood
Example of Hapgood home located on Boulevard
Mountain Lakes Historic Preservation Committee will assist homeowners interested in displaying an historic plaque on their Hapgood Home

Grimes Homestead is an 18th-century historic home that served as a way station on the Underground Railroad.[37]

Mountain Lakes was originally a planned community, founded in 1910 by Herbert Hapgood. The entire face of the community changed from a wilderness of Dutch and English properties to a planned suburban community of large stucco houses now affectionately known as "Hapgoods." During this single decade, the natural and architectural character of Mountain Lakes was developed. Hapgood was particularly influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement, at the height of its popularity in 1910 when he started building.[38]

Lawrence W. Luellen, inventor of the Dixie Cup, became the community's first resident when he moved to his new home in March 1911.[39][40]

The Hapgood model homes were early forerunners of the modern development, but each house was modified to suit individual tastes. To the basic styles of these houses, Hapgood added colonial and craftsman features. He reversed floor plans, and interchanged architectural details. By the end of 1912, two hundred Hapgood homes were sold and occupied and in 1914 saw the formation of the Mountain Lakes Club. By 1923, approximately six hundred stucco houses were built to meet the overwhelming demand. Mountain Lakes became an independent municipality in 1924.[41]

The United States Navy's Underwater Sound Reference Laboratories was located in Mountain Lakes during World War II.[42]

Mountain Lakes had a discriminatory "gentleman's agreement" from its inception up through the 1960s, preventing African-Americans, Jews, Latinos, Catholics, and other "undesirable groupings"[43] from living there.[44][45][46] While this was abandoned in recent years, the town still has a less diverse population than the rest of New Jersey, or Morris County.[44]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.91 square miles (7.53 km2), including 2.64 square miles (6.84 km2) of land and 0.27 square miles (0.69 km2) of water (9.11%).[1][2]

Part of The Tourne county park is in Mountain Lakes.[47]

The borough borders Parsippany-Troy Hills, to the east and south, the town of Boonton to the northeast, Boonton Township to the northwest and Denville to the west all of which are located in Morris County.[48][49][50]

Lakes[edit]

Man-made lakes in Mountain Lakes include Birchwood Lake, Crystal Lake, Mountain Lake, Shadow Lake, Sunset Lake, Wildwood Lake, and Cove Lake. There are town private swimming beaches in Birchwood Lake, and Mountain Lake. The Mountain Lakes Club is located on the northern end of Mountain Lake.

Beaches are open from sunrise to sunset[51] and facilities are available between the hours of 10 AM to 6 PM every day between the months of June and August with a beach badge purchased at the borough hall.[52] Beach badges are available to Mountain Lakes residents only.[53]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19302,132
19402,2053.4%
19502,80627.3%
19604,03743.9%
19704,73917.4%
19804,153−12.4%
19903,847−7.4%
20004,25610.6%
20104,160−2.3%
20204,4727.5%
Population sources:1930[54]
1930–1990[55] 2000[56][57] 2010[20][21][22]
[10]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 4,160 people, 1,313 households, and 1,144 families in the borough. The population density was 1,590.3 per square mile (614.0/km2). There were 1,363 housing units at an average density of 521.1 per square mile (201.2/km2). The racial makeup was 89.57% (3,726) White, 0.36% (15) Black or African American, 0.07% (3) Native American, 7.64% (318) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.34% (14) from other races, and 2.02% (84) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.55% (106) of the population.[20]

Of the 1,313 households, 53.3% had children under the age of 18; 78.9% were married couples living together; 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present and 12.9% were non-families. Of all households, 11.3% were made up of individuals and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.44.[20]

34.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 16.8% from 25 to 44, 33.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females, the population had 99.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 93.5 males.[20]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $155,139 (with a margin of error of +/− $20,127) and the median family income was $181,600 (+/− $26,906). Males had a median income of $144,688 (+/− $24,336) versus $77,734 (+/− $26,273) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $75,525 (+/− $11,503). About 2.1% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[58]

Based on data from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey, Mountain Lakes had a per capita income of $75,525 (ranked 17th in the state), compared to per capita income in Morris County of $47,342 and statewide of $34,858.[59]

According to The New York Times, a diverse group of foreigners have been moving to the borough, including Germans, Chinese, South Africans, and New Zealanders.[60]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 4,256 people, 1,330 households, and 1,186 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,593.0 people per square mile (615.4/km2). There were 1,357 housing units at an average density of 507.9 per square mile (196.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.05% White, 0.38% African American, 5.17% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.52% from other races, and 0.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.69% of the population.[56][57]

There were 1,330 households, out of which 53.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 83.3% were married couples living together, 3.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 10.8% were non-families. 9.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.20 and the average family size was 3.41.[56][57]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 35.7% under the age of 18, 3.1% from 18 to 24, 23.4% from 25 to 44, 28.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.0 males.[56][57]

The median income for a household in the borough was $141,757, and the median income for a family was $153,227. Males had a median income of $100,000+ versus $61,098 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $65,086. About 1.4% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.7% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.[56][57]

Mountain Lakes was ranked in 2000 as the 13th highest-income community in the state of New Jersey based on per capita income, after having been ranked eighth a decade earlier. In 2000, the township's median household income ranked third in the state and the highest in Morris County. Per capita income increased by 25.4% from the previous census, with income growth ranked 530th among the state's 566 municipalities.[61]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Mountain Lakes operates within the Faulkner Act, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, under the Council-Manager form of municipal government (Plan E), implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of January 1, 1975.[62] The borough is one of 42 municipalities (of the 564) statewide that use this form of government.[63] The Borough Council is comprised of seven members, who are elected at-large for staggered four-year terms of office on a partisan basis, with either three or four seats coming up for vote as part of the November general election in even-numbered years. The Mayor and Deputy Mayor are chosen by the members of the Council from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each year during the first week in January.[3][7]

As of 2022, members of the Mountain Lakes Borough Council are Mayor Thomas Menard (D, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2022), Deputy mayor Khizar Sheikh (D, term on committee ends 2024; term as deputy mayor ends 2022), Lauren Barnett (D, 2024), Daniel J. Happer (R, 2022), Cynthia Korman (D, 2024), Audrey B. Lane (R, 2022) and Chris Richter (R, 2024).[3][64][65][66][67][68]

In 2018, the borough had an average property tax bill of $20,471, the highest in the county, compared to an average bill of $8,767 statewide.[69]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Mountain Lakes is located in the 11th Congressional District[70] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[21][71][72]

For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Mikie Sherrill (D, Montclair).[73] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[74] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[75][76]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony M. Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and in the General Assembly by Brian Bergen (R, Denville Township) and Aura K. Dunn (R, Mendham Borough).[77]

Morris County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners comprised of seven members who are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either one or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election.[78] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[79]: 8  As of 2022, Morris County's Commissioners are Commissioner Director Tayfun Selen (R, Chatham Township, term as commissioner ends December 31, 2023; term as director ends 2022),[80] Commissioner Deputy Director John Krickus (R, Washington Township, term as commissioner ends 2024; term as deputy director ends 2022),[81] Douglas Cabana (R, Boonton Township, 2022),[82] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (R, Roxbury, 2022),[83] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (R, Montville, 2022),[84] Stephen H. Shaw (R, Mountain Lakes, 2024)[85] and Deborah Smith (R, Denville, 2024).[86][79]: 2 [87] The county's constitutional officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[88] As of 2022, they are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (R, Parsippany–Troy Hills, 2023),[89][90] Sheriff James M. Gannon (R, Boonton Township, 2022)[91][92] and Surrogate Heather Darling (R, Roxbury, 2024).[93][94]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,964 registered voters in Mountain Lakes, of which 715 (24.1%) were registered as Democrats, 975 (32.9%) were registered as Republicans and 1,271 (42.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered as Libertarians or Greens.[95]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 58.0% of the vote (1,262 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 41.1% (893 votes), and other candidates with 0.9% (19 votes), among the 2,184 ballots cast by the borough's 3,125 registered voters (10 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 69.9%.[96][97] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 49.2% of the vote (1,177 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 49.1% (1,173 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (27 votes), among the 2,391 ballots cast by the borough's 3,103 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.1%.[98] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 55.1% of the vote (1,299 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 43.6% (1,027 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (21 votes), among the 2,356 ballots cast by the borough's 3,018 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 78.1.[99]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 71.4% of the vote (935 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 26.6% (349 votes), and other candidates with 2.0% (26 votes), among the 1,325 ballots cast by the borough's 3,036 registered voters (15 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 43.6%.[100][101] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 57.1% of the vote (937 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 32.3% (530 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.0% (164 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (6 votes), among the 1,642 ballots cast by the borough's 3,024 registered voters, yielding a 54.3% turnout.[102]

Education[edit]

The Mountain Lakes Schools serve public school students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade.[103] As of the 2020–21 school year, the district, comprised of four schools, had an enrollment of 1,348 students and 146.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.2:1.[104] Schools in the district (with 2020–21 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[105]) are Wildwood Elementary School[106] with 428 students in grades K–5, Briarcliff Middle School[107] with 281 students in grades 6–8, Mountain Lakes High School[108] with 641 students in grades 9–12 and Lake Drive School, a regional school for deaf and hard of hearing students from birth through high school, with students from nearly 100 communities in 12 New Jersey counties.[109] with 57 students in grades Pre-K–8.[110][111][112] Students from Boonton Township attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[113] The school was the 7th-ranked public high school in New Jersey out of 328 schools statewide in New Jersey Monthly magazine's September 2012 cover story on the state's "Top Public High Schools", after being ranked 9th in 2010 out of 322 schools listed.[114]

Mountain Lakes is also home to The Craig School, a private coeducational day school serving students in second through twelfth grade. The school has an enrollment of 130 students split between the Lower/Middle School (grades 2–8), located in Mountain Lakes, and the High School (grades 9–12), in Boonton.[115]

According to Neighborhood Scout, Mountain Lakes is one of New Jersey's most highly educated municipalities, with 85.94% of adults attaining a four-year undergraduate or graduate degree, quadruple the national average of 21.84%, while the percentage of white-collar workers was 98.77%.[116]

Transportation[edit]

US 46 westbound in Mountain Lakes

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 29.38 miles (47.28 km) of roadways, of which 25.86 miles (41.62 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.32 miles (3.73 km) by Morris County and 1.20 miles (1.93 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[117]

U.S. Route 46 is the main highway directly serving Mountain Lakes.[118] No other significant roads enter the borough. However, Interstate 80 and Interstate 287 both pass just outside the borough in neighboring Parsippany–Troy Hills.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit offers train service at the Mountain Lakes station[36] on the Montclair-Boonton Line to Hoboken Terminal and to Pennsylvania Station in Midtown Manhattan via Midtown Direct through Newark Broad Street Station.[119][120]

Lakeland Bus Lines provides service along Route 46 operating between Dover and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[121][122]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Mountain Lakes include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Borough Council, Borough of Mountain Lakes. Accessed June 11, 2022. "The Borough Council of the Borough of Mountain Lakes consists of 7 elected officials. Council Members are elected for 4 year terms from the population at large. The Mayor and Deputy Mayor are chosen from within the Council by the Council at the Reorganization meeting the first week in January."
  4. ^ 2022 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed March 1, 2022.
  5. ^ Borough Manager, Borough of Mountain Lakes. Accessed June 11, 2022.
  6. ^ Municipal Clerk, Borough of Mountain Lakes. Accessed June 11, 2022.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 116.
  8. ^ "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 11, 2022.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Mountain Lakes, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  10. ^ a b "Census Population API". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 11, 2022.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Mountain Lakes, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Mountain Lakes, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  15. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  17. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  19. ^ "Real Estate Listings".
  20. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Mountain Lakes borough, Morris County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  21. ^ a b c Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  22. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Mountain Lakes borough Archived 2013-07-23 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  23. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  24. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 8, 2015.
  25. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 195. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  26. ^ Historical Timeline of Morris County Boundaries, Morris County Library. Accessed December 24, 2016. "1924, March 3. Mountain Lakes Borough is established from Boonton and Hanover Township."
  27. ^ National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet for Mountain Lakes Historic District, Borough of Mountain Lakes. Accessed December 25, 2016. "The independent Borough of Mountain Lakes, incorporated on Feb 26, 1924, acted decisively with the development company to retain the character of Mountain Lakes as a residential park."
  28. ^ Mountain Lakes, NJ, NeighborhoodScout. Accessed March 29, 2020. "The per capita income in Mountain Lakes in 2010 was $84,741, which is wealthy relative to New Jersey and the nation."
  29. ^ O'Dea, Colleen. "The List: Dozen ‘Smartest’ Towns in New Jersey", NJ Spotlight. Accessed March 29, 2020. "Mountain Lakes: Advanced education typically correlates with wealth and socioeconomic status. This borough in Morris County was the richest, with a median household income of more than $216,000, according to the five-year 2018 American Community Survey."
  30. ^ Davis, Tom. "25 Wealthiest Zip Codes In New Jersey; What are the 25 wealthiest zip codes in New Jersey? The list is below.", Mendham-Chester, NJ Patch, July 4, 2016. Accessed March 29, 2020. "Here are the 25 wealthiest zip codes in New Jersey, with each zip code's average household income:... 2. Mountain Lakes, $249,225"
  31. ^ Cervenka, Susanne. "Rich in New Jersey: Here are the 50 wealthiest towns in the state. Is yours one of them?", Asbury Park Press, July 1, 2019. Accessed July 19, 2022. "12. Mountain Lakes _ County: Morris County; Median household income: $175,556; Percent making more than $200,000: 45.6%"
  32. ^ Mountain Lakes 2017 Census Data Summary, Archived March 29, 2020, at the Wayback Machine Morris County, New Jersey Office of Planning and Preservation. Accessed July 19, 2022.
  33. ^ Staff. "America's Most Expensive ZIP Codes: In these neighborhoods $4 million homes are the norm.", Forbes, September 27, 2010. Accessed July 29, 2011.
  34. ^ "These are the towns with the highest property taxes in each of N.J.'s 21 counties", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, April 22, 2019. Accessed July 19, 2022. "The average property tax bill in Mountain Lakes Borough was $20,471 in 2018, the highest in Morris County."
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  39. ^ Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Mountain Lakes, N.J.;A 20's Community Frozen in Time", The New York Times, July 28, 1996. Accessed August 26, 2021. "The first family to move into Mountain Lakes, in 1911, was that of Lawrence W. Luellen, founder of the Lily Paper Cup Company."
  40. ^ Mountain Lakes Historic District Statement of Significance, National Register of Historic Places. Accessed August 26, 2021. "Lawrence W. Luellen and his family became the first residents of Mountain Lakes to live in a Hapgood-built house when, on St. Patrick's Day 1911, they moved to 46 Dartmouth Road."
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  52. ^ Forrest, Cindy. "Mountain Lakes Council considers beach badge age change", Neighbor News (Boonton), May 4, 2012. Accessed October 24, 2013. "If passed, the amended law would require a tag for "all residents 2 years of age or older desiring to use facilities at Island Beach, Birchwood Beach and borough-owned lakes between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. between Memorial Day and Labor Day.'"
  53. ^ "Borough of Mountain Lakes".
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  58. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Mountain Lakes borough, Morris County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 17, 2012.
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