Myeolchi-jeot

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Myeolchi-jeot
Myeolchijeot (fermented anchovies).jpg
Alternative names Meljeot, salted anchovies
Type Jeotgal
Place of origin Korea
Main ingredients Anchovies
Cookbook: Myeolchi-jeot  Media: Myeolchi-jeot
Korean name
Hangul 멸치젓
Hanja n/a
Revised Romanization myeolchi-jeot
McCune–Reischauer myŏlch'i-chŏt
IPA [mjʌl.tɕʰi.dʑʌt̚]

Myeolchi-jeot (멸치젓) or salted anchovies is a variety of jeotgal (salted seafood), made by salting and fermenting anchovies.[1] Along with saeu-jeot (salted shrimps), it is one of the most commonly consumed jeotgal in Korean cuisine. In mainland Korea, myeolchi-jeot is used mostly for making kimchi,[2] while in Jeju Island, meljeot (멜젓; myeolchi-jeot in Jeju language) is also used as a dipping sauce.[3] Chuja Islands, located between South Jeolla and Jeju, are famous for producing the highest quality myeolchi-jeot.[4]

Names and etymology[edit]

Myeolchi-jeot (멸치젓) is a compound of myeolchi (멸치), the Korean word for anchovy (Engraulis japonicus), and jeot (), the word meaning salted fermented seafood.[5][6][7] Meljeot (멜젓) is also a compound, consisting of mel (), the Jeju name for anchovy, and jeot.[8] The Jeju word mel is cognate with the first syllable myeol of the Korean word myeolchi, whose second syllable -chi is a suffix attached to fish names.[9] Similar forms to meljeot also occur in mainland Korean dialects, including metjeot (멧젓) and mitjeot (밋젓) in Gyeongsang dialect.[10][11]

Preparation[edit]

Anchovies are harvested along the southern coasts of Korean Peninsula in masses. Myeolchi-jeot for gimjang (making kimchi for winter) is prepared with mature anchovies harvested in July and August, known as osari-myeolchi (flood tide anchovies). In Jeju Island, bigger anchovies harvested in spring in the coasts of Seogwipo are made into meljeot.

Cleaned fresh anchovies are drained on sokuri (bamboo basket), and salted with coarse salt weighing 15‒20% of the anchovies.[12] In an onggi (eartenware jar), the anchovies and salt are put in layers, with the uppermost layer being a thick layer of salt, to prevent the anchovies from contacting air.[2] The jar is sealed, and the salted anchovies are then let ferment at 15–20 °C (59–68 °F) for two to three months in onggi (eartenware jar). When the myeolchi-jeot ages another couple of months, it becomes myeolchi-jeot-guk (anchovy extract).[12]

Culinary use[edit]

Meljeot (salted anchovies) as a dipping sauce for grilled ogyeopsal (pork belly)

The liquid extract, made after around six months of fermentation of myeolchi-jeot, is filtered and boiled to be used in kimchi.[12] Alternatively, two parts myeolchi-jeot can be mixed with one part water, boiled over high heat, filtered, let set, and the upper, clear layer is used in kimchi.[2] The boiled and filtered myeolchi-jeot liquid may also used to flavor seaweed dishes.[13] Myeolchi-jeot made with boned anchovies are seasoned and eaten as banchan (side dish).[13]

In Geomun Island, where it is difficult to grow soybeans, the remaining solids and cloudy lower layer of liquid after extracting the clear, upper liquid (anchovy extract) from myeolchi-jeot is used to make myeoljang (anchovy paste).[13]

In Jeju Island, meljeot is used as dipping sauce for grilled pork. In summer, meljeot is used in blanched soybean leaf ssam (wrap), and in winter, it is napa cabbage leaves are dipped in meljeot.[3] Meljeot may also be eaten as banchan (side dish), either as it is or seasoned with garlic and chili peppers.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Institute of Korean Language (30 July 2014). "주요 한식명(200개) 로마자 표기 및 번역(영, 중, 일) 표준안" (PDF) (in Korean). Retrieved 22 February 2017. Lay summaryNational Institute of Korean Language. 
  2. ^ a b c "Myeolchi-jeot" 멸치젓. Doopedia (in Korean). Doosan Corporation. Retrieved 24 June 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c "Meljeot" 멜젓. Doopedia (in Korean). Doosan Corporation. Retrieved 24 June 2017. 
  4. ^ Cultural Properties Administration, MCPI (1984). Folkloric Studies Division, CHRI, ed. Hanguk minsok jonghap josa bogoseo 한국민속종합조사보고서 [A General Survey Report of Korean Folklore] (PDF) (in Korean). 15. Seoul: Korea Herald. p. 197. ISBN 9788928503254. Retrieved 15 May 2008. 
  5. ^ "myeolchi-jeot" 멸치젓. Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 23 June 2017. 
  6. ^ "myeolchi" 멸치. Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 23 June 2017. 
  7. ^ "jeot" . Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 23 June 2017. 
  8. ^ "mel" . Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 23 June 2017. 
  9. ^ 홍, 윤표 (1 September 2006). "‘가물치’와 ‘붕어’의 어원". National Institute of Korean Language (in Korean). Retrieved 4 June 2017. 
  10. ^ "metjeot" 멧젓. Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 23 June 2017. 
  11. ^ "mitjeot" 밋젓. Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 23 June 2017. 
  12. ^ a b c "The Ingredients for Kimchi and Their Characteristics". Korea.net. Korean Overseas Information Service. Archived from the original on 28 March 2008. Retrieved 6 May 2008. 
  13. ^ a b c 서, 혜경. "Myeolchi-jeot" 멸치젓. Encyclopedia of Korean Culture (in Korean). Academy of Korean Studies. Retrieved 24 June 2017.