Mundy Township, Michigan

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Charter Township of Mundy

Mundy Township
Motto(s): 
Where Town and Country Shake Hands
Charter Township of Mundy is located in Michigan
Charter Township of Mundy
Charter Township of Mundy
Location within the state of Michigan
Coordinates: 42°54′52″N 83°45′02″W / 42.91444°N 83.75056°W / 42.91444; -83.75056Coordinates: 42°54′52″N 83°45′02″W / 42.91444°N 83.75056°W / 42.91444; -83.75056
Public Land Survey SystemT5N R5E
CountryUnited States
StateMichigan
CountyGenesee
Settled1833
Organized1837[1]
Named forEdward Mundy
SeatMundy Avenue, Rankin
Government
 • TypeSupervisor-board
 • SupervisorDavid Guigear
 • ClerkTonya Ketzler
 • TreasurerJoe Oskey
 • Trustees
Area
 • Total36.1 sq mi (93.4 km2)
 • Land36.0 sq mi (93.2 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)
Elevation
830 ft (253 m)
Population
 • Total15,082
 • Density338.8/sq mi (130.8/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
48473 (Swartz Creek),
48507 (Flint),
48439 (Grand Blanc)
Area code(s)810
FIPS code26-56160[2]
GNIS feature ID1626779[3]
CharterCharter Township Act
Websitewww.mundytwp-mi.gov

The Charter Township of Mundy is a charter township of Genesee County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 15,082 at the 2010 census.

The Survey township area that Mundy mostly covers is range 5 North and 5 East.[4]

Communities[edit]

The township has two unincorporated communities within its borders:

History[edit]

In 1833, the first land purchases in Mundy survey township area were made on sections 11-14, with all 40 acres (160,000 m2) in the section purchased by 1837. The first settlement was in section 13 by Jason L. Austin, Daniel Williams and Eli Gilbert. Grand Blanc Township was formed on March 9, 1833 and included multiple township areas including the future Mundy Township.[7]

The Township was named after Edward Mundy, lieutenant governor, when organized on March 11, 1837[1] included the survey township that would become Gaines Township.[7] The first meeting of the township was held on April 3, 1837 at the Josiah Alger's house with 18 voters with three of them fr. There were 38 total voters at the November 1840 general election.[1] On March 9, 1842, Gaines was split off from Mundy.[7]

In southern part of the township north of Mount Pleasant, a settlement on the north side of Long Lake (now Lake Fenton), Morgan Baldwin and George Judson settled the location around Baldwin Road soon called Podunk.[8]

A post office opened in the township on May 1, 1848 and was moved to Mt. Pleasant as Long Lake Post Office on March 6, 1851. The office returned to Mundy on March 24, 1852.[9] On March 9, 1855, the Elgin Post Office was opened with postmaster William Moore[10] and was located at Mason Tavern along the Fenton plank road on the Southeast corner of section 13.[11] On April 12, 1871, the Elgin post office was closed.[10] The Mundy Post Office was closed on December 31, 1900.[9]

In January and February 2014, Swartz Creek City and Gaines Township was contact by Mundy Township Supervisor David L. Guigear in attempt to meet over regionalization of building department, code enforcement, janitorial and especial police.[12] On April 2, 2014, Gaines Township turned down a police department merger with Mundy Township.[13]

On January 9, 2016, the Swartz Creek City Council voted to disband its police department by merging the department with Mundy Township's into the Metro Police Authority of Genesee County effective February 1, 2016.[14]

Years Supervisor Town Clerk Collector Assessors Justices of the Peace Constables Highway Commissioners School Inspectors
1837 John Alger Morgan Baldwin George Judson Jonathan G. Firman, Morgan Baldwin, Benjamin Simmons and Seth Kitchen Benjamin Simmons (1 yr.), Josiah Alger (2 yr.), Morgan Baldwin (3 yr.), Henry M. Thompson (4 yr.) George Judson, Volney Stiles J. G. Firman, George Judson and Jeshurum Leach Jonathan Firman, Ira Dunning and Dudley Brainard

[15]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 36.1 square miles (93 km2), of which 36.0 square miles (93 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.28%) is water. A portion of the township survey area, between Jennings and Torrey Road, was annexed by the City of Flint for Bishop International Airport.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19605,004
19708,02960.5%
198010,78634.3%
199011,5116.7%
200012,1915.9%
201015,08223.7%
Source: Census Bureau. Census 1960- 2000, 2010.

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 12,191 people, 4,876 households, and 3,583 families residing in the township. The population density was 338.8 per square mile (130.8/km²). There were 5,047 housing units at an average density of 140.3 per square mile (54.2/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.04% White, 1.41% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.82% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.44% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.85% of the population.

There were 4,876 households out of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.0% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.5% were non-families. 22.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the township the population was spread out with 22.7% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 29.0% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.6 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $53,948, and the median income for a family was $62,125. Males had a median income of $51,442 versus $30,067 for females. The per capita income for the township was $23,581. About 1.9% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 0.9% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

District Number Officeholder
U.S. Representative 5th Dan Kildee
State Senate 14 Dave Robertson[16]
State Representative 50th Tim Sneller[17]
County Commissioner 6th Drew Shapiro
8th Ted Hemry
School District Carman-Ainsworth Multiple: see articles
Swartz Creek
Lake Fenton
Grand Blanc
Community College C.S. Mott Multiple: see article
Polling Locations

As do most townships in Michigan, Mundy Township in Genesee County has a Supervisor-Board form of government. In this form of government, three members of the Board of Trustees are executives: Supervisor (being the township's chief executive), Clerk and Treasurer. There are four additional trustees elected to the Board.

Roads are administrated by the Genesee County Road Commission while schools are primarily handled by Carman-Ainsworth and the Swartz Creek School Districts. Police services, starting February 1, 2017, are taken care of by the Metro Police Authority of Genesee County, of which Mundy is a member.[14] Mundy Township is within the Genesee District Library system and the local library including the Perkins Library branch in Swartz Creek.[18] The Genesee District Library levies .998 mills.[19]

Metro Police Authority[edit]

Metro Police Authority of Genesee County
Common nameMetro Police
Agency overview
FormedDecember 9, 2015
Preceding agencies
  • Swartz Creek Police Department
  • Mundy Township Police Department
Legal personalityGovernmental: Government-owned corporation
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdictionMichigan, US
Population17,949
Legal jurisdictionMichigan
Governing bodyPolice Authority Board
Constituting instrument
  • Interlocal Agreement Establishing the Metro Police Authority of Genesee County
General nature
HeadquartersGrand Blanc Road, Rankin, Mundy Township, Michigan

Police officers29
Board members responsible
  • Board chair, Curt Porath
  • Board vice chair, Kay Doerr
Agency executive
  • Matthew Bade, Chief of Police
Parent agencySwartz Creek
Mundy Township
Facilities
Posts2
K9s2
Website
www.metropolicegc.org

Metro Police Authority of Genesee County is county regional police agency formed in 2015 and operational in 2016 to serve multiple local governmental areas in Genesee County.

In January and February 2014, neighboring Swartz Creek City and Gaines Township was contact by Mundy Township Supervisor David L. Guigear in attempt to meet over regionalization of building department, code enforcement, janitorial and especial police.[12] On April 2, 2014, Gaines Township turned down a police department merger with Mundy Township.[13] Swartz Creek Chief Rick Clolinger and Mundy Chief Dan Atkinson visited a consolidated police department in Pennsylvania. There after Chief Clolinger announced his intent to retire in mid-August 2014 opening up discussion on merging police departments.[20] After approving a share services agreement with Mundy in October 2014, the city had Mundy's police chief serve as chief on Clolinger's retirement date of November 1, 2014. Clolinger started part-time as deputy chief for Mundy on that date.[21] Mundy's and Swartz Creek's officers were sworn into the other department on January 14, 2015 following a period of working in each other's jurisdiction.[22]

Mundy Township Board approved the interlocal agreement on October 12, 2015 with one no vote. Original Mundy board authority members appointed were Trustee Kay Doerr, Township Clerk Tonya Ketzler and Treasurer Joe Oskey. Swartz Creek passed the agreement on October 26 with a vote of 5 to 2. A final merger vote would take place in six months. Original Mundy board authority members appointed were Mayor David Krueger and Councilman Dennis Pinkston and Curt Porath.[23]

On December 9, 2015, the Regional Police Authority Board met for the first time with officers selected were City Councilman Curt Porath as chair and Township Trustee Kay Doerr as vice chair. A tour of a potential new HQ building for the authority was toured.[24]

On January 9, 2016, the Swartz Creek City Council voted 6 to 1 to disband its police department by merging the department with Mundy Township's into the Metro Police Authority of Genesee County effective February 1, 2016 following Mundy's approval.[14] In September 2017, Gaines Township and Authority officers were cross sworn in each other jurisdictions as a form of mutual aid while not necessarily planning to merge with the Authority.[25]

In May 2018, Interim Chief Lieutenant Matthew Bade was selected as permanent chief over former Swartz Creek Police Chief/Mundy Township Deputy Chief Rick Clolinger following the February retirement of Police Chief Dan Atkinson.[26] On October 1, 2019, the city turned over the operation of the city’s parking violations bureau to the Metro Police Authority.[27] At the late November 2018 meeting, the authority board selected Simen, Figura & Parker to prosecute all of the local ordinance violations for the authority.[28]

Authority Board[edit]

The authority board consists of seven members, three from each municipality plus one neutral member selected by the municipal members. The seventh member would vote in case of ties. Budget approvals need five votes. Current board members are Kay Doerr, Tonya Ketzler, Joe Oskey, David Krueger, Dennis Pinkston and Curt Porath[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Wood, Edwin O. (1916). History of Genesee County, Michigan, Her People, Industries and Institutions. Michigan Historical Commission.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Mundy Township, Michigan
  4. ^ a b "Mundy Township" (Map). Genesee County 1873. F. W. Beers. 1873. p. 91. Retrieved April 18, 2014.
  5. ^ The History of Genesee County, MI. Chapter XXVI: The Villages of Genesee County, Part II
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Rankin, Michigan
  7. ^ a b c Wood, Edwin O. (1916). "Chapter V: Pioneer Days in the Townships". History of Genesee County, Michigan, Her People, Industries and Institutions. Michigan Historical Commission.
  8. ^ "History of the Lake Fenton schools". Tri-County Times. August 14, 2004. Retrieved January 10, 2017.
  9. ^ a b U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Mundy Post Office (historical) Citation: Ellis, David M. Michigan Postal History, The Post Offices 1805-1986. 12-Dec-1993.
  10. ^ a b Walter Romig, Michigan Place Names, p. 178
  11. ^ Ellis, Franklin (1879). History of Genesee County, Michigan: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers. Everts & Abbott. p. 290. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  12. ^ a b "Joining forces?". The Swartz Creek View. February 13, 2014. Retrieved December 2, 2016.
  13. ^ a b Dresden, Eric (April 4, 2014). "Gaines Township rejects plan to share police services with Mundy Township". Flint Journal. MLive Media Group. Retrieved January 10, 2017.
  14. ^ a b c Pierret, Ann (January 9, 2017). "UPDATE: Swartz Creek council gives final OK to police merger with Mundy Twp". ABC12.com. WJRT. Retrieved January 10, 2017.
  15. ^ Wood, Edwin O. (1916). History of Genesee County, Michigan, Her People, Industries and Institutions. Michigan Historical Commission.
  16. ^ Gibbons, Lauren (February 16, 2017). "Secretary of State Ruth Johnson contemplating run for state Senate". MLive.com. Retrieved September 20, 2017.
  17. ^ "Michigan 50th District State House Results: Tim Sneller Wins". The New York Times. August 1, 2017. Retrieved September 20, 2017.
  18. ^ Habermehl, Kayla (September 29, 2011). "Swartz Creek alone in covering building, utility costs for Perkins Library this year". Flint Journal. Mlive Media Group. Retrieved September 7, 2016.
  19. ^ Thorne, Blake (May 4, 2011). "Voters support new tax for Genesee District Library". Flint Journal. Mlive Media Group. Retrieved September 7, 2016.
  20. ^ Rocha, Lania (August 21, 2014). "Chief to retire". The Swartz Creek View. JAMA Media. p. 1. Retrieved January 11, 2017.
  21. ^ Rocha, Lania (October 16, 2014). "Jumping the gun?". The Swartz Creek View. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  22. ^ "Duty roster". The Swartz Creek View. JAMS Media/View Newspaper Group. January 22, 2015. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  23. ^ a b Rocha, Lania (October 29, 2015). "Authority board to tackle details of police merger". The Swartz Creek View. JAMS Media. Retrieved September 26, 2017.
  24. ^ Rocha, Lania (December 17, 2015). "Police authority board addresses details of merger". The Swartz Creek View. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  25. ^ Rocha, Lania (September 14, 2017). "Police officers sworn-in in Gaines Twp". The Swartz Creek View. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  26. ^ Rocha, Lania (May 17, 2018). "Bade selected as new chief for Metro Police Authority". Swartz Creek View. View Newspaper Group. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  27. ^ Rocha, Lania (September 6, 2018). "City, Metro to step up parking code enforcement". Swartz Creek View. View Newspaper Group. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  28. ^ December 06, ohtadmin (December 6, 2018). "In brief: MPA board Oks attorney contract". Swartz Creek View. View Newspaper Group. Retrieved 23 January 2019. Text " on " ignored (help)

External links[edit]