Nothofagus solandri var. cliffortioides

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Mountain beech)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Nothofagus solandri var. cliffortioides
Mountain-Beech-tree.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
(unranked):
(unranked):
(unranked):
Order:
Family:
Genus:
Species:
F. cliffortioides
Binomial name
Fuscospora cliffortioides
(Hook.f.) Heenan & Smissen[1]
Synonyms[2]
  • Fagus cliffortioides Hook.f.
  • Nothofagus cliffortioides (Hook.f.) Oerst.
  • Nothofagus solandri var. cliffortioides (Hook.f.) Poole

Nothofagus solandri var. cliffortioides, commonly called mountain beech (Māori: tawhai rauriki), is a species of Southern beech tree and is endemic to New Zealand. Mountain beech grows in mountainous regions at high altitudes. In New Zealand the taxon is called Fuscospora cliffortioides.[3]

Mountain Beech grows to around 20 metres[4] but near the treeline forms a "goblin forest" where the trees are no more than 2m tall. It also has leaves that are elongated and have a pointed end.

Hybrids[edit]

  • Mountain Beech is known to hybridise freely with black beech (Nothofagus solandri var. solandri) where the two species co-exist,and in some places the hybrids may form complex introgressive hybrid swarms.[5]
  • Mountain Beech also hybridises with red beech (Nothofagus fusca) to form the hybrid species Nothofagus ×blairii.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hogan, C. Michael (ed). "Fuscospora cliffortioides". Encyclopedia of Life. Retrieved 15 January 2016.
  2. ^ "Fuscospora cliffortioides (Hook.f.) Heenan & Smissen". Flora of New Zealand. Landcare Research 2010-2015. Retrieved 15 January 2016.
  3. ^ a b HEENAN, PETER B.; SMISSEN, ROB D. (2013). "Revised circumscription of Nothofagus and recognition of the segregate genera Fuscospora, Lophozonia, and Trisyngyne (Nothofagaceae)". Phytotaxa. 146 (1): 131. doi:10.11646/phytotaxa.146.1.1. Retrieved 31 May 2015.
  4. ^ "Mountain Beech Height". Details of our range of Beech variety. Southern Woods Nursery Ltd.
  5. ^ "Fuscospora cliffortioides". New Zealand Plant Conservation Network. Retrieved 31 May 2015.

External links[edit]