Munster Under-21 Hurling Championship

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Munster GAA Hurling Under-21 Championship
Current season or competition:
2016 Munster Under-21 Hurling Championship
Flag of Munster.svg
Irish Craobh Iomána Fé-21 na Mumhan
Founded 1964
Region Munster (GAA)
Trophy Corn na Cásca
No. of teams 5
Title holders Waterford (4th title)
Most titles Tipperary (20 titles)
Sponsors Bord Gáis Energy
TV partner(s) TG4
Official website http://www.bgeu21.ie/

The Munster GAA Hurling All-Ireland Under-21 Championship is an annual championship of hurling for male players under the age of 21 and is organized by the Munster Council of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). The championship has been awarded every year since the first tournament in 1964. It is sponsored by Bord Gáis Energy.[1]

The series of games are played during the summer months with the Munster final currently being played in July. The prize for the winning team is the Corn na Cásca, a cup that was first presented in 1966 by the Munster Council in honour of the golden jubilee of the Easter Rising. The championship had always been played on a straight knock-out basis whereby once a team lost they are eliminated from the series.

The Munster Championship is an integral part of the wider All-Ireland Under-21 Hurling Championship. The winners of the Munster final join Galway, the Leinster champions and the Ulster champions in the semi-final stages of the All-Ireland series of games.

Five teams currently participate in the Munster Championship. Tipperary is the most successful team with 20 titles, followed by Cork with 18 titles. The title has been won by five different teams, all of whom have won the title more than once.

Waterford are the current holders.[2]

History[edit]

The Munster Under-21 Hurling Championship began in 1964 in response to a Congress motion put forward by the Kerry County Board for the introduction of a new championship grade. It was the fifth championship to be created after the senior, junior, minor and intermediate grades.

In 2008 a radical motion was brought before a special Congress in an effort to combat player burnout. It was proposed to merge the existing under-21 and minor championships to create a new All-Ireland Under-19 Hurling Championship based on the provincial system.[3] This motion was defeated by 115 votes to 58.[4]

A similar motion was later introduced in an effort to lower the age and create a new All-Ireland Under-20 Championship based on the provincial system, however, this motion was also defeated.[5]

Format[edit]

The Munster Championship is a knockout tournament with pairings drawn at random – there are no seeds.

Each match is played as a single leg. If a match is drawn there is extra time and, if the sides still remain level, a replay is required.

The format has remained the same since the very first Munster Championship in 1964. An open draw is made in which three of the five teams automatically qualify for the semi-final stage of the competition. Two other teams play in a lone quarter-final with the winner joining the other three teams at the semi-final stage. Once a team is defeated they are eliminated from the championship.

The Munster Championship has wider implications for the All-Ireland Under-21 Hurling Championship. The winners of the Munster final automatically qualify for the semi-final stages of the All-Ireland series of games. Unlike the final runners-up in the minor and senior championships, there is no 'back-door system' at under-21 level.

Five of the six counties of Munster – Clare, Cork, Limerick, Tipperary and Waterford – participate in the championship. Kerry, the sixth county in the province, previously contested the championship until recently, however, they currently field a team in the All-Ireland Under-21 B Hurling Championship.

Trophy[edit]

At the end of the Munster final, the winning team is presented with a trophy. The cup, named Corn na Cásca, is held by the winning team until the following year's final. Traditionally, the presentation is made at a special rostrum in the stand where GAA and political dignitaries and special guests view the match.

The cup is decorated with ribbons in the colours of the winning team. During the game the cup actually has both teams' sets of ribbons attached and the runners-up ribbons are removed before the presentation. The winning captain accepts the cup on behalf of his team before giving a short speech. Individual members of the winning team then have an opportunity to come to the rostrum to lift the cup.

The present trophy was presented by the Munster Council in 1966 to commemorate the golden jubilee of the Easter Rising.[6]

Sponsorship[edit]

Since 2003 the Munster Championship has been sponsored. The sponsor has usually been able to determine the championship's sponsorship name. The list below details who the sponsors have been and what they called the competition:

  • 2003–2007: Erin Foods (Erin Munster Under-21 Hurling Championship)
  • 2008–present: Bord Gáis Energy (Bord Gáis Energy Munster GAA Hurling Under-21 Championship)

Munster Championship moments[edit]

  • Tipperary 1–16 : 2–12 Clare (July 30, 2008 at Cusack Park) – A controversial end to a close game of hurling. The provincial final looked to be heading to extra time, however, as the game entered the dying seconds Clare were awarded a free in front of the Tipperary posts. The referee's attention, however, was then drawn by one of his umpires at the other end of the field who pointed out that Clare goalkeeper Donal Tuohy had, for the second time, stepped outside the small square with his last puckout. The referee then cancelled the Clare free, gave Tipperary a 65-metre free which was pointed by Pa Bourke to hand Tipp the title. Upon the final whistle Clare and Tipperary fans invaded the pitch. In the ensuing situation some Clare fans staged a seated protest and booed the presentation of the trophy to Tipperary. The referee and the umpire were both escorted from the pitch by Gardaí while being jostled and challenged by some of the Clare supporters.[7]

General statistics[edit]

Performance by county[edit]

County Wins Runners-up Years won Years runner-up
1 Tipperary 20 12 1964, 1965, 1967, 1972, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1989, 1990, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2012, 2013, 2016
2 Cork 18 11 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1982, 1988, 1991, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2005, 2007 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1987, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2011, 2014
3 Limerick 7 11 1986, 1987, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2011, 2015 1966, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1982, 1984, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993
4 Clare 4 14 2009, 2012, 2013, 2014 1972, 1974, 1976, 1983, 1985, 1986, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2008, 2010, 2015
Waterford 4 3 1974, 1992, 1994, 2016 1964, 2007, 2009
6 Galway 0 2 1965, 1967

Records[edit]

Final[edit]

Team[edit]

  • Most titles: 20:
    • Tipperary (1964, 1965, 1967, 1972, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1989, 1990, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010)
  • Most consecutive title wins: 4, joint record:
    • Cork (1968, 1969, 1970, 1971)
    • Tipperary (1978, 1979, 1980, 1981)
  • Most appearances in a final: 32:
    • Tipperary (1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1989, 1990, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2016)
  • Most appearances without winning: 2:

Individual[edit]

Biggest Munster final wins[edit]

  • The most one sided Munster finals:

Miscellaneous[edit]

  • Mick Malone of Cork holds the record of being the only player to win four consecutive Munster under-21 winners' medals on the field of play. These victories came in 1968, 1969, 1970 and 1971.
  • Cork and Tipperary jointly hold the record for the longest streak of success. Both counties have won four-in-a-row with Cork's coming between 1968 and 1971 and Tipperary's coming a decade later between 1978 and 1981.
  • Cork hold the record for the most consecutive appearances in Munster finals. They played in eight-in-a-row between 1975 and 1982, not including a replay in 1978, with success coming on four of those occasions.
  • Clare lost twelve Munster finals, not including a replay in 1986, before winning their first in 2009.
  • Two counties have completed the Munster under-21 and senior double in the same year:
    • Cork in 1966, 1969, 1970, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1982, 2005
    • Tipperary in 1964, 1965, 1967, 1989, 2008
  • Cork is the only county to have completed the Munster minor, under-21 and senior treble in the same year. These feats were achieved in 1966, 1969, 1970, 1975, 1977 and 2005.
  • Cork is the only county to have completed the Munster minor, under-21, intermdiate and senior 'grand slam' in the same year. This was achieved in 2005.
  • Five players have captained their counties to Munster titles in both the under-21 and senior grades:
    • Gerald McCarthy captained Cork to the under-21 title in 1966 and the senior titles in 1966 and 1975.
    • Eoin Kelly captained Tipperary to the under-21 title in 2003 and the senior title in 2008.
  • Five players have captained their counties to Munster titles in both the minor and under-21 grades:
    • Anthony O'Riordan captained Limerick to the minor title in 1984 and the under-21 title in 1986.
    • Diarmaid FitzGerald captained Tipperary to the minor title in 2001 and the under-21 title in 2004.
    • Shane O'Neill captained Cork to the minor title in 2004 and the under-21 title in 2007.
    • Paul Flanagan captained Clare to the minor title in 2010 and the Under-21 title in 2013.
    • Tony Kelly captained Clare to the minor title in 2011 and the Under-21 title in 2014.

List of Munster Finals[edit]

All-Ireland champions
All-Ireland runners-up
Year Winners Score Runners-up Score Venue Winning Captain
1964 Tipperary 8–9 Waterford 3–1 Walsh Park Francis Loughnane
1965 Tipperary 4–9 Galway 3–3 Dunlo GAA Grounds Owen Killoran
1966 Cork 5–12 Limerick 2–6 Cork Athletic Grounds Gerald McCarthy
1967 Tipperary 3–9 Galway 3–5 Gaelic Grounds P.J. Ryan
1968 Cork 4–10 Tipperary 1–13 Thurles Sportsfield Pat Hegarty
1969 Cork 3–11 Tipperary 1–5 Cork Athletic Grounds Donal Clifford
1970 Cork 3–11 Tipperary 2–7 Thurles Sportsfield Teddy O'Brien
1971 Cork 5–11 Tipperary 4–9 Cork Athletic Grounds Pat McDonnell
1972 Tipperary 4–10 Clare 3–10 Cusack Park Willie Ryan
1973 Cork 4–11 Limerick 2–7 Charleville GAA Grounds Martin O'Doherty
1974 Waterford 2–5 Clare 1–3 Pat McGrath
1975 Cork 3–12 Limerick 2–6 Gaelic Grounds Frank O'Sullivan
1976 Cork 2–11 Clare 3-6 Gaelic Grounds Tadhg Murphy
1977 Cork 5–9 Limerick 1–8 Kilmallock Tom Lyons
1978 Tipperary 3-8 (3–13) Cork 2-9 (4–10) Páirc Uí Chaoimh (Semple Stadium) Pat Fitzelle
1979 Tipperary 1–13 Cork 2–7 Semple Stadium Michael Doyle
1980 Tipperary 4–11 Cork 2–9 Páirc Mac Gearailt P. J. Maxwell
1981 Tipperary 1–15 Cork 0–10 Semple Stadium Philip Kennedy
1982 Cork 1–14 Limerick 1–4 FitzGerald Park Martin McCarthy
1983 Tipperary 2–17 Clare 3–8 Cusack Park Denis Finnerty
1984 Tipperary 0–12 Limerick 1–8 Gaelic Grounds Donal Kealy
1985 Tipperary 1–16 Clare 4–5 Semple Stadium Michael Scully
1986 Limerick 2-10 (3–9) Clare 0-3 (3–9) Anthony O'Riordan
1987 Limerick 3–14 Cork 2–9 Bruff Sportsfield Gussie Ryan
1988 Cork 4–12 Limerick 1–7 Clonmult Memorial Park Christy Connery
1989 Tipperary 5–16 Limerick 1–6 Semple Stadium Declan Ryan
1990 Tipperary 2–21 Limerick 1–11 Gaelic Grounds John Leahy
1991 Cork 0–17 Limerick 1–7 FitzGerald Park Brian Cunningham
1992 Waterford 0–17 Clare 1–12 Semple Stadium Tony Browne
1993 Cork 1–18 Limerick 3–9 Páirc Uí Chaoimh Fergal O'Mahony
1994 Waterford 1–12 Clare 0–12 Páirc Mac Gearailt James O'Connor
1995 Tipperary 1–17 Clare 0–14 Semple Stadium Brian Horgan
1996 Cork 3–16 Clare 2–7 Semple Stadium Seánie McGrath
1997 Cork 1–11 Tipperary 0–13 Semple Stadium, Thurles Dan Murphy
1998 Cork 3–18 Tipperary 1–10 Páirc Uí Chaoimh Dan Murphy
1999 Tipperary 1–18 Clare 1–15 Cusack Park, Ennis William Hickey
2000 Limerick 4-18 (1–13) Cork 1-6 (1–13) Gaelic Grounds (Páirc Uí Chaoimh]]) Donncha Sheehan
2001 Limerick 3–14 Tipperary 2–16 Gaelic Grounds Timmy Houlihan
2002 Limerick 1–20 Tipperary 2–14 Semple Stadium Peter Lawlor
2003 Tipperary 2–14 Cork 0–17 Páirc Uí Chaoimh Eoin Kelly
2004 Tipperary 1–16 Cork 1–13 Semple Stadium Diarmaid FitzGerald
2005 Cork 4–8 Tipperary 0–13 Páirc Uí Chaoimh Pat FitzGerald
2006 Tipperary 3–11 Cork 0–13 Semple Stadium David Young
2007 Cork 1–20 Waterford 0–10 Walsh Park Shane O'Neill
2008 Tipperary 1–16 Clare 2–12 Cusack Park Séamus Hennessy
2009 Clare 2–17 Waterford 2–12 Fraher Field Ciarán O'Doherty
2010 Tipperary 1–22 Clare 1–17 Semple Stadium Pádraic Maher[8]
2011 Limerick 4-20 Cork 1-27 Gaelic Grounds Kevin Downes[9]
2012 Clare 1-16 Tipperary 1-14 Cusack Park Conor McGrath[10]
2013 Clare 1-17 Tipperary 2-10 Semple Stadium Paul Flanagan[11]
2014 Clare 1-28 Cork 1-13 Cusack Park Tony Kelly[12]
2015 Limerick 0-22 Clare 0-19 Cusack Park Diarmaid Byrnes[13]
2016 Waterford 2-19 Tipperary 0-15 Walsh Park Adam Farrell/Patrick Curran[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bord Gais to sponsor U-21 hurling championship". Irish Examiner. 28 July 2008. Retrieved 19 September 2015. 
  2. ^ "Munster U21 HC final: devastating Deise power past Tipp". Hogan Stand. 27 July 2016. Retrieved 27 July 2016. 
  3. ^ O'Riordan, Ian (23 January 2008). "Merge needs simple majority". Irish Times. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  4. ^ "GAA delegates reject U-19 proposal". RTÉ Sport. 26 January 2008. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  5. ^ O'Riordan, Ian (11 September 2008). "Under-20 championship proposed". Irish Times. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  6. ^ "What's in a name? Trophies reveal intriguing histories". Irish Examiner. 14 July 2012. Retrieved 13 September 2015. 
  7. ^ Irish Independent report, "U21 final marred by violent scenes"
  8. ^ Cahill, Jackie (2010-07-29). "Murphy's late flurry guides Tipp over the line". Irish Independent. Independent News & Media. Retrieved 2010-07-31. 
  9. ^ "Extra special win for Limerick". Irish Examiner. 4 August 2011. Retrieved 4 August 2011. 
  10. ^ "Munster U21HC final: Niall Arthur is the toast of Clare". Hogan Stand. 8 August 2012. Retrieved 11 August 2012. 
  11. ^ "Banner's rise irresistible". Irish Examiner. 8 August 2013. Retrieved 8 August 2013. 
  12. ^ "Clare storm to Munster hat-trick against Cork as journey gathers pace". Irish Independent. 30 July 2014. Retrieved 31 July 2014. 
  13. ^ "Munster U21HC final: Treaty Lynch Banner". Hogan Stand. 30 July 2015. Retrieved 30 July 2015. 
  14. ^ "Munster U21 HC final: devastating Deise power past Tipp". Hogan Stand. 27 July 2016. Retrieved 27 July 2016. 

Sources[edit]