Mullan, Idaho

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Mullan, Idaho
City
The historic Morning Club building (1921) in 2009
The historic Morning Club building (1921) in 2009
Location of Mullan, Idaho
Location of Mullan, Idaho
Coordinates: 47°28′10″N 115°47′53″W / 47.46944°N 115.79806°W / 47.46944; -115.79806Coordinates: 47°28′10″N 115°47′53″W / 47.46944°N 115.79806°W / 47.46944; -115.79806
Country United States
State Idaho
County Shoshone
Government
 • Mayor Mike Dunnigan
Area[1]
 • Total 0.84 sq mi (2.18 km2)
 • Land 0.84 sq mi (2.18 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 3,278 ft (999 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 692
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 690
 • Density 823.8/sq mi (318.1/km2)
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 83846
Area code(s) 208
FIPS code 16-55630
GNIS feature ID 0387396

Mullan is a city in Shoshone County in the northern part of the U.S. state of Idaho. The population was 692 at the 2010 census, down from 840 in 2000. The city is in the east end of the Silver Valley mining district; located in a sheltered canyon of the Coeur d'Alene Mountains at an elevation of 3,278 feet (1,000 m) above sea level. The entrance to the Lucky Friday mine is several hundred yards east of the city center;[4] the active mine (silver, lead, & zinc) descends more than 6,000 feet (1.83 km) below the surface.

Interstate 90 runs by the south side of the city, and the Montana border at Lookout Pass is 4 miles (6 km) east at 4,700 feet (1,430 m) above sea level.

History[edit]

Mullan came into existence in 1884 with the discovery of gold at the Gold Hunter Mine, which turned out to be a lead and silver producer. That same year George Good made a lead-silver strike with the Morning Mine and Mullan came into existence between the two mines. The site was filed in August 1888, after the village had twenty log and fifteen frame houses, a sawmill, and a population of 150. The Northern Pacific Railway came to it in 1889 and the city was incorporated in 1904.[5]

During the Coeur d'Alene, Idaho labor confrontation of 1899, 200 miners from Mullan joined the Dynamite Express. In the aftermath of the labor war, many of Mullan's leaders and Populist elected officials including the sheriff were arrested and sent to the Wallace bull pens[6]

The city was named for West Point graduate John Mullan,[7] who was in charge of selecting a wagon route (commonly called the Mullan Road) between Fort Benton (Montana) and Fort Walla Walla (Washington). Lieutenant Mullan, a topographical engineer, began gathering information in 1854. Delayed by the Indian War of 1858, construction began in 1859 from Fort Walla Walla. From today's Mullan townsite, the Mullan Road continued 6–7 miles southeast up Willow Creek to cross the Idaho-Montana border at today's St. Regis Pass, then named by Mullan, Sohan Pass, for artist Gustavus Sohon whose explorations found the 4900-foot pass.[8] After the strenuous project was completed in 1860, floods wiped out substantial stretches of the road, and the road was re-routed in 1861. Floods again damaged the road, and ultimately, no provision for maintenance was provided.[9]

Mullan's population has declined in recent decades, from a peak of 2,291 in 1940.[10]

Mullan Today[edit]

Although Mullan is significantly smaller than it was in the heyday of the Morning and Lucky Friday mines, there remains a strong community. The Mullan School District operates the John Mullan Elementary School (K-6) and the Mullan Junior/Senior High School (7–12), opened 89 years ago in 1927.[11]

Mullan has its own fire department and owns and maintains an Olympic-size swimming pool (50 m (55 yd)) for community use. The city is accessed from Interstate 90 at exits 67, 68, and 69.

The historic Morning Club building was built 95 years ago in 1921 by the Morning Mine as a gift to the town. The Club is now owned by the city and is home to a bowling alley and the library. It also has a multipurpose room, complete with stage.

Geography[edit]

Mullan is located at 47°28′08″N 115°47′53″W / 47.469°N 115.798°W / 47.469; -115.798,[12] at an elevation of 3,278 feet (999 m) above sea level.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.84 square miles (2.18 km2), all of it land.[1]

Climate[edit]

According to the Köppen climate classification system, Mullan has an oceanic climate (Köppen Cfb). Its cold winters nearly qualify it for having a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb).

Climate data for Mullan (1975-2015)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 56
(13)
65
(18)
74
(23)
87
(31)
93
(34)
93
(34)
97
(36)
96
(36)
95
(35)
87
(31)
65
(18)
52
(11)
97
(36)
Average high °F (°C) 34.5
(1.4)
39.8
(4.3)
47.4
(8.6)
56.4
(13.6)
63.9
(17.7)
71.5
(21.9)
78.6
(25.9)
78.6
(25.9)
69.7
(20.9)
57.6
(14.2)
39.9
(4.4)
32.9
(0.5)
55.9
(13.3)
Average low °F (°C) 21.4
(−5.9)
23.5
(−4.7)
27
(−3)
32.6
(0.3)
37.9
(3.3)
44.2
(6.8)
47.1
(8.4)
47.2
(8.4)
40.4
(4.7)
33.1
(0.6)
26.8
(−2.9)
21.3
(−5.9)
33.5
(0.8)
Record low °F (°C) −20
(−29)
−18
(−28)
−3
(−19)
17
(−8)
23
(−5)
30
(−1)
34
(1)
31
(−1)
20
(−7)
9
(−13)
−10
(−23)
−21
(−29)
−21
(−29)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.41
(86.6)
3.54
(89.9)
3.22
(81.8)
2.72
(69.1)
2.91
(73.9)
2.73
(69.3)
1.54
(39.1)
1.59
(40.4)
1.79
(45.5)
2.82
(71.6)
4.72
(119.9)
4.32
(109.7)
35.31
(896.9)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 25.6
(65)
21.8
(55.4)
13.7
(34.8)
4.2
(10.7)
0.6
(1.5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
2
(5)
16.4
(41.7)
27.3
(69.3)
111.7
(283.7)
Average precipitation days 16 15 16 14 15 12 8 8 8 11 18 17 158
Source: WRCC[13]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 1,667
1920 1,320 −20.8%
1930 1,891 43.3%
1940 2,291 21.2%
1950 2,036 −11.1%
1960 1,477 −27.5%
1970 1,279 −13.4%
1980 1,269 −0.8%
1990 821 −35.3%
2000 840 2.3%
2010 692 −17.6%
Est. 2014 673 [14] −2.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 692 people, 326 households, and 193 families residing in the city. The population density was 823.8 inhabitants per square mile (318.1/km2). There were 434 housing units at an average density of 516.7 per square mile (199.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.8% White, 1.0% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.7% from other races, and 2.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.2% of the population.

There were 326 households of which 20.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.3% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.8% were non-families. 36.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.12 and the average family size was 2.72.

The median age in the city was 48.3 years. 17.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20.9% were from 25 to 44; 33.8% were from 45 to 64; and 20.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 51.9% male and 48.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 840 people, 367 households, and 227 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,011.6 people per square mile (390.8/km²). There were 456 housing units at an average density of 549.1 per square mile (212.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.31% White, 1.43% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 1.19% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.86% of the population.

There were 367 households out of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.2% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.9% were non-families. 32.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.9% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 27.5% from 45 to 64, and 16.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 101.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,417, and the median income for a family was $36,917. Males had a median income of $31,250 versus $20,833 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,943. About 7.8% of families and 12.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.2% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-03. 
  4. ^ MSR Maps - USGS topo map - Mullan, Idaho - accessed 2011-12-11
  5. ^ *Fisher, Vardis; Federal Writers' Project (1938). Idaho Encyclopedia. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton Printers, Ltd. p. 398. OCLC 962624. 
  6. ^ History of Selected Mines in the Pine Creek Area, Shoshone County, Idaho by Victoria E Mitchell, Idaho Geological Survey
  7. ^ "Folklore refuted by early settler". Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington). October 18, 1965. p. 5. 
  8. ^ John Mullan: The Tumultuous Life Of A Western Road Builder, Keith C. Petersen, Washington State University Press, 2014, pages 114, 292n55
  9. ^ *Jackson, W. Turrentine (1938). Wagon Roads West. Berkeley, California: University of California Press. pp. 257–278. ISBN 0-8032-9402-6. 
  10. ^ Historical Populations by City, Idaho Department of Commerce. Accessed 2009-05-30.
  11. ^ "New $56,000 Mullan, Idaho, high school". Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington). October 9, 1927. p. 15. 
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  13. ^ "MULLAN, ID (106230)". Western Regional Climate Center. Retrieved November 26, 2015. 
  14. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  15. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]