Mynydd Bodafon

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Yr Arwydd
Bodafon.jpg
Highest point
Elevation 584 ft (178 m)
Prominence 584 ft (178 m)
Parent peak none - HP Anglesey
Listing Marilyn
Naming
Translation the signal (Welsh)
Pronunciation Welsh: [ər ˈarwɪð]
Geography
Location Anglesey, Wales
OS grid SH472854
Topo map OS Landranger 114

Mynydd Bodafon is the highest point on the island of Anglesey (although not in the county of Anglesey — see Holyhead Mountain). Its summit is also known as Yr Arwydd ("the signal"). It lies about 2½ miles west of the coastal town of Moelfre and ⅔ of a mile south-west of the hamlet of Brynrefail. The meaning of Bodafon is obscure. Bod is a common placename element meaning 'dwelling' and afon here is possibly a corruption of the personal name A(e)ddan (afon is Welsh for 'river' but topography rules that out).[1]

The terrain of Mynydd Bodafon varies greatly, from pine forest to heathland. In 2006 during an arson attack, much of this land was burnt. The walk to the top of Yr Arwydd is not a particularly difficult one and can be done by anyone with a reasonable level of fitness. There is a small lake which contains various varieties of fish, a reservoir and three springs coming from the hill. To the east of the hill is found an Iron Age earthwork.

Mynydd Bodafon's wildlife is typical for Anglesey. There are a growing number of rabbits which spread past the base of the hill. At one time, deer were present but were hunted and no longer exist there. Also due to hunting the number of foxes in the area has decreased. Mynydd Bodafon boasts a large number of wild birds. Various birds of prey include buzzards and a small number of peregrine falcons. The region is also a popular point of migration for swallows, who inhabit the area between mid-April to October. Recently there have been sightings of the lesser spotted woodpecker, which shows promising growth in the area. The cuckoo is regularly seen on the mountain (there is an old local song about the cuckoo on Bodafon Mountain).

Although the name Mynydd Bodafon may refer to the hill itself, it is also the name for the wider geographical area, which is part of the Penrhoslligwy area. Traditionally a Welsh area, many English people have moved there over the last few decades. The area is very popular with tourists, who use it for walking and sometimes fishing. Agriculture is the economy of the area - mainly cattle and sheep.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Melville Richards, Atlas Môn (Llangefni, 1972).

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 53°20′33″N 4°17′53″W / 53.34244°N 4.29812°W / 53.34244; -4.29812