Murder of Jimmy Hendricks and Kim Mills

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Murder of Jimmy Hendricks and Kim Mills
JHendricksKMills.jpg
Hendricks and Mills prior to their disappearences
DateJune 17, 1978 (1978-06-17)
LocationPemiscot County, Missouri, United States
CauseHomicide by firearm
Participants
  • Jimmy Hendricks (fatality)
  • Kim Mills (fatality)
  • Unidentified subject(s) (perpetrator)
OutcomeIdentified
Jimmy was identified in May 2017. Kim was positively identified on February 2, 2018.
Deaths2
InquiriesActive investigation

James "Jimmy" Hendricks and Kimberlin "Kim" Mills are murder victims who were discovered on June 17, 1978. The pair were believed to have been seen together at a truck stop in Missouri, which is where the murders took place. Kim was found in Mississippi County, Arkansas and Jimmy was left at the presumed murder scene.[1][2]

Jimmy was identified in May 2017, Kim's ID was confirmed in late 2017 and her identity was released publicly in early February 2018.[3] Neither had been reported missing. Both were from Michigan.[4]

Case[edit]

A white male and female were discovered on June 17, 1978 in Pemiscot County, Missouri and Blytheville, Mississippi County, Arkansas, respectively. Although they were found 15 miles from each other, they were likely murdered by the same person, as the pair were reportedly seen together before the murders at a truck stop in the same town and were believed to have been dropped off by a man. They are presumed to have been killed by the same individual or individuals.[5]

Due to flooding, their case files were damaged, including the loss of their fingerprint records, although their dental charts and DNA information remain intact.[6][7] In September 2017, both victims were identified.[5]

Victims[edit]

Reconstructions of the victims

The male victim's age range was between 25 and his early 30s.[8] This would place his birth between c. 1948 and 1953. He was discovered in Pemiscot County, Missouri, where it is believed the murders took place.[6][7][9] He had blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion with freckles. This victim had a tattoo on his right arm, which consisted of the letters "J" and "H." He was estimated to be five feet eight inches tall and at a weight of 130 to 140 pounds. He had a distinctive vertical scar on his forehead, the cause of which is unknown. He wore a red shirt containing a graphic of a woman enclosed inside of a circle, with the words "hot sauce" underneath. Other clothing included size nine or ten boots and blue jeans. Some of his teeth were reported to have been missing.[8]

Unlike his companion, who was shot once, he had suffered three to his neck and head. [5]

The woman was between 18 and 25, although she could have been as old as 35.[6] This would place her birth between c. 1943 and 1960. Her hair was naturally brown, but was likely dyed blond, as its color was darker toward the roots. The word "Kim" was amateurishly tattooed on her right arm, which could possibly have been her own or her child's name, as her autopsy concluded that she had borne at least one child. Some of her teeth had yet to erupt.[2][6] She was shot once in the head with a shotgun.[6] Her possessions included a mercury dime necklace and a multicolored striped shirt and jeans.[1][7]

Identification[edit]

Hendricks's identity was confirmed first, in May 2017. His DNA was matched to his sister, June. Additionally, fingerprints from the victim were linked to those taken by the Michigan Department of Corrections; Hendricks had served a prison term in Michigan for an unspecified offense. After his relatives were contacted by police with questions about his female companion, they informed the investigators of his girlfriend at the time. Mills' brother's DNA was later obtained and was matched to her remains. The couple had not been reported missing due to the belief that they left Michigan due to Hendricks's parole agreement.[10] The pair had planned to leave for Texas and return home after seven years, according to Hendricks' sister.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Jane Doe 1978". missingkids.org. National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Case File 449UFAR". doenetwork.org. The Doe Network. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  3. ^ "Identified after 39 Years". National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. 2 February 2018. Retrieved 3 February 2018.
  4. ^ Carl Koppelman
  5. ^ a b c d "Remains discovered 40 years ago linked to Michigan couple". 25 News. NBC. 5 February 2018. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e "Investigation relaunched; can you help identify 1978 murder victims?". WMC Action News. 25 April 2014. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  7. ^ a b c "NamUs UP # 5158". identifyus.org. 2 May 2009. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  8. ^ a b "Case File: 2337UMMO". doenetwork.org. The Doe Network. Retrieved 19 September 2014.
  9. ^ "John and Jane Doe Case File: The file of a young, unknown couple killed along Interstate 55 in Summer 1978". WMC Action News. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  10. ^ Kent, AnnMarie (6 February 2018). "Cadillac family helps break open 40-year-old cold case". UpNorth Live. Retrieved 12 April 2018.