Movieguide Awards

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The Movieguide Awards
Awarded forPromotion of Christian values[1]
CountryUnited States
Presented byMovieguide
First awardedFebruary 10, 1993; 26 years ago (1993-02-10)
Websitemovieguideawards.com

The Movieguide Awards is an annual award ceremony for Christian and family-friendly entertainment held every year in Hollywood and broadcast on the Hallmark Channel around the same time as the Academy Awards. The awards are commonly described as "The Christian Oscars" in industry circles.[1]

History[edit]

In 1985 Ted Baehr of the Christian Film & Television Commission created Movieguide a family guide to movies and entertainment. In 1988 conversations began with Sir John Templeton resulting in the Annual Movieguide Faith & Values Awards Gala debuting in 1993 with funding from the John Templeton Foundation.[2][3]

Since then, Movieguide’s Annual Faith & Values Awards Gala has grown into a televised event that has been hosted by such celebrities as Terry Crews, Chuck Norris, Sadie Robertson, Bill Engvall, and Joe Mantegna.

In 2014, The New Yorker noted that the Movieguide Awards have become more politicized following funding from the right-wing lobbyists.[1]

Awards[edit]

The Epiphany Prize[edit]

The two Epiphany Prizes for Inspiring Movies & TV are specifically for entertaining movies and television programs that are wholesome, spiritually uplifting and inspirational.[4][5]

Epiphany Prize for Inspiring Movies winners[edit]

Year Winning Film
1996
(4th)
Dead Man Walking
1997
(5th)
The Preacher's Wife
1998
(6th)
Amistad
1999
(7th)
The Prince of Egypt
2000
(8th)
The Winslow Boy
2001
(9th)
Return to Me
2002
(10th)
The Body
2003
(11th)
Evelyn
2004
(12th)
The Gospel of John
2005
(13th)
The Passion of the Christ
2006
(14th)
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
2007
(15th)
The Nativity Story
2008
(16th)
Amazing Grace
2009
(17th)
Fireproof
2010
(18th)
The Blind Side
2011
(19th)
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
2012
(20th)
Courageous
2013
(21st)
Les Misérables
2014
(22nd)
Grace Unplugged
2015
(23rd)
God's Not Dead
2016
(24th)
War Room
The 33
Brooklyn
Captive
Do You Believe?
Manny
Woodlawn
2017
(25th)
The Young Messiah
Ben-Hur
God's Not Dead 2
Hacksaw Ridge
Hail, Caesar!
Miracles from Heaven
Risen
Silence
2018
(26th)
The Star
All Saints
Bitter Harvest
The Boss Baby
The Case for Christ
Let There Be Light
The Promise
2019
(27th)
I Can Only Imagine
God's Not Dead: A Light in Darkness
Paul, Apostle of Christ
The Grinch (2018 film)
Unbroken: Path to Redemption

The Faith and Freedom Award[edit]

The Faith & Freedom Award for Movies & TV is awarded to entertainment that promotes positive American values. The values considered include such values such as liberty, religious freedom, freedom of speech, the right to vote, property rights, proper compassion for others, protection of the innocent, the right to due process, the right to life, the right to pursue happiness, the rule of law, democracy, the free market, ownership of private property, and many other traditional values.

Best Movies for Families[edit]

Movieguide’s editorial staff views and analyzes every major movie released that makes over $1 million and compiles the Ten Best Movies for Families. Each nominee receives a “Teddy ‘The Good News’ Bear” Family Friendly Awards for Excellence, and one is picked as the Best Movie for Families at the Annual Movieguide Awards.

Best Movies for Mature Audiences[edit]

The nominees for Best Movies for Mature Audiences are picked by the editorial staff of Movieguide, and awarded to movies made with excellence, and also contain strong moral and redemptive themes. These nominees receive the “Papa Bear” Award for Excellence, and may contain subject matter not appropriate for young children.

The Grace Award for Acting[edit]

The Grace Award for Most Inspiring Performances in Movies and Television are given to the best, most inspiring performances demonstrating God’s grace and love towards us as humans being.

The Kairos Prize[edit]

Established by Movieguide in 2005, the purpose of the Kairos Prize for Beginning and Established Screenwriters is to further the influence of moral and spiritual values within the film and television industries. Seeking to promote a spiritually uplifting, redemptive worldview, the prize was founded to inspire first-time and beginning screenwriters to produce compelling, entertaining, spiritually uplifting scripts that result in a greater increase in either man’s love or understanding of God. Each year, at least $30,000 in prizes is given out to the winning screenwriters.

The 2017 film All Saints from Sony Pictures was the first Kairos Prize Finalist to be released nationwide by a major studio.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Sweet, Sam (February 7, 2014). "The Christian Oscars". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2019-04-09.
  2. ^ DeFazio, Jeanne C.; Spencer, William David (3 May 2016). "Redeeming the Screens: Living Stories of Media "Ministers" Bringing the Message of Jesus Christ to the Entertainment Industry". Wipf and Stock Publishers – via Google Books.
  3. ^ Cook, Dr Bruce (1 October 2013). "Aligning With The Apostolic, Volume 5: Apostles And The Apostolic Movement In The Seven Mountains Of Culture". Whitaker House – via Google Books.
  4. ^ "Movieguide® and the Annual Faith & Values Awards Gala and Report to the Entertainment Industry featuring the Epiphany, Kairos, and Chronos Prizes - John Templeton Foundation". templeton.org.
  5. ^ "Movieguide Awards Archives -". dollyparton.com.

External links[edit]