Mudge Rose Guthrie Alexander & Ferdon

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Mudge Rose Guthrie Alexander & Ferdon[1] was a prominent New York City law firm tracing its origin back to 1869.[2][3][4] Earlier known as : Mudge, Stern, Baldwin & Todd; later : Nixon, Mudge, Rose, Guthrie, & Alexander;[5] later : Nixon, Mudge, Rose, Guthrie, Alexander & Mitchell;[6] then : Mudge, Rose, Guthrie & Alexander. The firm is known best as the legal launching pad of Richard Nixon.[7]

The firm employed some 190 lawyers at the time of dissolution in 1995. Among problems that ultimately destroyed the firm were a long internal fight for leadership, management, and significant client defections. [7][2]

Notable alumni and employees[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Torry, Saundra (22 November 1993). "Leonard Garment finds a challenge in expansion puzzle". Retrieved 22 July 2017 – via washingtonpost.com.
  2. ^ a b "Lawyers: The Factories". Time magazine. 24 January 1964. Retrieved 22 July 2017 – via time.com.
  3. ^ Galbraith, John Kenneth (30 July 1973). "How the Great New York Lawyers let us Down". New York Magazine. New York Media, LLC. Retrieved 22 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  4. ^ "The Personal Papers of John Kenneth Galbraith (1908-2006)". citeseerx.ist.psu.edu. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  5. ^ "Milton C. Rose, 97, Lawyer At Firm of Nixon and Mitchell". The New York Times. 21 March 2002. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  6. ^ Strong, Thomas (1 November 2012). "Strong Advocate: The Life of a Trial Lawyer". University of Missouri Press. Retrieved 22 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  7. ^ a b Goldberg, Carey (1 October 1995). "The Mudge Rose Firm Enters the Tar Pit of Legal History". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 29 September 2014.
  8. ^ FEB. 21, 1971 (1971-02-21). "Shelley Scarney And Nixon Aide. Plan to Marry - The New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  9. ^ Catholic University of America (2011). "A Life in Law, A Life of Service". Columbus School of Law. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  10. ^ MARCH 9, 1979 (1979-03-09). "Business and the Law - The New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  11. ^ "In Search of Deep Throat". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  12. ^ Garment, Leonard (25 October 2001). "Crazy Rhythm: From Brooklyn And Jazz To Nixon's White House, Watergate, And Beyond". Da Capo Press, Incorporated. Retrieved 22 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  13. ^ Paul Moorehead (July 22, 2013). "Radical Enlightenment: The Man Behind Nixon's Federal Indian Policy". Indian Country Media Network. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  14. ^ Sheldon Kurtz, Professor of Law, University of Iowa College of Law
  15. ^ "Franklin B. Lincoln, Aide in Transition Of Nixon, Dies at 85". The New York Times. 5 November 1993. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  16. ^ By LESLEY OELSNERMAY 11, 1973 (1973-05-11). "A Time of Trouble Looms for Mitchell Firm - The New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  17. ^ Mintz, Morton (30 August 1977). "Law Firm Accused of Aiding One Client Over Another". Washington Post. Retrieved 22 July 2017 – via washingtonpost.com.
  18. ^ MAY 12, 1973 (1973-05-12). "Mitchell Takes Leave From His Law Office - The New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  19. ^ By FRED P. GRAHAMFEB. 16, 1972 (1972-02-16). "Mitchell Quits; Nomination Goes To Kleindienst - The New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  20. ^ Reeves, Richard (20 December 1971). "Mitchell Redux". New York Magazine. New York Media, LLC. Retrieved 22 July 2017 – via Google Books.
  21. ^ Staff and Wire Reports (10 November 1988). "John Mitchell, Key Watergate Figure, Dies at 75". Retrieved 22 July 2017 – via LA Times.
  22. ^ By TOM GOLDSTEINSEPT. 20, 1975 (1975-09-20). "Court Rejects a Nixon Bid To Resign From State Bar - The New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  23. ^ By TOM GOLDSTEINJULY 9, 1976 (1976-07-09). "New York Court Disbars Nixon for Watergate Acts - The New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  24. ^ "In Memoriam – Summer 2002 Bulletin - Harvard Law Today". harvard.edu. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  25. ^ "Donald Robinson". nd55.org. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  26. ^ "Paid Notice: Deaths: ROBINSON, DONALD J." 22 June 2014. Retrieved 22 July 2017 – via NYTimes.com.
  27. ^ Judge Frank E. Schwelb, District of Columbia Court of Appeals Archived 2012-05-21 at the Wayback Machine
  28. ^ SEPT. 24, 1975 (1975-09-24). "Ex‐Law Partner Denies He Worked On 1969 Nixon Tax - The New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  29. ^ Groer, Annie; Gerhart, Ann (12 December 1995). "* THE RELIABLE SOURCE: The Lawyers' Tricky Last Words". Retrieved 22 July 2017 – via washingtonpost.com.

External links[edit]