Muqaddam

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Military ranks of Egypt
Turco-Egyptian
ranks
(until 1958)
Modern
Egyptian ranks
Western
equivalents
Officers
Mushir
مشير
General of the army/
field marshal
Sirdar
سردار
Fariq awwal
فريق أول
General
Fariq
فريق
Lieutenant general
Liwa
لواء
Major general
Amiralay
أمير آلاي
Amid
عميد
Brigadier
Qaimaqam
قائم مقام
Aqid
عقيد
Colonel
Bimbashi
بكباشي
Muqaddam
مقدم
Lieutenant colonel
Sagh
صاغ
Raid
رائد
Major
Yuzbashi
يوزباشي
Naqib
نقيب
Captain
Mulazim awwal
ملازم أول
First lieutenant
Mulazim thani
ملازم ثاني
Mulazim
ملازم
Second lieutenant
Non-commissioned officers
Shawish
شاويش
Raqib
رقيب
Sergeant
Ombashi
أونباشي
Arif
عريف
Corporal
Soldiers
Askari
عسكري
Jundi
جندي
Private

Muqaddam is an Arabic title, adopted in other Islamic cultures, for any of various civil or religious officials. The literal meaning is something like "expediter", "facilitator", or "assistant".

  • in the Tijaniyyah, Shadhiliyyah, and other Sufi orders, a muqaddam is a student of the Sufi path (a murid or dervish) who has been authorized by his/her Guide (aka shaikh, pir, or murshid) to assist in teaching the path to other students.
  • in Bengal, the muqaddam (in some places he was called mukhiya) was the village headman, through whom the government dealt with the peasants.
  • As per the Persian documents of medieval India, a muqaddam was the headman of a village. He was, by profession, a peasant of the village which he headed. He could sell and buy land for the village and settle the common treasury. His position was hereditary; however, it could also be bought and sold. He was never a government servant, but he could be dispossessed of his status by the revenue official.[1]
  • in Mount Lebanon, the Muqaddams were the secular leaders of their religious community. The last Muqaddams disappeared in the beginning of the 16th Century.
  • in the militaries (generally ground forces and sometimes air forces) of several Arab nations, Muqaddam is equivalent to the Anglophone rank of lieutenant colonel.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Habib, Irfan: The Agrarian System of Mughal India, Oxford University Press, 2004, ISBN 0-19-565595-8, pp. 160–161.
  2. ^ Army officer ranks