My Immortal

This is a good article. Click here for more information.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"My Immortal"
Evanescence - My Immortal (Official Single Cover).png
Single by Evanescence
from the album Fallen and Daredevil: The Album
ReleasedDecember 8, 2003 (2003-12-08)
Recorded2000 (Origin version)
2002 (band version)
StudioNRG Recording (North Hollywood, California)
Genre
Length4:40
LabelWind-up
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
Evanescence singles chronology
"Going Under"
(2003)
"My Immortal"
(2003)
"Everybody's Fool"
(2004)
Music video
"My Immortal" on YouTube

"My Immortal" is a song by American rock band Evanescence from their debut studio album, Fallen (2003). It was released by Wind-up Records on December 8, 2003, as the third single from the album. An alternative version appears on the band's fourth studio album Synthesis (2017). The song was written by guitarist Ben Moody and singer and pianist Amy Lee when they were 16 and 15, respectively. Various versions of "My Immortal" were recorded, with the earliest in 1997. The version recorded for Evanescence's demo CD Origin (2000) was used on Fallen by the label against Lee's wishes, featuring Lee's demo vocals, a MIDI keyboard, and strings added during the production of Fallen. The song was re-recorded for its single release, dubbed the "band version", featuring a full band's performance on the bridge and final chorus along with a new string arrangement by David Campbell.

"My Immortal" is a piano power ballad, with fictional lyrics about a lingering spirit that haunts someone. The song received generally positive reviews. In 2005, it received a nomination for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals at the 47th Grammy Awards. The song was also commercially successful, peaking within the top ten in over 10 countries. It charted at number seven on the US Billboard Hot 100 and topped the charts in Canada, Greece and Portugal, as well as on the Billboard Adult Pop Songs chart. The single was certified gold in the United States and platinum in Australia. An accompanying music video directed by David Mould was filmed in black-and-white in Gothic Quarter, Barcelona. The video was nominated for the MTV Video Music Award for Best Rock Video.

Background and recording[edit]

The earliest known demo of "My Immortal" was recorded in 1997, which solely featured Lee's vocals and piano and slightly different lyrics. The song was intended to be included on the band's self-titled EP but was cut before it was released.[1] In 2000, the song was re-recorded for the band's demo album, Origin, which contains a rearranged piano melody and lyrics, including the bridge added by Lee.[2] A version of the song is also featured on the band's 2003 EP, Mystary.[3]

The bandmembers had recorded a demo of "My Immortal" at the radio station where Lee's father worked after it was empty late at night; this recording, comprising a MIDI keyboard and Lee's demo vocal performance as a teen, is the version used on Fallen per the label's demand, to Lee's displeasure.[7] Lee stated:

"It's really hard for me to listen to the album version because we did it two years ago — it was just me and guitarist Ben [Moody], and I've grown so much as a performer since then ... It's not even a real piano. And the sound quality is bad because we had to break into the studio to record it late at night when no one was around because we couldn't afford a real session."[5]

Lee later said she also dislikes it because she "sounds like a little kid" and the album version does not use David Campbell's orchestration.[6] Moody is credited on the album with producing the song,[8] while on the single's CD Dave Fortman and Moody are credited with production on both the album version and band version of the song.[9] The added strings on the album version were arranged by Graeme Revell for the Daredevil soundtrack.[11]

When "My Immortal" became a single, Lee and Moody chose the recording they had made for Fallen that the label had originally rejected.[5] This single recording is the "band version", featuring a full band performance after the bridge and during the final chorus of the song, as well as Campbell's orchestration. It is the version used on the song's music video and for radio.[14] The later pressings of Fallen contain the single version (or "band version") of "My Immortal" as a hidden track.[12]

Composition[edit]

"My Immortal"'s words were originally written by Moody from fiction and the song's composition was made by Moody and Lee. Moody and Lee wrote the song when they were 16 and 15, respectively,[18] and the bridge was later added by Lee.[2] The fictional lyrics of the song refer to a spirit that haunts the memory of a grieving loved one, according to MTV.[5] Lee considers it "Ben [Moody]'s song".[19] She said he writes from the point of view of a "storyteller", while she writes from her own feelings and experiences.[5]

"My Immortal" is a piano power ballad.[20][21][22] John Bean of The Providence Journal called it a "gothic ballad".[23] Michael Clark of the Houston Chronicle viewed it as "goth-meets-pop",[24] and MTV described it as a "delicate, heartfelt ballad".[25] A writer for IGN said "My Immortal" is thematically a song of pain and despair".[26] Lee's vocals are accompanied by a simple piano and some "symphonic dressings".[22] According to the sheet music published by Alfred Music Publishing on the website Musicnotes.com, the song is set in common time and performed in slow and free tempo of 80 beats per minute. Lee's vocal range for the song runs from the low musical note of A3 to the high note of C5.[27]

Critical reception[edit]

"My Immortal" received generally positive reviews. Kirk Miller of Rolling Stone said that the song "lets Lee wail about her personal demons over simple piano and some symphonic dressings".[22] Richard Harrington of The Washington Post called it a "majestic" song.[28] Blair R. Fischer from MTV News described "My Immortal" as a "delicate, heartfelt ballad".[25] Reviewing a live show, IGN's Ed Thompson regarded it "one of the first and best songs Evanescence ever wrote".[29] Blair R. Fischer of Chicago Tribune said that Lee sounds "simply heavenly on the aberrant, elegant strings-soaked ballad".[30] Jordan Reimer of The Daily Princetonian found a "haunting beauty" in the song.[31] Writing for The Guardian, Tom Reynolds deemed "My Immortal" a "whimpering post-breakup tune" and "overwrought", listing it as one of his top 25 "miserable" tracks.[32]

In 2005, the song received a Grammy Award nomination for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.[33][34] "My Immortal" has been considered by some media outlets as one of Evanescence's best songs, with Loudwire and Kerrang ranking it in the top five of their lists of best Evanescence songs.[35][36]

Chart performance[edit]

The song peaked within the top 20 of more than 10 countries. On the chart issue dated April 10, 2004, "My Immortal" peaked at number seven on the Billboard Hot 100,[37] and peaked at number two on the Pop Songs chart on March 27, 2004.[38] It reached number 19 on the Adult Contemporary chart as well.[39] On February 17, 2009, "My Immortal" was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for selling more than 500,000 copies in the United States.[40] The song managed to top the charts of Canada, Greece and Billboard's Adult Pop Songs in the United States.[41][42][43] Its single release also helped Fallen move from number nine to number three on the Billboard 200 chart, selling another 69,000 copies.[44][45] On the Billboard Radio Songs chart, the song peaked at number seven on April 10, 2004.[46] Nielsen Broadcast Data Systems placed the song at number six on the list of most played radio songs in 2004 with 317,577 spins.[47]

On the Australian Singles Chart, "My Immortal" debuted at number four on January 25, 2004, which became its peak position.[48] For three more weeks, it stayed at that position. The next eight weeks, it remained in the top ten of the chart,[49] and it was last seen at number 44 for the week of June 13, 2004.[50] The single was certified platinum by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) for shipment of 70,000 copies in that country.[51] On New Zealand's RIANZ chart, the song debuted at number 49 on December 19, 2003. On January 25, it jumped 27 positions from number 34 to number 7. It fell to number eight the next week, then rose up to number two on February 8, blocked from the top position by Baby Bash's "Suga Suga".[52] The next week, it fell to number nine, then spent three more non-consecutive weeks in the top ten. May 10 was its last week inside the top 50, appearing at number 32.[53]

On December 14, 2003, "My Immortal" debuted at number seven on the UK Singles Chart which later also became its peak position.[54] On February 15, 2004 the song dropped out of the top 100. It later re-entered at number 84 on July 13, 2008.[55] After spending several weeks on different positions on the UK Rock Chart, on August 21, 2011, it peaked at number one.[56] The next week, "My Immortal" moved to number two after being replaced by the band's single "What You Want" (2011);[56] a week later it returned to number one on the chart.[56] The song re-entered the UK Singles Chart at number 81 on August 21, 2011 and at number 89 on October 16, 2011.[55] The song also charted on Ireland's IRMA chart, peaking at number 20 and staying in the chart for six weeks.[57]

Music video[edit]

The music video for "My Immortal" was filmed in Barri Gòtic, Barcelona.

A music video directed by David Mould was filmed entirely in black-and-white in Plaça de Sant Felip Neri, Gothic Quarter, Barcelona.[5][58] Lee said they filmed it in an "old area of town", with some of footage from a "scenic point, and there was a rooftop where you could see Barcelona below."[5]

Lee said the video "is all about separation" and she wanted it "to depict real human sadness."[5][59] The video was filmed two weeks before Moody's departure from the band.[58] Lee admitted that the video's visuals were conspicuous in retrospect but the similarities between that and Moody's departure was coincidental.[60][59]

According to Jon Wiederhorn from MTV News, the shots of the video are "evocative and artistic, resembling a cross between a foreign film and a Chanel advertisement."[5] Joe D'Angelo of MTV News said that Lee's disconnection in the video shows a "distressed and emotionally wrought heroine."[61] Rob Sheffield of Rolling Stone praised the video saying that Lee looked like a "teen-misery titan" and that she "tiptoed through a marble castle of pain".[62] The music video received an MTV Video Music Award nomination for Best Rock Video at the 2004 MTV Video Music Awards.[63]

Live performances[edit]

Evanescence performed the song on the Late Show with David Letterman in March 2004,[64] and at the 2004 Billboard Music Awards in December 2004.[65] A live performance of the song from their Le Zénith, Paris show is featured on their concert CD/DVD, Anywhere but Home (2004).[66][67] Evanescence performed the song on their 2011 Rock in Rio festival show on October 2, 2011.[68]

Covers and usage in media[edit]

"My Immortal" was featured on the soundtrack of the film Daredevil (2003) along with "Bring Me to Life".[69][70] The song has been used in several television episodes. It is featured in the Smallville season three episode "Memoria". Lucy Walsh, a contestant of the show Rock the Cradle, covered the song during the fifth episode, "Judge's Picks".[71] Dancer Hampton Williams performed to this song during his audition for the season 9 premiere of So You Think You Can Dance,[72] and in season 11 the song accompanied a performance by the top seven women, choreographed by Mandy Moore and broadcast on July 30, 2014.

An arrangement of the song inspired by Gregorian chant was covered by the group Gregorian on their 2004 album, The Dark Side.[73] In 2012, Colombian singer Davis Bravo released a version translated in Spanish with Salsa arrangements called "Mi Eterno".[74] In 2013, violinist Lindsey Stirling recorded an instrumental version of "My Immortal" for the Target edition of her self-titled debut studio album.[75] The following year, Andrea Begley covered "My Immortal" for her debut studio album, The Message.[76] Teenage classical vocalist Jackie Evancho covered "My Immortal" in 2014 on her fifth full-length album, Awakening, as a bonus track for the Japanese album version.[77]

Personnel[edit]

Credits are adapted from the liner notes of Fallen.[8]

Track listings[edit]

Charts[edit]

Certifications[edit]

Certifications and sales for "My Immortal"
Region Certification Certified units/sales
Australia (ARIA)[51] Platinum 70,000^
Denmark (IFPI Danmark)[122] Gold 45,000double-dagger
Germany (BVMI)[123] Gold 150,000double-dagger
Italy (FIMI)[124] Platinum 50,000double-dagger
Norway (IFPI Norway)[125] Gold 5,000*
United Kingdom (BPI)[126] Platinum 600,000double-dagger
United States (RIAA)[40] Platinum 1,000,000double-dagger

* Sales figures based on certification alone.
^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.
double-dagger Sales+streaming figures based on certification alone.

Release history[edit]

Release dates and formats for "My Immortal"
Region Date Format(s) Label(s) Ref.
United States November 10, 2003 Wind-up [127]
United Kingdom December 8, 2003 CD
[128]
Australia January 12, 2004 [129]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Evanescence (EP album). Evanescence.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  2. ^ a b Origin (Demo album). Evanescence. Bigwig Enterprises.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  3. ^ Mystary (EP album). Evanescence. Wind-up Records.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  4. ^ a b Law, Sam (October 2017). "Symphonic Possession". Kerrang!. No. 1694. pp. 24–27.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Wiederhorn, Jon (November 5, 2003). "Are There Clues To Evanescence's Problems In Their New Video?". MTV. Archived from the original on October 31, 2022.
  6. ^ a b c "Evanescence's Amy Lee on 'My Immortal' (2018)" (Interview). Music Feeds. February 16, 2018. Archived from the original on November 13, 2022. Retrieved October 31, 2022.
  7. ^ [4][5][6]
  8. ^ a b c Fallen (album). Evanescence. Wind-up Records.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  9. ^ My Immortal (single). Evanescence. Wind-up Records. 2003.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  10. ^ Reeseman, Bryan (August 1, 2003). "In The Recording Studio With Evanescence: Recording Fallen". Mix. NewBay Media. Archived from the original on August 5, 2011. Retrieved July 22, 2011.
  11. ^ [8][10][6]
  12. ^ a b "My Immortal Band Version Free Download Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)". Evanescence.com. 2004. Archived from the original on January 24, 2009.
  13. ^ Titus, Christa (March 4, 2013). "Evanescence, 'Fallen': Classic Track-By-Track". Billboard. Archived from the original on June 5, 2016. Retrieved May 23, 2016.
  14. ^ [5][12][13][4]
  15. ^ Lee, Amy; Moody, Ben (February 24, 2003). "Interview with DC101 radio on February 24, 2003". Elliot in the Morning (Interview). Interviewed by Elliot Segal. Archived from the original (MP3 audio) on February 26, 2007 – via EvanescenceReference.info.
  16. ^ "Evanescence's Future Uncertain, Says Amy Lee: 'I Have a Lot More That I Want To Do With My Life'". Billboard. September 22, 2014. Archived from the original on October 14, 2022. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  17. ^ "Get Free: Amy Lee on Artistic Independence, the Future of Evanescence". Rolling Stone. August 11, 2014. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021.
  18. ^ [5][15][16][17]
  19. ^ Bottomley, C. (September 18, 2006). "Evanescence: Amy Lee Explains the New Songs". VH1. Viacom. Archived from the original on October 28, 2007. Retrieved November 26, 2007.
  20. ^ Claire, Colette. "Evanescence Album Review". The Gauntlet. Gauntlet Publication Society. Archived from the original on April 30, 2009. Retrieved July 22, 2011.
  21. ^ Thompson, Ed (October 3, 2006). "The Open Door (Evanescence) – Music Review". IGN. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved October 21, 2011.
  22. ^ a b c Miller, Kirk (March 25, 2003). "Fallen by Evanescence". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media. Archived from the original on January 8, 2012. Retrieved July 29, 2011.
  23. ^ Bream, Jon (April 2, 2007). "Evanescence's Amy Lee is 'feeling really, really good". The Providence Journal. Archived from the original on October 2, 2007. Retrieved November 5, 2022.
  24. ^ Clark, Michael D. (August 11, 2004). "Evanescence singer takes Christian band in new direction". Houston Chronicle. Hearst Corporation. Archived from the original on September 22, 2021. Retrieved July 23, 2011.
  25. ^ a b Fischer, Blair R (August 13, 2003). "Evanescence Make Understatement Of At Chicago Sweat Factory". MTV News. MTV Networks. Archived from the original on August 5, 2011. Retrieved July 22, 2011.
  26. ^ Coughlin, Greg (July 10, 2003). "Reader Review: Fallen". IGN. News Corporation. Archived from the original on November 30, 2006. Retrieved July 29, 2011.
  27. ^ Moody, Ben; Lee, Amy. "My Immortal – Evanescence Digital Sheet Music". Musicnotes.com. Alfred Music Publishing. MN0044842. Archived from the original on September 23, 2022.
  28. ^ Harrington, Richard (October 6, 2006). "Another 'Door' Opens for Amy Lee". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on November 12, 2012. Retrieved July 23, 2011.
  29. ^ Thompson, Ed (November 1, 2006). "Evanescence Steal The Hearts Of San Francisco". IGN. News Corporation. Archived from the original on October 4, 2009. Retrieved September 20, 2011.
  30. ^ "Evanescence: Fallen". Chicago Tribune. March 6, 2003. Archived from the original on November 5, 2022. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  31. ^ Reimer, Jordan (November 9, 2006). "Bare-boned Evanescence album lacks heart". The Daily Princetonian. Trustees of The Daily Princetonian Publishing Company. Archived from the original on June 6, 2012. Retrieved September 23, 2011.
  32. ^ Reynolds, Tom (June 10, 2005). "Sad songs say so much". The Guardian. Archived from the original on January 8, 2014. Retrieved September 19, 2011.
  33. ^ "And the Nominees Are..." The Washington Post. December 8, 2004. Archived from the original on December 15, 2019. Retrieved July 22, 2011.
  34. ^ "The complete list: Grammy Nominees". The New York Times. December 7, 2004. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved July 23, 2011.
  35. ^ Ouellette, Mary (December 13, 2011). "10 Best Evanescence Songs". Loudwire. Retrieved February 21, 2022.
  36. ^ Law, Sam (August 21, 2020). "The 20 Greatest Evanescence Songs – Ranked". Kerrang. Archived from the original on October 26, 2022. Retrieved February 21, 2022.
  37. ^ "Hot 100 (Week of April 10, 2004)". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on June 7, 2013. Retrieved October 18, 2011.
  38. ^ "Pop Songs (Week of March 27, 2004)". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on December 9, 2013. Retrieved October 18, 2011.
  39. ^ a b "Evanescence Chart History (Adult Contemporary)". Billboard. Retrieved July 20, 2011.
  40. ^ a b "American single certifications – Evanescence – My Immortal". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  41. ^ "Adult Pop Songs (Week of March 27, 2004)". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved October 18, 2011.
  42. ^ a b "Evanescence". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. 2004. Retrieved April 25, 2009.
  43. ^ a b "Ελληνικó Chart". International Federation of the Phonographic Industry Greece. Archived from the original on July 17, 2004.
  44. ^ "Another week at top of Billboard chart for OutKast". Music Week. Intent Media. January 29, 2004. Archived from the original on August 30, 2012. Retrieved July 24, 2011.
  45. ^ Susman, Gary (January 28, 2004). "The Way You Don't Move – Michael Jackson remembered". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. Archived from the original on October 21, 2012. Retrieved July 24, 2011.
  46. ^ "Radio Songs (Week of April 10, 2004)". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved October 18, 2011.
  47. ^ Vineyard, Jennifer (January 5, 2005). "Usher's 'Yeah!' Was Most Played Song Of 2004". MTV News. MTV Networks. Archived from the original on August 15, 2011. Retrieved September 20, 2011.
  48. ^ "Australian Singles Chart". ARIA Chart. Hung Medien. January 25, 2011. Retrieved October 18, 2011.
  49. ^ a b "Evanescence – My Immortal". ARIA Top 50 Singles. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  50. ^ "Australian Singles Chart". ARIA Charts. Hung Medien. June 13, 2004. Archived from the original on October 22, 2012. Retrieved October 18, 2011.
  51. ^ a b "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2004 Singles" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved September 20, 2015.
  52. ^ "Single Top 40 08/02/2004". Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  53. ^ "Single Top 50 10/05/2004". Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  54. ^ "Archive Chart (December 20, 2003)". Official Charts Company. Retrieved September 19, 2011.
  55. ^ a b c "Evanescence: Artist Chart History". Official Charts Company. Retrieved June 2, 2021.
  56. ^ a b c The song peaked at number one on the UK Rock Chart for three consecutive weeks in 2011:
  57. ^ "The Irish Charts - All there is to know". Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  58. ^ a b Wiederhorn, Jon (November 3, 2003). "Evanescence Co-Founder Ben Moody Leaves Band During Tour". MTV News. MTV Networks. Archived from the original on November 7, 2012. Retrieved July 20, 2011.
  59. ^ a b Baker, T (2003). "Evanescence: The Leaving Song". Rock Sound. p. 28.
  60. ^ Wiederhorn, John; reporting by Cornell, Jeff (October 23, 2003). "Evanescence Soldier On Without Ben Moody, Look Forward To Recording". MTV News. MTV Networks. Archived from the original on July 12, 2012. Retrieved October 24, 2011.
  61. ^ D'Angelo, Joe. "Evanescence: The Split". MTV. MTV Networks. p. 3. Archived from the original on May 1, 2011. Retrieved September 6, 2011.
  62. ^ Sheffield, Rob (October 5, 2006). "The Open Door – Album Review". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media. Archived from the original on October 10, 2011. Retrieved September 19, 2011.
  63. ^ "Jay-Z Tops 2004 MTV VMA Nominations". Billboard. July 27, 2004. Archived from the original on May 26, 2022. Retrieved November 13, 2022.
  64. ^ Eliscu, Jenny (March 10, 2004). "Q&A: Amy Lee". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media. Retrieved September 19, 2011.
  65. ^ "Usher Nabs 11 Billboard Music Awards". Billboard. The Prometheus Global Media. December 9, 2004. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved July 27, 2011.
  66. ^ Deming, Mark (2012). "Evanescence: Anywhere but Home". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved July 29, 2011.
  67. ^ Loftus, Johnny. "Anywhere But Home Review". AllMusic. Archived from the original on October 24, 2022. Retrieved September 14, 2011.
  68. ^ Ribeiro, Guilherme (October 2, 2011). "Evanescence toca o bom básico no Rock in Rio" (in Portuguese). MTV Brasil. MTV Networks. Archived from the original on April 1, 2012. Retrieved October 4, 2011.
  69. ^ Tim, Sendra. "Daredevil: The Album Review". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Archived from the original on November 16, 2021. Retrieved September 19, 2011.
  70. ^ "Soundtracks". Billboard. Vol. 115, no. 7. February 15, 2003. p. 12. Retrieved November 5, 2022.
  71. ^ "Rock The Cradle " Ep. 105". MTV. MTV Networks. Archived from the original on November 8, 2012. Retrieved September 20, 2011.
  72. ^ Fulghum, Sherrill (May 24, 2012). "So You Think You Can Dance: Season Nine Premiere". Allvoices. Archived from the original on May 27, 2012. Retrieved November 29, 2012.
  73. ^ "The Dark Side - Gregorian". AllMusic. Archived from the original on September 28, 2016. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  74. ^ "Davis Bravo - Mi Eterno (Video Oficial) | Salsa Romántica - YouTube". www.youtube.com. Retrieved 2020-12-27.
  75. ^ "Lindsey Stirling - Lindsey Stirling - Only at Target". Target Corporation. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  76. ^ Copsey, Robert (October 21, 2013). "Andrea Begley: 'The Message' - Album review". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on October 22, 2013. Retrieved October 23, 2013.
  77. ^ "Awakening [Blu-spec CD2]". CDJapan.co.jp. Retrieved October 19, 2014.
  78. ^ a b c d "Evanescence – My Immortal". Singles Top 100. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  79. ^ "My Immortal: Evanescence" (in German). Amazon.de. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  80. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  81. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  82. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal" (in French). Ultratop 50. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  83. ^ "Oficiální Česká Hitparáda - Pro týden 25/2004" (in Czech). IFPI ČR. Archived from the original on June 18, 2004. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  84. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal". Tracklisten. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  85. ^ "Hits of the World – Eurocharts" (PDF). Billboard. Vol. 116, no. 5. January 31, 2004. p. 43. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  86. ^ "Evanescence: My Immortal" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  87. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal" (in French). Les classement single. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  88. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal" (in German). GfK Entertainment charts. Retrieved May 19, 2018.
  89. ^ "Archívum – Slágerlisták – MAHASZ" (in Hungarian). Single (track) Top 40 lista. Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége. Retrieved January 25, 2021.
  90. ^ "The Irish Charts – Search Results – My Immortal". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved January 24, 2020.
  91. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal". Top Digital Download. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  92. ^ "Nederlandse Top 40 – week 3, 2004" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40. Retrieved May 19, 2018.
  93. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal" (in Dutch). Single Top 100. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  94. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  95. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal". VG-lista. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  96. ^ "Polish Airplay Charts - Lista krajowa 08/2004". PiF PaF Production. Archived from the original on October 25, 2007. Retrieved November 26, 2016.
  97. ^ "Hits of the World – Portugal" (PDF). Billboard. Vol. 116, no. 7. February 14, 2004. p. 53. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  98. ^ Romanian Top 100: Editia 10, saptamina 8.03 - 14.03, 2004
  99. ^ "Official Scottish Singles Sales Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved May 19, 2018.
  100. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal" Canciones Top 50. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  101. ^ "Evanescence – My Immortal". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  102. ^ "Official Rock & Metal Singles Chart Top 40". Official Charts Company. Retrieved May 19, 2018.
  103. ^ "Evanescence Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved July 20, 2011.
  104. ^ "Evanescence Chart History (Adult Pop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved July 20, 2011.
  105. ^ "Evanescence Chart History (Pop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved July 20, 2011.
  106. ^ "UK Year-End Chart 2003" (PDF). Official Charts Company. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved April 11, 2011.
  107. ^ "ARIA Top 100 Singles for 2004". ARIA. Retrieved May 20, 2018.
  108. ^ "Austria Top 75 Singles of 2004". Ö3 Austria Top 40. Hung Medien. Archived from the original on September 3, 2011. Retrieved September 1, 2011.
  109. ^ "Jaaroverzichten 2004 (Flanders)" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Hung Medien. Archived from the original on September 14, 2010. Retrieved August 20, 2011.
  110. ^ "Rapports Annuels 2004 (Flanders)" (in French). Ultratop 50. Hung Medien. Archived from the original on December 31, 2010. Retrieved August 20, 2011.
  111. ^ "Top 100 Single–Jahrescharts 2004" (in German). GfK Entertainment. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  112. ^ "Mix e singoli" (PDF) (in Italian). FIMI. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 10, 2006. Retrieved December 17, 2020.
  113. ^ "Dutch Top 40 Year End Chart – 2004". MegaCharts. Retrieved August 21, 2011.
  114. ^ "Jaaroverzichten – Single 2004". MegaCharts. Hung Medien. Archived from the original on September 18, 2015. Retrieved September 20, 2011.
  115. ^ "Annual Top 50 Singles Chart 2003". Recording Industry Association of New Zealand. Archived from the original on April 6, 2012. Retrieved August 20, 2011.
  116. ^ "Årslista Singlar – År 2004" (in Swedish). Sverigetopplistan. Archived from the original on June 20, 2015. Retrieved October 6, 2011.
  117. ^ "Swiss Year End Charts 2004". Swiss Music Charts. Hung Medien. Archived from the original on February 7, 2005. Retrieved August 15, 2011.
  118. ^ "The Billboard Hot 100 Singles & Tracks – 2004 Year End Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. December 27, 2003. Archived from the original on October 1, 2012. Retrieved February 16, 2011.
  119. ^ "The Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Singles & Tracks – 2004 Year End Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. December 25, 2004. Archived from the original on October 9, 2012. Retrieved August 20, 2011.
  120. ^ "The Billboard Hot Adult Top 40 Singles & Tracks – 2004 Year End Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. December 25, 2004. Archived from the original on October 9, 2012. Retrieved August 20, 2011.
  121. ^ "The Billboard Pop Adult Songs – Decade Year End Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on October 9, 2012. Retrieved August 15, 2011.
  122. ^ "Danish single certifications – Evanescence – My Immortal". IFPI Danmark. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  123. ^ "Gold-/Platin-Datenbank (Evanescence; 'My Immortal')" (in German). Bundesverband Musikindustrie. Retrieved May 4, 2018.
  124. ^ "Italian single certifications – Evanescence – My Immortal" (in Italian). Federazione Industria Musicale Italiana. Retrieved January 21, 2019. Select "2019" in the "Anno" drop-down menu. Select "My Immortal" in the "Filtra" field. Select "Singoli" under "Sezione".
  125. ^ "IFPI Norsk platebransje Trofeer 1993–2011" (in Norwegian). IFPI Norway. Retrieved February 22, 2019.
  126. ^ "British single certifications – Evanescence – My Immortal". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved November 13, 2020.
  127. ^ "Going for Adds". Radio & Records. No. 1529. November 7, 2003. p. 23.
  128. ^ "New Releases: Singles". Music Week. December 6, 2003. p. 27.
  129. ^ "The ARIA Report: New Releases Singles – Week Commencing 12th January 2004" (PDF). ARIA. January 12, 2004. p. 24. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 22, 2008. Retrieved January 26, 2022.