Munsey Park, New York

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Munsey Park, New York
Incorporated Village of Munsey Park
Park Avenue in Munsey Park, looking East.
Park Avenue in Munsey Park, looking East.
Nickname(s): 
"Park"; "The Park"
Location in Nassau County and the state of New York.
Location in Nassau County and the state of New York.
Munsey Park, New York is located in New York
Munsey Park, New York
Munsey Park, New York
Location within the state of New York
Coordinates: 40°47′59″N 73°40′53″W / 40.79972°N 73.68139°W / 40.79972; -73.68139Coordinates: 40°47′59″N 73°40′53″W / 40.79972°N 73.68139°W / 40.79972; -73.68139
Country United States
State New York
County Nassau County, New York
TownNorth Hempstead
Incorporated1930
Named forFrank Munsey
Government
 • MayorLawrence Ceriello
 • Deputy MayorAnthony D'Angelo
Area
 • Total0.52 sq mi (1.34 km2)
 • Land0.52 sq mi (1.34 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
157 ft (48 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total2,693
 • Estimate 
(2019)[2]
2,710
 • Density5,251.94/sq mi (2,027.31/km2)
Demonym(s)Munsey Parker
Manhassetonian
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP Code
11030
Area code(s)516
FIPS code36-49231
GNIS feature ID0958164
Websitewww.munseypark.org

Munsey Park is a village in Nassau County, on the North Shore of Long Island, in New York, United States. It is considered part of the Greater Manhasset area, which is anchored by Manhasset. The population was 2,693 at the 2010 census.

The Incorporated Village of Munsey Park is in the Town of North Hempstead, and has been recognized as a Tree City USA since 1983.

History[edit]

The Munsey Park Elementary School on January 11, 2021.

The village was first developed in the 1920s on North Shore land previously owned by wealthy publisher Frank Munsey as a commuter town and "model, restricted community" taking advantage of the Manhasset LIRR station.[3][4][5][6][7] The land was bequeathed by Munsey to The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1925, which developed the planned community under the leadership of museum president Robert W. DeForest.[3][4][5][8] It was developed featuring Colonial-style houses and streets named for American artists.[3][4][5][9][10] Much of the original landscaping was designed by the Olmsted Brothers.[11][12]

In 1928, Munsey Park's first model home opened.[4][13][14]

In 1930, residents voted to incorporate their community as a village, with its own municipal government and zoning ability.[4] Residents incorporated after learning about the creation of a sewer district serving Greater Manhasset; the proposal led to a significant amount of concern amongst many of the locals, who were opposed to sewering the area.[4][15]

Since the Village of Munsey Park was located a considerable distance away from the former Plandome Road School, the Manhasset Union Free School District built the Munsey Park Elementary School within village boundaries during the 1930s.[4]

On December 8, 1974, Munsey Park Village Hall opened.[4] It is located at 1777 Northern Boulevard and was built to conform to the style of residential homes in the village.[4]

Munsey Park was first designated as a Tree City USA by the National Arbor Day Foundation in 1983, and has been recognized as such ever since.[3]

In 2008, the Village of Munsey Park was ranked as the 13th (tied) Wealthiest Town in America by BusinessWeek.[16]

The name of the development was originally to be Munsey Meadows – but this name was changed to Munsey Park; it is named in honor of Frank Munsey.[4][5][7]

Geography[edit]

U.S. Census map of Munsey Park.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2), all of it land.[17]

Munsey Park is split between two drainage areas: Leeds Pond and Whitney Pond.[18][19][20][21] These two drainage areas are sub-watersheds of the larger Manhasset Bay Watershed, which in turn is part of the larger Long Island Sound/Atlantic Ocean Watershed, which covers all of Nassau and Suffolk Counties.[20][21][22]

Munsey Park uses the Manhasset 11030 postal code.[23]

Economy[edit]

Munsey Park is a bedroom community of the City of New York, which is how the community was originally developed to be.[4][5][6] As such, a significant number of Munsey Park residents commute to/from New York for work.[4][5][6]

The village itself is predominantly residential in character, with the heavy majority of lots within the village being zoned for single-family homes.[24] The only businesses within the Munsey Park are at two small shopping centers along the north side of Northern Boulevard.[24]

When originally planned, the intersection of Manhasset Woods Road and Park Avenue was to contain businesses, as well as near Locust Place (now Munsey Place); these plans were eventually amended in favor of single-family homes.[4]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930411
19401,456254.3%
19502,04840.7%
19602,84739.0%
19702,9804.7%
19802,806−5.8%
19902,692−4.1%
20002,632−2.2%
20102,6932.3%
2019 (est.)2,710[2]0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[25]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census of 2010, there were 2,693 people residing in the village.[26][27] The racial makeup of the village was 91.20% White, 0.41% African American, 6.46% Asian, 0.37% from other races, and 1.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.23% of the population.

Census 2000[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 2,632 people, 817 households, and 731 families residing in the village.[26] The population density was 5,073.4 people per square mile (1,954.3/km2). There were 833 housing units at an average density of 1,605.7 per square mile (618.5/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 93.35% White, 0.34% African American, 5.66% Asian, 0.08% from other races, and 0.57% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.63% of the population.

There were 817 households, out of which 48.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 82.6% were married couples living together, 5.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 10.5% were non-families. 9.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.22 and the average family size was 3.43.

In the village, the population was spread out, with 30.8% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 23.6% from 25 to 44, 28.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.3 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $149,100, and the median income for a family was $159,147. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $46,250 for females. The per capita income for the village was $66,772. About 1.6% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.5% of those under age 18 and 1.2% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

Village government[edit]

Munsey Park Village Hall on July 28, 2021.

As of August 2021, the Mayor of Munsey Park is Lawrence Ceriello, the Deputy Mayor is Anthony D'Angelo, and the Village Trustees are Antonio D'Angelo, Regina Im, Gregory Licalzi, Jr., and Joseph Williams.[23][28]

Representation in higher government[edit]

Town representation[edit]

Munsey Park is located in the Town of North Hempstead's 6th district, which as of August 2021 is represented on the Town Board by Mariann Dalimonte (D – Port Washington).[29]

Nassau County representation[edit]

Munsey Park is located in Nassau County's 9th Legislative district, which as of August 2021 is represented in the Nassau County Legislature by Richard Nicoello (RNew Hyde Park).[24][30]

New York State representation[edit]

New York State Assembly[edit]

Munsey Park is located within the New York State Assembly's 16th Assembly district, which as of August 2021 is represented by Gina Sillitti (D–Manorhaven).[24][31]

New York State Senate[edit]

Munsey Park is located in the New York State Senate's 7th State Senate district, which as of August 2021 is represented in the New York State Senate by Anna Kaplan (D–North Hills).[24][32]

Federal representation[edit]

United States Congress[edit]

Munsey Park is located in New York's 3rd congressional district, which as of August 2021 is represented in the United States Congress by Tom Suozzi (D–Glen Cove).[24][33]

United States Senate[edit]

Like the rest of New York, Munsey Park is represented in the United States Senate by Charles Schumer (D) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D).[34]

Politics[edit]

In the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the majority of Munsey Park voters voted for Donald Trump (R).[35]

Education[edit]

School district[edit]

The Village of Munsey Park is located entirely within the boundaries of the Manhasset Union Free School District.[4][24][36][37] As such, all children who reside within Munsey Park and attend public schools go to Manhasset's schools.[4][24][36][37]

As aforementioned, the Munsey Park Elementary School is located within the village.[4]

Library district[edit]

Munsey Park is located within the boundaries of the Manhasset Library District.[24]

Parks & recreation[edit]

Waldmann Memorial Park on June 15, 2021.

Munsey Park owns and operates 2 municipal parks:[4]

  • Copley Pond Park
  • Waldmann Memorial Park

In addition to these two municipal parks, Munsey Park is located within the boundaries of the Manhasset Park District, a special park district serving much of Greater Manhasset.[24]

Furthermore, the short-lived, unsuccessful 18-hole Munsey Park Golf Club was formerly located at the eastern end of the village between 1932 and 1937, and the Munsey Park Elementary School also features a playground and recreational fields.[4]

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Road[edit]

Munsey Park is served by 2 state roads, which also form portions of the village's boundaries.[24] Northern Boulevard (New York State Route 25A) forms the southern border of the village, while Port Washington Boulevard (New York State Route 101) forms its eastern border.[24]

An entrance pier to the village at the Manhasset Woods Road–Northern Boulevard (NY 25A) intersection on September 6, 2021.

Other major streets within the village include Park Avenue, Park Avenue North, and Manhasset Woods Road.[24]

Many streets, such as Sargent Place and Eakins Road, use a street naming convention based on famous artists.[3][4][5][6][24]

Rail[edit]

No rail service passes through Munsey Park.[24] The nearest Long Island Rail Road station to the village is Manhasset on the Port Washington Branch.[24]

Bus[edit]

Munsey Park is served by the n20H, n21, and n23 bus routes, which are operated by Nassau Inter-County Express (NICE).[38] These three bus routes travel through the area via Northern Boulevard and Port Washington Boulevard.[38]

Utilities[edit]

Natural gas[edit]

National Grid USA provides natural gas to homes and businesses that are hooked up to natural gas lines in Munsey Park.[39][40]

Power[edit]

PSEG Long Island provides power to all homes and businesses within Munsey Park.[39][41][42]

Sewage[edit]

Munsey Park is unsewered.[15][24][43] As such, the entirety of the village relies on cesspools and septic systems, as opposed to being connected to sanitary sewers.[43]

Water[edit]

The Munsey Park Water Tower on September 6, 2021.

Munsey Park is located within the boundaries of the Manhasset–Lakeville Water District, which provides the entirety of Munsey Park with water.[24]

The Manhasset–Lakeville Water District also owns and operates a water tower within the village, known as the Munsey Park Water Tower.[44][45]

Emergency services[edit]

Law Enforcement[edit]

The Village of Munsey Park is served by the 6th Precinct of the Nassau County Police Department, with RMP 609 assigned as the Munsey Park car.[23][24]

Policing is funded through village and county taxes.[23]

Fire district[edit]

Munsey Park is located entirely within the boundaries of (and is thus served by) the Manhasset–Lakeville Fire Department.[24][46]

Notable people[edit]

Official Newspaper[edit]

The Manhasset Press is the newspaper of record for the Village of Munsey Park.[51] It is owned by Anton Media Group.[52][53]

In popular culture[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 27, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e "About the Village". Munsey Park. Retrieved 2021-06-14.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "Village History". Munsey Park. Retrieved 2021-06-14.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Mackay, Robert B. (2015). Gardens of Eden: Long Island's Early Twentieth-Century Planned Communities. W. W. Norton & Company. ISBN 978-0393733211.
  6. ^ a b c d Winsche, Richard (October 1, 1999). The History of Nassau County Community Place-Names. Interlaken, New York: Empire State Books. ISBN 978-1557871541.
  7. ^ a b Murray, Anthony (2019-05-06). "Striking Gold: A look at the expansive history of Munsey Park". Manhasset Press. Retrieved 2021-08-22.
  8. ^ "Welcome to 20/20 Perfect Vision Land Records I2". i2f.uslandrecords.com. Retrieved 2020-08-10.
  9. ^ Mackay, Robert B. (2015). Gardens of Eden: Long Island's Early Twentieth-Century Planned Communities. W. W. Norton & Company. ISBN 978-0393733211.
  10. ^ Cooper, Lee E. (1937-08-29). "Streets Named for American Artists In Growing Munsey Park District; New Section Opened on Former Muansey Estate Given to Metropolitan Museum of Art--Hewlett Harbor Builders Plan Homes on Part of Former Auerbach Estate 350 Dwellings Completed Hewlett Harbor Changing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-06-15.
  11. ^ Olmsted Archives, Frederick Law Olmsted NHS, NPS (2014-09-03), photo album 07434-01-ph001, retrieved 2021-08-22CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  12. ^ Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics, and International Communications, United States Congress (1927). Drugs, Law Enforcement, and Foreign Policy: The Cartel, Haiti, and Central America. U.S. Government Printing Office. pp. 366–367.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  13. ^ "Finding aid for the J. Kenneth Loughry Records, 1929, 1943-1971 (bulk 1945-1969)] in The Metropolitan Museum of Art Archives" (PDF).
  14. ^ Rather, John (1999-08-01). "If You're Thinking of Living In /Munsey Park, N.Y.; High Standards, Eye to Tradition". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-08-22.
  15. ^ a b October 24, Lisa Doll Bruno STAFF WRITER; Pm, 2002 8:00. "LIVING IN MUNSEY PARK / A Village Designed for Distinction". Newsday. Retrieved 2021-09-05.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  16. ^ "The Wealthiest Towns in America". Businessweek.com.
  17. ^ "Munsey Park village, New York Profile". data.census.gov. Retrieved 2021-07-28.
  18. ^ "LEEDS POND AQUATIC SAND REMOVAL" (PDF). Town of North Hempstead, New York. August 2014. Retrieved 2020-06-16.
  19. ^ "TOWN OF NORTH HEMPSTEAD WHITNEY/MANHASSET VALLEY POND MANHASSET, NY HURRICANE SANDY AQUATIC SAND REMOVAL" (PDF). Town of North Hempstead, New York. April 2014. Retrieved 2021-06-16.
  20. ^ a b New York Rapid Watershed Assessment Profile – Northern Long Island Watershed. Syracuse, New York: United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service. 2011.
  21. ^ a b "Manhasset Bay Protection Committee - Watershed Information". manhassetbayprotectioncommittee.org. Retrieved 2021-07-28.
  22. ^ "Atlantic Ocean/Long Island Sound Watershed - NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation". www.dec.ny.gov. Retrieved 2021-07-28. The Atlantic Ocean/Long Island Sound Watershed drains most of the New York City Metropolitan Area and all of Long Island.
  23. ^ a b c d "Munsey Park". Munsey Park. Retrieved 2020-08-10.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t "Long Island Index: Interactive Map". Long Island Index Maps. Long Island Index.
  25. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  26. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  27. ^ "Roslyn Estates, NY Population - Census 2010 and 2000 Interactive Map, Demographics, Statistics, Quick Facts - CensusViewer". censusviewer.com. Retrieved 2021-07-20.
  28. ^ "Trustee Assignments". Munsey Park. Retrieved 2021-08-12.
  29. ^ "Town of North Hempstead - Councilwoman Mariann Dalimonte". northhempsteadny.gov. Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  30. ^ "District 9 - Richard J. Nicolello | Nassau County, NY - Official Website". www.nassaucountyny.gov. Retrieved 2021-07-22.
  31. ^ "Gina L. Sillitti - Assembly District 16 |Assembly Member Directory | New York State Assembly". nyassembly.gov. Retrieved 2021-07-22.
  32. ^ "NY Senate District 7". NY State Senate. Retrieved 2021-07-22.
  33. ^ "Suozzi Declares Victory In NY 3rd Congressional District Race". Huntington, NY Patch. 2020-11-17. Retrieved 2021-07-22.
  34. ^ "U.S. Senate: Contacting U.S. Senators". www.senate.gov. Retrieved 2021-07-22.
  35. ^ Welch, Will (2017-11-08). "How Long Island Voted". Newsday. Retrieved 2021-06-23.
  36. ^ a b "Manhasset Public Schools".
  37. ^ a b "Composite School District Boundaries Shapefiles". NCES. Retrieved 2020-10-23.
  38. ^ a b "Nassau Inter-County Express - Maps and Schedules". nicebus.com. Retrieved 2020-08-10.
  39. ^ a b "Long Island Utility Information - LIPA, Nat Grid, & Local Water Authorities". LongIsland.com. Retrieved 2020-10-24.
  40. ^ "Natural Gas & Electricity | National Grid". www.nationalgridus.com. Retrieved 2021-07-21.
  41. ^ "PSEG Long Island: Reporting an outage". Munsey Park. Retrieved 2021-09-05.
  42. ^ "Home Page - PSEG Long Island". www.psegliny.com. Retrieved 2021-07-21.
  43. ^ a b "Sewerage Map – Nassau County". County of Nassau, New York. Retrieved 2021-08-05.
  44. ^ Johnson, Elizabeth (2017-03-24). "The Old Water Tower Is Coming Down". Manhasset Press. Retrieved 2021-09-05.
  45. ^ Zahn, Max (2017-03-29). "Old Munsey Park water tower to be removed by mid-April - Manhasset Times". The Island Now. Retrieved 2021-09-05.
  46. ^ Kirk Candan. "Manhasset-Lakeville Fire Department - Public Blog".
  47. ^ "William Haugaard from Munsey Park in 1940 Census District 30-235". www.archives.com. Retrieved 2021-09-06.
  48. ^ a b Todd, Nancy L. (2006-09-14). New York's Historic Armories: An Illustrated History. SUNY Press. ISBN 978-0-7914-8099-1.
  49. ^ a b "Manhasset Press. (Manhasset, N.Y.) 1934-current, February 25, 1937, Image 1". The Manhasset Press. February 25, 1937. Retrieved 2021-09-06.
  50. ^ a b "Nassau GOP picks Phillips as county comptroller candidate". Newsday. Retrieved 2021-09-06.
  51. ^ "Manhasset Press - Serving Manhasset, Munsey Park, Plandome Manor & Flower Hill, Long Island". Archived from the original on 2006-12-05.
  52. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-10-08. Retrieved 2007-06-12.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  53. ^ "Manhasset Press". Anton Media Group. Retrieved 2020-08-10.
  54. ^ a b Antonio, Bill San (2013-05-30). "Film production begins in Munsey Park cul-de-sac". The Island Now. Retrieved 2021-06-14.
  55. ^ "Tina Fey, Jason Bateman film in LI village". Newsday. Retrieved 2021-06-14.

External links[edit]