Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia

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Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia
Shenandoah Homestead (6613546223).jpg
Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia is located in Shenandoah Valley
Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia
Location within Shenandoah Valley
Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia is located in Virginia
Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia
Location within Shenandoah Valley
Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia is located in the US
Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia
Location within Shenandoah Valley
Location Staunton, Virginia, USA
Coordinates Coordinates: 38°7′28.5″N 79°2′58″W / 38.124583°N 79.04944°W / 38.124583; -79.04944
Type Living History
Website Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia

The Frontier Culture Museum, located in Staunton, Virginia is a living history museum that tells the story of the people who migrated from the Old World to America and the life they created in the Shenandoah Valley. The Museum is made up of original or reproduced examples of traditional buildings from the Old World and America.

History[edit]

The Avenue of Trees was made of Bradford pear trees planted as a memorial to area residents killed during war. [1] The Bradford pear trees did not endure frost and wind well so those trees were replaced with chestnuts, oaks, and apple trees.[2] The museum hosts public lecture like "Beers of Our Founding Fathers: An Overview of Brewing in the 18th Century" by Colonial Williamsburg Historic Foodways Supervisor Frank Clark, "Role of Women in Cidering and Distilling in the Colonial Chesapeake" by Virginia Commonwealth University associate professor Sarah Meacham, and "Belmont Vineyard and the 19th Century Wine Industry in the Virginia Blue Ridge" by James Madison University associate professor Carole Nash.[3]

Operations[edit]

Many of the early immigrants to the Shenandoah Valley were farmers seeking opportunities for a better life. The Museum’s Old World Exhibits include an Igbo West African Farm, an English Farm, an Irish Farm, an Irish Forge, and a German Farm. These people eventually became Americans and contributed to the success of the colonies and the United States. The Museum’s growing American Exhibits currently comprise an Eastern Woodland Indian exhibit, a 1740s American Settlement, an 1820s American Farm, an 1850s American Farm, and an Early American Schoolhouse.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Peters, Laura (March 7, 2017). "Frontier Culture reorganizes management". USA Today. Staunton News Leader. 
  2. ^ Peters, Laura (Jan 8, 2017). "Frontier development worries residents". USA Today. Staunton News Leader. 
  3. ^ Calello, Monique (March 13, 2017). "Whiskey and Washington in Frontier Culture spotlight". USA Today. Staunton News Leader. 
  4. ^ Exhibits:
    Austin, Alana (Mar 28, 2014). "Frontier Culture Museum Exhibit Plants Riesling Grapes". NBC29. 
    Borns, Patricia (Nov 4, 2014). "Fire claims huts at Frontier Culture Museum". USA Today. Staunton News Leader. 
    Calello, Monique (June 3, 2015). "New exhibit opens at Frontier Culture Museum". USA Today. Staunton News Leader. 
    Stuart, Bob (Apr 6, 2016). "Fire damages 1700s farm at Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton". Waynesboro News Virginian. 

See also[edit]