Muhamed Kreševljaković

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Muhamed Kreševljaković
31st Mayor of Sarajevo
In office
December 1990 – April 1994
Preceded byJuraj Martinović
Succeeded byTarik Kupusović
Personal details
Born(1939-07-16)16 July 1939
Sarajevo, Kingdom of Yugoslavia
Died5 December 2001(2001-12-05) (aged 62)
Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Political partySDA
RelationsHamdija Kreševljaković (father)
Alma materUniversity of Sarajevo

Muhamed Kreševljaković (16 July 1939 – 5 December 2001) was a Bosnian politician who served as the Mayor of Sarajevo from 1990–94. He was mayor when the Bosnian War broke out in 1992 and for the first two years of the Siege of Sarajevo.

Family[edit]

Kreševljaković was the son of Hamdija Kreševljaković, a historian, and Razija (née Ćorović). His paternal grandfather Mehmed (died 1929), was the son of Ibrahim Kreševljaković.

Mayor of Sarajevo (1990–94)[edit]

Kreševljaković was elected Mayor of Sarajevo in the December 1990 elections.[1]

Siege of Sarajevo[edit]

American writer Susan Sontag gained attention for directing a production of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot in a candlelit Sarajevo theatre in the city, that Kevin Myers in the Daily Telegraph called "mesmerisingly precious and hideously self-indulgent." Myers wrote, "By my personal reckoning, the performance lasted as long as the siege itself."[2] However, many of Sarajevo's besieged residents disagreed:

To the people of Sarajevo, Ms. Sontag has become a symbol, interviewed frequently by the local newspapers and television, invited to speak at gatherings everywhere, asked for autographs on the street. After the opening performance of the play, the city's Mayor, Muhamed Kreševljaković, came onstage to declare her an honorary citizen, the only foreigner other than the recently departed United Nations commander, Lieut. Gen. Phillippe Morillon, to be so named.[3] "It is for your bravery, in coming here, living here, and working with us," he said.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sarajevo: biografija grada" (PDF). IIS. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 March 2016. Retrieved 2 April 2016.
  2. ^ Personal View (2 January 2005). "I wish I had kicked Susan Sontag". London: Telegraph. Retrieved 2 April 2016.
  3. ^ "To Sarajevo, Writer Brings Good Will and 'Godot'". New York Times. 19 August 1993. Retrieved 2 April 2016.