Moya Dodd

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Moya Dodd
Born (1965-04-30) 30 April 1965 (age 53)
Adelaide, South Australia
NationalityAustralian
Alma materUniversity of Adelaide (LLB (Hons) 1988)[1]
University of NSW (MBA 1996)
OccupationLawyer
Board member ofFootball Federation Australia (2007–2017)
Asian Football Confederation (2009–)
FIFA (2013–2016)
Association football career
Playing position Midfield
Youth career
1979–1981 Port Adelaide
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1982–1988 Adelaide University
National team
1985–1995  Australia 24 (1)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Moya Dodd (born 30 April 1965) is an Australian football official, former national team player, and lawyer. She is a executive committee member of the Asian Football Confederation (AFC)[2] and a former member of the FIFA Council.[3]

Football administration career[edit]

Dodd joined the board of Football Federation Australia in 2007.[4] In 2009, she was elected as a vice-president of the Asian Football Confederation.[2][5]

In 2013, she was appointed to the executive committee of FIFA, the 27-member body which governs football, in 2013 as a co-opted member.[3]

Playing career[edit]

Dodd played 24 times for Australia, including 12 in full international matches.[6][7]

Legal career[edit]

Moya is a partner in law firm Gilbert + Tobin.[8]

Honours and awards[edit]

In 2016, Dodd was named the overall winner of the 2016 Australian Financial Review and Westpac 100 Women of Influence Awards.[9] In 2018 Forbes ranked her Number 7 in their list of Most Powerful Women in International Sports.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Moya Dodd is first Australian representative on FIFA". University of Adelaide. Retrieved 11 December 2014.
  2. ^ a b "AFC Executive Committee". The Asian Football Confederation. Retrieved 10 December 2014.
  3. ^ a b "Moya Dodd scores for women's soccer". The Sydney Morning Herald. 30 May 2014. Retrieved 10 December 2014.
  4. ^ Smithies, Tom (15 May 2007). "Lowy shakes up soccer board". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 5 October 2012. Retrieved 1 June 2011.
  5. ^ "FFA welcomes outcome in Asia". Football Federation Australia. 8 May 2009. Archived from the original on 11 October 2012. Retrieved 1 June 2011.
  6. ^ "Teams of the Decades – Women's 1990–1999". Football Federation Australia. 21 December 2013. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  7. ^ Howe, Andrew. "Official Media Guide of Australia at the FIFA Women's World Cup Germany 2011" (PDF). Football Federation Australia. p. 53. Retrieved 26 April 2017 – via WomenSoccer.com.au.
  8. ^ Merritt, Chris (27 June 2008). "G+T beats the benchmark for promoting women". The Australian. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2011.
  9. ^ Stewart, Claire (28 October 2016). "Global aims drive winners". Australian Financial Review.
  10. ^ Settimi, Christina. "Moya Dodd, One Of Soccer's Most Powerful Women, Isn't Done Playing". Forbes. Retrieved 2018-03-29.

External links[edit]