Muhammad Safdar Awan

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Muhammad Safdar Awan
Member of the National Assembly of Pakistan
In office
1 June 2013 – 31 May 2018
ConstituencyNA-21 (Mansehra-cum-Tor Ghar)
In office
June 2008 – March 2013
ConstituencyNA-52 (Rawalpindi-III)
Personal details
Born (1963-01-19) 19 January 1963 (age 56)
NationalityPakistani
Political partyPakistan Muslim League (N)
Spouse(s)
Maryam Nawaz (m. 1992)
RelativesNawaz Sharif (father-in-law)

Muhammad Safdar Awan (Urdu: محمد صفدر اعوان‎; born 19 January 1963) is a Pakistani politician and retired Pakistan Army officer who had been a member of the National Assembly of Pakistan from June 2008 to May 2018.

Early and personal life[edit]

According to PILDAT, Awan was born on 19 January 1963.[1] According to the News International and Dawn, he was born on 19 January 1964.[2][3]

He joined Pakistan Army after completing his early education.[2]

Awan married Maryam Nawaz in 1992 while he was serving as captain in Pakistan Army[4] and had been the security officer to Nawaz Sharif during the latter's tenure as Prime Minister of Pakistan.[5][6] After retiring from Pakistan Army as captain[7] he joined the civil services, and was posted as Lahore Model Town assistant commissioner.[2][8]

He was deported to Saudi Arabia along with the Sharif family following the 1999 Pakistani coup d'état.[2]

Political career[edit]

Safdar joined politics after returning to Pakistan in 2007 along with the Sharif family.[2]

Awan was elected to the National Assembly as a candidate of Pakistan Muslim League (N) (PML-N) from Constituency NA-52 (Rawalpindi-III) in by-election held in June 2008.[9] He received 54,917 votes[10] and defeated a candidate of Pakistan Muslim League (Q).[11] The seat was vacated by Nisar Ali Khan.[2]

In 2011, Awan was made the chief organiser of the PML-N Youth Wing.[12][2]

In 2012, Awan was suspended from PML-N for verbally abusing leaders of PML-N.[2][13]

Awan was re-elected to the National Assembly as a candidate of PML-N from Constituency NA-21 (Mansehra-cum-Tor Ghar) in Pakistani general election, 2013.[14][15] He received 91,013 votes and a candidate of Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam (F).[16]

In May 2016, Awan was reported to Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) by Imran Khan for concealing Maryam Nawaz assets. Safdar denied that however was summoned by ECP in June 2016.[17][18]

In June 2018, he was allocated PML-N ticket to contest the 2018 general election from Constituency NA-14 (Mansehra-cum-Torghar).[19]

In July 2018, he was sentenced to one year jail term in Avenfield corruption reference filed by the National Accountability Bureau.[20] As a result, he was disqualified from contesting election for 10 years.[21] The next day, he arrived in Rawalpindi and surrendered to authorities.[22]

Political views[edit]

In 2012, Awan publicly supported Islamic fundamentalist Mumtaz Qadri[23][24] who assassinated former Governor of Punjab Salmaan Taseer for speaking against the blasphemy law.[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Detail Information". www.pildat.org. PILDAT. Archived from the original on 25 April 2017. Retrieved 24 April 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Profile: Capt Safdar, from military man to first 'son-in-law'". DAWN.COM. 6 July 2018. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  3. ^ "If elections are held on time…". www.thenews.com.pk. Retrieved 4 December 2017.
  4. ^ "Material, not evidence, submitted: SC". The News. 25 January 2017. Archived from the original on 28 February 2017. Retrieved 27 February 2017.
  5. ^ "Meet the 'first sons-in-law'". www.thenews.com.pk. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  6. ^ Zahra-Malik, Mehreen (27 October 2017). "In Pakistani Fray, Maryam Sharif Is on the Edge of Power, or Prison". The New York Times. Retrieved 28 October 2017.
  7. ^ "Capt Safdar assails PM Office, bureaucrats". DAWN.COM. 19 November 2016. Archived from the original on 28 February 2017. Retrieved 27 February 2017.
  8. ^ "'Termination notice' to Capt Safdar". DAWN.COM. 14 January 2004. Archived from the original on 13 January 2017. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  9. ^ "Capt (R) Safdar likely to be next KP PML-N chief". The News. 12 June 2013. Archived from the original on 12 January 2017. Retrieved 12 January 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  10. ^ "PML-N, PPP make gains". DAWN.COM. 28 June 2008. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  11. ^ Yasin, Aamir (6 May 2013). "Traditional rivals face to face in NA-52". DAWN.COM. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  12. ^ "Sharifs' nepotism angers senior PML-N leaders". pakistantoday. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  13. ^ "Family matters: Nawaz's son-in-law suspended from PML-N - The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. 29 July 2012. Archived from the original on 27 August 2016. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  14. ^ "Trend continues: Family names once again dominate polls - The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. 16 May 2013. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  15. ^ Correspondent, The Newspaper's (13 May 2013). "PML-N's grip on Hazara intact". DAWN.COM. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  16. ^ "2013 election result" (PDF). ECP. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  17. ^ "ECP calls PM's son-in-law on June 1". Samaa TV. 23 May 2016. Archived from the original on 13 January 2017. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  18. ^ "PM's son-in-law summoned for concealing wife's assets". DAWN.COM. 24 May 2016. Archived from the original on 13 January 2017. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  19. ^ Report, Bureau (15 June 2018). "PML-N names candidates for 25 NA seats". DAWN.COM. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  20. ^ "Guilty: Nawaz given 10 years, Maryam 7". DAWN.COM. 6 July 2018. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  21. ^ "AC announces 10 years imprisonment to Nawaz". The Nation. 6 July 2018. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  22. ^ "Capt Safdar arrives in Rawalpindi to 'surrender to authorities'". DAWN.COM. 8 July 2018. Retrieved 8 July 2018.
  23. ^ "Captain Safdar's hate speech". www.thenews.com.pk. Archived from the original on 17 April 2017. Retrieved 16 April 2017.
  24. ^ Nasir, Abbas (15 April 2017). "Outrage fatigue". DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 16 April 2017. Retrieved 16 April 2017.
  25. ^ Asad, Malik (10 March 2015). "Qadri acquitted of terror charge; murder conviction upheld". DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 17 April 2017. Retrieved 16 April 2017.