Muhammad Hassan (Brunei)

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Muhammad Hassan
10th Sultan of Brunei
Reign 1582 CE - 1598 CE (death)[citation needed]
Predecessor Shah Berunai
Successor Abdul Jalilul Akbar
Issue Abdul Jalilul Akbar, Sultan Tengah
Father Saiful Rijal
Religion Sunni Islam

Sultan Muhammad Hassan was the tenth sultan of Brunei. He reigned from 1582 to 1598. His predecessor Shah Berunai was his older brother who died without an heir. He was succeeded by his elder son Abdul Jalilul Akbar.

Descendants[edit]

Sultan Muhammad Hassan's descendants, through his elder son (*Sultan Jalilul Akbar), have ruled as Sultans of Brunei into the 21st century, and he is the ancestor of the current Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah.

Sultan Muhammad Hassan's middle son Pangiran Muda Tengah (Pangiran Ibrahim Ali Omar Shah @ Raja Tengah) may have been sent to become Sultan of Sarawak then called by Sultan Tengah or Raja Tengah and the son of Sultan Tengah / Raja Tengah named Sulaiman was become Sultan of Sambas.

Al Marhum Sultan Muhammad Hassan also had a son from his Sulu princess wife (*daughter's of Sultan Pangiran Buddiman Ul-Halim). The boy was named Pangiran Shahbandar Maharajalela @ Raja Bongsu-I, who was then sent to Sulu to became the Sultan of Sulu named Sultan Mawalil-Wasit-I (ruled 1610-1650) to succeed his uncle Sultan Betarashah Tengah @ Panguilan Tindig ibni Sultan Pangiran Buddiman Ul-Halim who died without an heir.

On his coming to Sulu from Brunei around 1609, Raja Bongsu-I also was brought along his royal symbol's called Pulau Janggi (in Sulu) and Sepong Janggi ( in Brunei). Its 1/3 of a Coco de mer seed fruit. This royal symbol was a proof of Pangiran Shahbandar Maharajalela @ Raja Bongsu-I was indeed belongs to Brunei Sultanate royal blood. Since then, this royal symbol was mandated to hold by The Maharajah Adinda family (the Sulu Sultanate 2nd heir-apprent) and NOT by the Kiram or the Shakiraullah families (the Sulu Sultanate 1st Heir-apprents).

In 1978, this royal simbol was sent to Brunei Muzeums for "Safe-Keeping" by the Maharajah Adinda true heir, DATU ALIUDDIN Bin Datu Muhammad Sie ibni Maharajah Adinda Sultan Muhammad Aranan/ Adanan Puyo ibni Raja Muda Datu Bantilan @ Datu Badaruddin ibni Sultan Alimuddin-II ibni Sultan Bantilan Muizuddin ibni Sultan Badaruddin-I ibni Sultan Sultan Salahuddin-Karamat ibni Sultan Mawalil-Wasit-I @ Pangiran Shabandar Maharajalela @ Raja Bongsu-I ibni Sultan Muhammad Hassan. (Refer to: Brunei Muzeums record).

By the death of Datu Aliuddin Bin Datu Muhammad Sie in 2007, his elder son's Datu Zainal Ali Bin Datu Aliuddin then succeeding the Maharajah Adinda families legacy.

Wasalam.

Uncertainties[edit]

The earliest historical record of the Sultans of Brunei is not clearly known due to the poor early documentation of Brunei's history. Many elder members of the House of Bolkiah claim that their ancestors were the BaHassan and BaAlawi Saadah from Tarim and Hadhramawt in Yemen. In addition there has been an effort to Islamise the history, with the "official history" not matching up with verifiable foreign sources.[1] The Batu Tarsilah, the genealogical record of the kings of Brunei, was not started until 1807 CE. Therefore, much of the intepretation on history relied on earlier Chinese sources and legends.[2] It seems that the early Sultanate of Brunei was dependent on Chinese support,[2][3][4] and perhaps early Sultans were of Chinese origin.[2] Furthermore the earliest Sultans may have been practising the Hindu or Buddhist religions, with early names indicating this origin.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Brunei". 4dw.net. Retrieved 18 January 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c Elisseeff, Vadime (January 2000). "Chapter 8: A Brunei Sultan of the Early Fourteenth Century — A Study of an Arabic Gravestone". The Silk Roads: Highways of Culture and Commerce. Berghahn Books. pp. 145–157. ISBN 978-1-57181-222-3. Retrieved 26 December 2013. 
  3. ^ "Malay History: What's Missing in Malaysian History Books". Malaysianunplug.blogspot.co.uk. Retrieved 18 January 2015. 
  4. ^ "The golden history of Islam in Brunei". The Brunei Times. Retrieved 18 January 2015.