Museum of Applied Arts, Vienna

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MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art
Wien 01 Museum für angewandte Kunst a.jpg
Museum of Applied Arts in Vienna, Austria
Former name k. k. Österreichisches Museum für Kunst und Industrie
Established 1864
Location Stubenring 5, Vienna
Type Design Museum
Director Christoph Thun-Hohenstein
Architect Heinrich von Ferstel
Public transit access
Website www.mak.at

The MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art is an arts and crafts museum at the Stubenring in Vienna's 1st district Innere Stadt. Besides its traditional focus on arts and crafts and design, it also has a special focus on architecture and contemporary art.[1]

History[edit]

On 7 March 1863, the Imperial Royal Museum of Art and Industry - today's MAK - was founded by Emperor Franz Joseph I. and Rudolf von Eitelberger, first professor of art history at the University of Vienna, was appointed director. The museum essentially followed the example of the South Kensington Museum (today’s Victoria and Albert Museum) in London, founded in 1852 and it should serve as a model collection for artists, industrialists and the public as well as a training and further education centre for designers and craftsmen. On 12 May 1864, the museum opened initially in a provisional location, adjacent to the Vienna Hofburg in a section of the Ballhaus building adapted by architect Heinrich von Ferstel to serve as a museum.

With the establishment of the k.k. Wiener Kunstgewerbeschule (Vienna School of Arts and Crafts) in 1967, theoretical and practical training was united. At first, the school was housed in the former gun factory at Währinger Straße 11–1 /Schwarzspanierstraße 17 (today the Anatomical Institute of the Medical University of Vienna, newly built in 1886) and was only located at Stubenring 3 following an extension to the Imperial Royal Museum of Art and Industry and opened in 1877.

1897, Arthur von Scala, until then director of the Royal Middle Eastern Museum (later Royal Austrian Trade Museum), takes over as director of the Museum of Art and Industry, bringing Otto Wagner, Felician von Myrbach, Koloman Moser, Josef Hoffmann and Alfred Roller on board to work at the museum and at the School of Arts and Crafts. Due to conflicts between Scala and the Arts and Crafts Association (founded in 1884), who sees his influence on the museum beginning to wane, Archduke Rainer resigns 1898 as the museum’s protector. New statutes were drawn up. Two years later, around 1900, the museum and the School of Arts and Crafts each received their own separate administration, although their final separation did not take place until 1909: The museum was placed under the aegis of the Ministry of Culture and Education, the school stayed at the Royal Ministry of Cultus and Education. In 1907, the Museum of Art and Industry took over most of the collection of the Royal Austrian Trade Museum.

The MAK around 1880

From 1865 to 1897, the Museum of Art and Industry also published the magazine Mittheilungen des k. k. Österreichischen Museums für Kunst und Industrie (Transactions of the Imperial Royal Austrian Museum of Art and Industry). From 1898 to 1921, however, the Museum Journal was published with the new name Kunst und Kunsthandwerk and soon gained international reputation. The museum began publishing the periodical alte und moderne kunst (old and modern art).

After the establishment of the First Republic, the holdings previously in the possession of the Habsburgs—e.g. oriental carpets—were handed over to the Museum. In 1936 and 1940, the Museum on Stubenring gave part of its sculpture collection to the Kunsthistorisches Museum [Museum of Art History]. In exchange, it received the arts and crafts section of the collections of Albert Figdor and of the Kunsthistorisches Museum. Following Austria’s annexation by Nazi Germany, the museum was renamed “Staatliches Kunstgewerbemuseum in Wien” (State Arts and Crafts Museum in Vienna). Between 1939 and 1945, Austria’s museums take over several confiscated private collections. The collection of the “State Arts and Crafts Museum” also expanded in this way. Since 1998, numerous works of art have been restituted to their owners as a result of provenance research.

In 1947, the “Staatliches Kunstgewerbemuseum in Wien” was renamed “Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst” (Austrian Museum of Applied Arts). In 1949, the museum reopened following the repair of war-related damage. In 1965, the Geymüllerschlössel in the 18th district of Vienna becomes a branch of the museum. Together with the building, Franz Sobek’s important collection of old Viennese clocks from the period between 1760 and the second half of the 19th century likewise joins the MAK Collection, as does furniture made between 1800 and 1840. At the end of the 1980s, parts of the mural paintings were restored to their original condition during the renovation of the façade. The subsequent repositioning of the furnishings and the extraordinary collection of watches in the rooms of the Geymüllerschlössel allows visitors a true to original insight into the variety of Biedermeier furnishing art.[2]

The Arenbergpark Flak Tower - one of the six flak towers erected in Vienna during World War II - becomes a branch of the MAK in 1994. From 1995 to 2011, it served as the MAK Depot of Contemporary Art, (MAK Tower), which housed essential parts of the MAK Contemporary Art Collection. Later, the MAK Tower had to be closed to the public due to a lack of official approvals.[3]

After a MAK exhibition about Josef Hoffmann in 1992 in his birthplace in Brtnice/Pirnitz (Czech Republic), contacts with the Moravian Gallery in Brno were intensified. Since 2006, both institutions have been running Hoffmann's birthplace as the Josef Hoffmann Museum in the form of a joint branch. Since 2005, the house in Brtnice has been playing host to temporary exhibitions featuring themes related to Hoffman and his circle with the aim of keeping the life and work of this pioneering Austrian architect alive in the public consciousness.[4]

In 1994, MAK established the MAK Center for Art and Architecture in Los Angeles, USA, which is now housed in three important buildings designed by Viennese architect Rudolph M. Schindler in Los Angeles (Rudolph Schindler House, Pearl M. Mackey Apartment House, Fitzpatrick-Leland House). The focus is on new trends and interdisciplinary developments in the fields of fine arts and architecture, which are pushed ahead with scholarships and projects and expanded by changing exhibitions.[5]

An important field of action of the MAK is its presentation in public space. The museum actively supports contemporary artists, whose works are mostly presented in an exhibition in the MAK building and later as works of art in Vienna's urban space in order to mediate at the interface between art and public space. International artists such as James Turrell (MAKlite, Permanent installation on the façade of the MAK since 2004, Stubenring 5, 1010 Vienna[6]), Michael Kienzer (Stylit, 2005, Stubenring/Weiskirchnerstraße, 1010 Vienna[7]), Franz West (4 Larvae (Lemur Heads) 2001, Stubenbrücke, 1010 Vienna[8]), Donald Judd (Stage Set, 1996, Stadtpark, 1030 Vienna[9]) and Philip Johnson (Wiener Trio, 1998, Franz-Josefs-Kai/Schottenring, opposite Ringturm, 1010 Vienna[10]) are represented.

In 2000, Austria’s federal museums were removed from state administration; the museum becomes a “public-law academic institution.”

In 2015, the MAK initiated the Vienna Biennale, the first Biennale to combine art, design and architecture. It lasted from 11 June to 4 October 2015 and was initiated by the MAK in partnership with the University of Applied Arts Vienna, Kunsthalle Wien, the Architekturzentrum Wien, and the Vienna Business Agency, creative center departure, and organized with support from the AIT Austrian Institute of Technology as a non-university research partner. The second Vienna Biennale took place from 21 June to 1 October 2017.

Christoph Thun-Hohenstein at the MAK

Directors[edit]

  • Rudolf Eitelberger (1863–1885)
  • Jacob von Falke (1885–1895)
  • Bruno Bucher (1895–1897)
  • Arthur von Scala (1897–1909)
  • Eduard Leisching (1909–1925)
  • Hermann Trenkwald (1925–1927)
  • August Schestag (1927–1932)
  • Richard Ernst (1932–1950)
  • Ignaz Schlosser (1950–1958)
  • Viktor Griessmaier (1958–1968)
  • Wilhelm Mrazek (1968–1978)
  • Gerhard Egger (1978–1981)
  • Herbert Fux (1981–1984)
  • Ludwig Neustifter (Interim. director, 1984–1986)
  • Peter Noever (1986–2011)
  • Martina Kandeler-Fritsch (Interim. director, Februar to August 2011)
  • Christoph Thun-Hohenstein (since September 2011)

In 2016, Christoph Thun-Hohenstein was appointed as director of the MAK for another 5 years. At the same time, Teresa Mitterlehner-Marchesani was appointed Economic Director in the course of the introduction of the double management in the Austrian federal museums.

Building[edit]

Inner courtyard of the museum

From 1869, a new museum complex for the Imperial Royal Museum of Art and Industry was built at Stubenring 5 in the style of the Neo-Renaissance, according to plans by Heinrich von Ferstel. The painter Ferdinand Laufberger made a frieze in sgraffito and the fresco paintings on the mirror vault of the staircase. On 15 November 1871, the museum opened to the public within a big opening. It was the first museum building on the Vienna Ring Road. Laufberger's cartoons were lost, and so around 1893 the mural painting of the figures on the outer façade were recreated by students of Karl Karger of the School of Applied Arts. In 1875 the Austrian Museum was joined by an adjacent new building for the School of Applied Arts at Stubenring 3, whose plans were also drawn up by Heinrich von Ferstel. It was opened in 1877.

For the unforgettable teacher Ferdinand Laufberger

In 1906, Ludwig Baumann designed an extension building for the museum located at Weiskirchnerstraße 3, it was completed in 1908. After the Second World War, the museum building was repaired until 1949

In 1989, a complete renovation of the museum’s old buildings and construction of both a two-story underground depot and a connecting wing by with a generous storage facility and additional exhibition space began. After this renovation, the museum opened in 1993. Its showrooms were designed by artists such as Barbara Bloom, Eichinger or Knechtl, Günther Förg, Gangart, Franz Graf, Jenny Holzer, Donald Judd, Peter Noever, Manfred Wakolbinger and Heimo Zobernig. In 2014, a repositioning of the Permanent Collection Carpets with an artistic intervention by Füsun Onur and a repositioning of the Permanent Collection Asia, whose artistic design was entrusted to Tadashi Kawamata in 2014 and 2016, took place.

The building in the Weiskirchnerstraße is restricted to temporary exhibitions, while the premises at Stubenring house the Permanent Collection and the MAK Design Lab.

MAK Permanent Collection[edit]

In accordance with its historical justification, the MAK Permanent collection is divided into different sections according to its functional purpose.[11]

Highlights of the collection are the holdings of the Wiener Werkstätte, chairs by Thonet and Kohn, furniture by Danhauser, Gustav Klimt's cartoons for the Mosaic Frieze of Stoclet Palace, Du Paquier’s Porcelain Cabinet chamber from Dubsky Palace, a collection of Bohemian and Venetian glass, Flemish and Italian lace, silver, porcelain and carpets as well as Chinese porcelain, Japanese colored woodcuts (Ukiyo-e) and Japanese printing stencils (Katagami).

MAK Design Lab[edit]

Visitors in the MAK Design Lab

On the occasion of its 150th anniversary, the MAK positioned itself more clearly than ever before as a museum for arts and the everyday world. Until 2014, the MAK Study Collection presented part of its extensive holdings in a material-specific technological order. In the course of this repositioning of the former study collection, MAK cooperated with the Austrian design team EOOS and the IDRV - Institute of Design Research Vienna in order to make cross-links between 21st century art and earlier epochs directly tangible.[12]

Frankfurt kitchen by Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky in the MAK-study collection

Since its transformation into the MAK Design Lab, almost 2,000 exhibits - divided into themed islands - have created a newly conceived showcase in the entire basement of the museum for lifelike references between historical arts and crafts and contemporary design. Interactive thematic areas form an illustrative course on areas such as cooking (including a replica of Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky's Frankfurt kitchen), eating and drinking, sitting, artistic, industrial and alternative production, transporting, communicating and ornament, and the Helmut Lang Archive, which shows the artistic highlights with selected designs.[13]

The newly created passageways and modular units lead to a connecting spatial experience and allow rapid adaptation to changing requirements. The MAK Forum forms a flexibly usable space, which is used as a meeting place as well as an experimental area for exhibitions and mediation formats.

In the MAK Works on Paper Room there are changing exhibitions - mainly from the holdings of the MAK Library and Works on Paper Collection - which present posters, architectural projects, stylistic copies or Japanese wood prints in their thematic diversity.

The MAK Library and Works on Paper Collection provides information on all areas of applied art. The literature covers the period from the 16th century to the present day, with some manuscripts, incunables and printed works ranging from the 15th century to the present day. The Works on Paper Collection's holdings include ornamental engravings, posters, photos, drawings, watercolours and plans as well as drawings from the archive of Wiener Werkstätte.

The MAK Contemporary Art Collection serves as a presentation space for contemporary projects by international artists, among other things in dealing with topics of the time Vienna around 1900.

Through its MAK Collection Online, the MAK makes parts of its holdings freely accessible to the public:

  • Japanese colored woodcuts / Ukiyo-e
  • East Asian Art
  • Late Antiquity Textiles
  • Plakate
  • Posters
  • Ornament prints
  • Wiener Werkstätte - Drawings
  • Joseph Binder - Graphic Design
  •  English fabrics and wallpapers around 1900 (Arts and Crafts Movement)

Since May 2017, the MAK with its collection highlights can also be visited virtually on Google Arts & Culture[14][15]: Gigapixel images of Gustav Klimt’s work drawings for the execution of a frieze in the dining room of the Stoclet Palace in Brussels (1910-1911) can be seen as well as parts of the heroic epic Hamzanama, which is one of the major works of painting in the Islamic world.

Awards[edit]

  • 1996: "Museum of the Year Award" from the Council of Europe, Strasbourg

Exhibitions[edit]

  • 2010: Firing Cells. About Having A Moment - curated by Gregor Eichinger [16]
  • 2010: Otto Neurath. Gypsy Urbanism [17]
  • 2010: Josef Dabernig. Excursus on Fitness [18]
  • 2010: Artists in focus: #8 Hans Weigand. Vortex [19]
  • 2010: Fat / Sam Jacob. Duplicate Array: Buildings / Places / Objects [20]
  • 2010: Ming. Interlude [21]
  • 2010: Ina Seidl. Jewelry [22]
  • 2010: Flowers for Kim Il Sung. Art and Architecture from the Democratic People's Republic of Korea [23]
  • 2010: Minimal. Art and Furniture from the MAK Collection [24]
  • 2010: Apokalypse / Keinen Keks heute. Otto Mühl [25]
  • 2010: Project Vienna. How to React to a City [26]
  • 2010: Josef Dabernig. 1 sculpture 2 versions [27]
  • 2010: Artists in focus #9 Plamen Dejanoff. Heads & Tails [28]
  • 2010: Design Criminals. Or a New Joy into the World curated by Sam Jacob [29]
  • 2010: Mihály Biró. Pathos in Red [30]
  • 2010: David Zink Yi. Manganese Make My Colors Blue [31]
  • 2010: Crossover. Two Collections - Private and Public [32]
  • 2010: Leather, Fabric and Zipper. Bags and Purses from the MAK Collection [33]
  • 2010: Contemporary. Jewelry from Austria. The ”Eligius” Austrian Jewelry Design Award, 2010 [34]
  • 2010: 100 Best Posters 09. Germany Austria Switzerland [35]
  • 2010: Andrea Branzi. The Weak Metropolis: for a ”New Charter of Athens” [36]
  • 2010: Eva Schlegel. In Between [37]
  • 2011: Bruno. Bruno Kreisky as portrayed by Konrad Rufus Müller [38]
  • 2011: The Great Viennese Café: A Laboratory. Phase I [39]
  • 2011: APPLY! Taste Art [40]
  • 2011: Artists in focus #10 Erwin Wurm. Schöner Wohnen [41]
  • 2011: SPAN (Matias del Campo & Sandra Manninger). Formations [42]
  • 2011: Kurt Ryslavy. Collector, Wine Merchant, Sunday Painter. A Conceptual-Sculptural Intervention [43]
  • 2011: The Emperor’s New Colors. 19th-Century Chinese Art from the MAK Collection [44]
  • 2011: The Second Skin. Objects for Packing and Preserving [45]
  • 2011: Industrial Furniture. Prototypes of the Modern Era [46]
  • 2011: Rudolf Steiner - Alchemy of the Everyday [47]
  • 2011: Artists in focus #11 Walter Pichler. Sculptures Models Drawings [48]
  • 2011: Michael Wallraff. looking up.vertical public space [49]
  • 2011: The Great Viennese Café: A Laboratory. Phase II & Experimental Design [50]
  • 2011: Artists’ Books on Tour. Artist Competition and Mobile Museum [51]
  • 2011: Gôm Sú‘. Ceramics from Viêt Nam, a 2000-Year History [52]
  • 2011: 2 x 100 Best Posters at the MAK [53]
  • 2011: Envisioning Buildings: Reflecting Architecture in Contemporary Art Photography [54]
  • 2012: Patrick Rampelotto. Adventures in Foam [55]
  • 2012: The Magic of Diversity. The MAK as Applied Space of the Future [56]
  • 2012: Gustav Klimt. Cartoons for the Mosaic Frieze at Stoclet House [57]
  • 2012: sound:frame festival 2012. Exhibition "substructions" [58]
  • 2012: ...Furniture of All Kinds. Design drawings from the Danhauser Furniture Factory [59]
  • 2012: Stiefel & Company Architects. Faux Terrains [60]
  • 2012: Made 4 You. Design for Change [61]
  • 2012: Things. plain & simple [62]
  • 2012: Kurt Spurey. Sedimente. Chawan. 4 Colors 4 Forms [63]
  • 2012: Benjamin Hirte. the classic mob ballet [64]
  • 2012: taliaYsebastian. The Committee of Sleep [65]
  • 2012: Masterpieces [66]
  • 2012: Contemporary Necklaces [67]
  • 2012: Others curated by Pae White [68]
  • 2012: Vienna 1900. Viennese Arts and Crafts, 1890–1938 [69]
  • 2012: 100 Best Posters 11. Germany Austria Switzerland [70]
  • 2012: WerkStadt Vienna. Design Engaging the City [71]
  • 2012: Kathi Hofer. craftivism [72]
  • 2013: Nippon Chinbotsu. Japan Sinks. A Manga [73]
  • 2013: Signs Taken in Wonder. Searching for Contemporary Istanbul [74]
  • 2013: Marco Dessí. Still Life [75]
  • 2013: A Shot of Rhythm and Color. English Textile Design of the late 19th Century [76]
  • 2013: JEX – Jewelry Exhibition. Jewelry by Petra Zimmermann [77]
  • 2013: Loos. Our Contemporary [78]
  • 2013: Kerstin von Gabain. City of Broken Furniture [79]
  • 2013: Verena Dengler. [80]
  • 2013: Lisa Truttmann. My Stage is your Domain [81]
  • 2013: Sonic Fabric feat. BLESS N°45 Soundperfume engineered by Popkalab [82]
  • 2013: 100 Best Posters 12. Germany Austria Switzerland [83]
  • 2013: Pae White. Orllegro [84]
  • 2013: Scientific Skin feat. Bare Conductive in collaboration with Fabio Antinori + Alicja Pytlewska [85]
  • 2013: Franz von Zülow. Paper [86]
  • 2014: sound:frame 2014. If this is the Answer, what is the Question? [87]
  • 2014: soma architecture. Immanent Elasticity [88]
  • 2014: After-Images.150 Years of the MAK – Exhibitions in Pictures [89]
  • 2014: Exemplary.150 Years of the MAK – from Arts and Crafts to Design [90]
  • 2014: Hollein. [91]
  • 2014: Hanna Krüger [Die Sammlung] a collective structure [92]
  • 2014: South meets North: Local Innovation. Global Conversation [93]
  • 2014: Tomorrow is... [94]
  • 2014: Valentin Ruhry. Grand Central [95]
  • 2014: 100 Beste Posters 13. Germany Austria Switzerland. [96]
  • 2014: Schwadron Brothers: new places und traces [97]
  • 2014: I Santillana. [98]
  • 2014: photo::vienna. Retrospective 2014 [99]
  • 2014: Ways to Modernism. Josef Hoffmann, Adolf Loos, and Their Impact [100]
  • 2015: Jewellery 1970-2015. Bollmann Collection. Fritz Maierhofer – Retrospective [101]
  • 2015: Eoos. Design between Archaic and High Tech [102]
  • 2015: Alfredo Barsuglia. Cabinet [103]
  • 2015: Amie Siegel. Provenance [104]
  • 2015: Future Light. Escaping Transparency [105]
  • 2015: Uneven Growth. Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities [106]
  • 2015: 2051. Smart Life in the City [107]
  • 2015: The Art of Working – Agency in Digital Modernity [108]
  • 2015: Mapping Bucharest. Art, Memory, and Revolution 1916–2016 [109]
  • 2015: 24/7. the human condition [110]
  • 2015: Christoph Niemann. Drawing the Line [111]
  • 2015: photo::vienna. Retrospective 2015 [112]
  • 2015: Villa Tugendhat [113]
  • 2015: Stefan Sagmeister: The Happy Show [114]
  • 2015: 100 Best Posters 14. Germany Austria Switzerland [115]
  • 2015: Josef Frank. Against Design. [116]
  • 2016: Fashion Utopias. Haute Couture in the Graphic Arts [117]
  • 2016: Kay Walkowiak. Forms in Time. [118]
  • 2016: Josiah McElehny. The Ornament Museum [119]
  • 2016: Robert La Roche. Personal View [120]
  • 2016: Friedrich Kiesler. Life Visions [121]
  • 2016: Eligius Award 2016. Jewelry in Austria [122]
  • 2016: 100 Beste Posters 15. Germany Austria Switzerland [123]
  • 2016: City Factory. Social Furniture Collection by Eoos [124]
  • 2016: photo::vienna. Retrospective 2016 [125]
  • 2016: Shunga. Erotic Art from Japan [126]
  • 2016: Patrycja Domanska. Stimuli [127]
  • 2016: The Goldscheider Company. Viennese Ceramics 1885–1938 [128]
  • 2016: handiCRAFT. Traditional Skills in the Digital Age [129]
  • 2017: The Glass of the Architects. Vienna 1900–1937 [130]
  • 2017: Glasses from the Empire and Biedermeier Period [131]
  • 2017: Book Covers of the Wiener Werkstätte [132]
  • 2017: 650 Years of Gold- and Silversmiths. The Competitions [133]
  • 2017: Library for Social Design [134]
  • 2017: Hello, Robot. Design between Human and Machine. An exhibition of the MAK, the Vitra Design Museum, and the Design Museum Gent [135]
  • 2017: CityFactory: New Work. New Design [136]
  • 2017: What Do We Want? Dimensions of a New Digital Humanism [137]
  • 2017: LeveL. the fragile balance of utopia [138]
  • 2017: ich weiß nicht. Growing Relations between Things. [139]
  • 2017: Artificial Tears. Singularity & Humanness—A Speculation [140]
  • 2017: Design for Agency. [141]
  • 2017: photo::vienna. Retrospective 2017 [142]
  • 2017: 100 Best Posters 16. Germany Austria Switzerland [143]
  • 2017: Thomas Bayrle. If It’s Too Long—Make It Longer [144]
  • 2017: Aesthetics of Change:150 Years of the University of Applied Arts Vienna [145]
  • 2018: Klimt's Magic Garden. A Virtual Reality Experience by Frederick Baker [146]
  • 2018: Gustav Peichl. 15 Buildings for His 90th [147]

MAK Branches[edit]

The MAK Branches[148] cover several continents and countries:

  • Vienna: MAK Branch Geymüllerschlössel MAK Tower Contemporary Art Depot at the Arenbergpark (currently closed) MAK Art in Public Space
  • USA: MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Los Angeles (Rudolph Schindler House, Pearl M. Mackey Apartment House, Fitzpatrick-Leland House).

Nearby buildings[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MAK Vienna - MAK Museum Vienna". mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  2. ^ "MAK Branch Geymüllerschlössel - MAK Museum Vienna". mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  3. ^ "MAK Tower - MAK Museum Vienna". mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  4. ^ "Josef Hoffmann Museum - MAK Museum Vienna". mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  5. ^ "MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Los Angeles - MAK Museum Vienna". mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  6. ^ "James Turrell – MAKlite - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  7. ^ "Michael Kienzer – Stylit - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  8. ^ "Franz West – 4 Larvae (Lemur Heads) - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  9. ^ "Donald Judd – Stage Set - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  10. ^ "Philip Johnson – Wiener Trio - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
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  12. ^ "MAK DESIGN LAB". mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  13. ^ "HELMUT LANG ARCHIVE". mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  14. ^ "MAK on Google Arts & Culture - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
  15. ^ "MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art - Google Arts & Culture". Google Cultural Institute. Retrieved 2018-04-12. 
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  18. ^ "JOSEF DABERNIG - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
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  30. ^ "MIHÁLY BIRÓ - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  31. ^ "DAVID ZINK YI - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
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  45. ^ "THE SECOND SKIN - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  46. ^ "INDUSTRIAL FURNITURE - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  47. ^ "RUDOLF STEINER - Alchemy of the Everyday - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  48. ^ "ARTISTS IN FOCUS #11 WALTER PICHLER - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  49. ^ "MICHAEL WALLRAFF - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  50. ^ "THE GREAT VIENNESE CAFÉ: A LABORATORY - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  51. ^ "ARTISTS' BOOKS ON TOUR - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  52. ^ "GÔM SÚ’ - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  53. ^ "2 x 100 Best Posters at the MAK - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  54. ^ "ENVISIONING BUILDINGS - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  55. ^ "PATRICK RAMPELOTTO - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  56. ^ "THE MAGIC OF DIVERSITY - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  57. ^ "GUSTAV KLIMT: Expectation and Fulfillment - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  58. ^ "sound:frame festival 2012 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  59. ^ "... FURNITURE OF ALL KINDS: - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  60. ^ "STIEFEL & COMPANY ARCHITECTS - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  61. ^ "MADE 4 YOU - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  62. ^ "THINGS. - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  63. ^ "KURT SPUREY. SEDIMENTS - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  64. ^ "Benjamin Hirte - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  65. ^ "TALIAySEBASTIAN - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  66. ^ "Masterpieces - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  67. ^ "Contemporary Necklaces - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  68. ^ "Others - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  69. ^ "Vienna 1900 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  70. ^ "100 Best Posters 11 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  71. ^ "WerkStadt Vienna - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  72. ^ "KATHI HOFER - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  73. ^ "Nippon Chinbotsu - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  74. ^ "Signs Taken in Wonder - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  75. ^ "Marco Dessí - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  76. ^ "A Shot of Rhythm and Color - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  77. ^ "J E X - Jewelry Exhibition - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  78. ^ "LOOS - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  79. ^ "Kerstin von Gabain - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  80. ^ "Verena Dengler - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  81. ^ "LISA TRUTTMANN - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  82. ^ "SONIC FABRIC - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  83. ^ "100 Best Posters 12 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  84. ^ "Pae White - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  85. ^ "SCIENTIFIC SKIN feat. Bare Conductive - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  86. ^ "FRANZ VON ZÜLOW - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  87. ^ "sound:frame 2014 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  88. ^ "soma architecture - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  89. ^ "AFTER-IMAGES: - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  90. ^ "EXEMPLARY - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  91. ^ "HOLLEIN - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  92. ^ "HANNA KRÜGER. [Die Sammlung] - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  93. ^ "South meets North: Local Innovation. Global Conversation - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  94. ^ "TOMORROW IS... - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  95. ^ "Valentin Ruhry - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  96. ^ "100 Best Posters 13 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  97. ^ "Schwadron Brothers: - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  98. ^ "I SANTILLANA - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  99. ^ "photo::vienna - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  100. ^ "Ways to Modernism - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  101. ^ "JEWELLERY 1970–2015 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  102. ^ "EOOS - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  103. ^ "Alfredo Barsuglia - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  104. ^ "AMIE SIEGEL - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  105. ^ "Future Light - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  106. ^ "Uneven Growth - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  107. ^ "2051 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  108. ^ "The Art of Working - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  109. ^ "Mapping Bucharest - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  110. ^ "24/7 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  111. ^ "CHRISTOPH NIEMANN: - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  112. ^ "photo::vienna - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  113. ^ "Villa Tugendhat - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  114. ^ "STEFAN SAGMEISTER: - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  115. ^ "100 Best Posters 14 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  116. ^ "JOSEF FRANK - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  117. ^ "FASHION UTOPIAS - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  118. ^ "Kay Walkowiak. Forms in Time - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  119. ^ "JOSIAH MCELHENY - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  120. ^ "ROBERT LA ROCHE - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  121. ^ "FREDERICK KIESLER: Life Visions - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  122. ^ "ELIGIUS AWARD 2016 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  123. ^ "100 BEST POSTERS 15 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  124. ^ "Social Furniture Collection by EOOS - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  125. ^ "photo::vienna - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  126. ^ "SHUNGA - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  127. ^ "Patrycja Domanska. STIMULI - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  128. ^ "THE GOLDSCHEIDER COMPANY: - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  129. ^ "handiCRAFT: - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  130. ^ "THE GLASS OF THE ARCHITECTS: Vienna 1900–1937 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  131. ^ "GLASSES FROM THE EMPIRE AND BIEDERMEIER PERIOD - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  132. ^ "BOOK COVERS OF THE WIENER WERKSTÄTTE - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  133. ^ "650 YEARS OF GOLD- AND SILVERSMITHS - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  134. ^ "discussion of thematically relevant books - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  135. ^ "Design between Human and Machine - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  136. ^ "CityFactory: New Work. New Design. - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  137. ^ "Dimensions of a New Digital Humanism - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  138. ^ "the fragile balance of utopia - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  139. ^ "Growing Relations between Things - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  140. ^ "Singularity & Humanness—A Speculation - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  141. ^ "DESIGN FOR AGENCY - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  142. ^ "DESIGN FOR AGENCY - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  143. ^ "100 BEST POSTERS 16 - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  144. ^ "THOMAS BAYRLE - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  145. ^ "AESTHETICS OF CHANGE - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  146. ^ "KLIMT'S MAGIC GARDEN: - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  147. ^ "GUSTAV PEICHL: - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-16. 
  148. ^ "SITES - MAK Museum Vienna". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2018-04-17. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 48°12′27″N 16°22′54″E / 48.20750°N 16.38167°E / 48.20750; 16.38167