Murray Shanahan

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Murray Shanahan
Alma materImperial College London Cambridge University
Scientific career
FieldsArtificial intelligence
InstitutionsImperial College London DeepMind
Websitehttp://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~mpsha/

Murray Shanahan is a Professor of Cognitive Robotics at Imperial College London,[1] in the Department of Computing. He researches artificial intelligence, robotics, and cognitive science.

Outreach[edit]

Shanahan was a scientific advisor for the 2014 film Ex Machina.[2] He is on the external advisory board for the Cambridge Centre for the Study of Existential Risk, and is on the six-person ethics board for Texan startup Lucid.AI.[3]

Popular science books[edit]

In 2015, Shanahan published The Technological Singularity, which runs through various scenarios following the invention of an artificial intelligence that makes better versions of itself and rapidly outcompetes humans.[4] The book aims to be an evenhanded primer on the issues surrounding superhuman intelligence.[5] Shanahan takes the view that we do not know how superintelligences will behave: whether they will be friendly or hostile, predictable or inscrutable.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "How to make a digital human brain". Fox News. 13 June 2013. Retrieved 8 March 2016.
  2. ^ "AI: will the machines ever rise up?". The Guardian. 26 June 2015. Retrieved 8 March 2016.
  3. ^ "The biggest mystery in AI right now is the ethics board that Google set up after buying DeepMind". Business Insider. 26 March 2016. Retrieved 22 April 2016.
  4. ^ "Autumn's science books weigh up humanity's future options". New Scientist. 9 September 2015. Retrieved 8 March 2016.
  5. ^ 2015 Library Journal review of The Technological Singularity by Murray Shanahan. "This evenhanded primer on a topic whose significance is becoming increasingly recognized ought, as per its inclusion in this series, to receive wide exposure."
  6. ^ Sidney Perkowitz on The Technological Singularity and Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground Between Humans and Robots, LA Review of Books, February 18, 2016