N-SAT-110

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N-SAT-110
JCSAT-7 → JCSAT-110
Superbird-5 → Superbird-D
Names

N-SAT-110 (Nov 1998 onward) JCSAT-7 (Nov 1998 to Oct 2000) Superbird-5 (Nov 1998 to Oct 2000) JCSAT-110 (Oct 2000 onward)

Superbird-D (Oct 2000 onward)
Mission type Communication
Operator SKY Perfect JSAT Group
COSPAR ID 2000-060A
SATCAT № 26559[1]
Website JSAT Official Page
Mission duration 15 years (planned)
Spacecraft properties
Spacecraft N-SAT-110
Bus A2100AX
Manufacturer Lockheed Martin
Launch mass 3,531 kilograms (7,785 lb)
Dry mass 1,669 kilograms (3,680 lb)
Power 8.3 kW
Start of mission
Launch date 6 October 2000, 23:00 (2000-10-06UTC23Z) UTC
Rocket Ariane 44L
Launch site Kourou ELA-2
Contractor Arianespace
Orbital parameters
Regime Geostationary
Longitude 110° East
Transponders
Band 24 × 36 MHz transponders
Bandwidth 864 MHz
TWTA power 120 W

Superbird
← Superbird-B2 Superbird-A2

N-SAT-110, also known as JCSAT-7, JCSAT-110, Superbird-5 and Superbird-D, is a Japanese geostationary communications satellite which was operated by JSAT Corporation and Space Communications Corporation until both companies merged into SKY Perfect JSAT Group in 2008. It is positioned in geostationary orbit at a longitude of 110° East, from where it is used to provide communications services to Japan.[2][3][4]

Satellite description[edit]

The spacecraft was designed and manufactured by Lockheed Martin on the A2100AX satellite bus. It had a launch mass of 3,531 kg (7,785 lb) with a dry mass of 1,669 kilograms (3,680 lb) and a 15 year design life. As most satellites based on the A2100 platform, it uses a 460 N (100 lbf) LEROS-1C LAE for orbit raising.

When stowed for launch, the satellite was 6 m (20 ft) high. Its dual wing solar panels gave a power generation capability of 8.3 kW at the end of its design life, with a span of 26.4 m (87 ft) when deployed.[5][6] With antennas deployed, its width was 8.3 m (27 ft).[2]

Its payload is composed of twenty-four 36MHz Ku band transponders with a TWTA output power of 120 Watts per channel. With its total bandwidth of 864 GHz it is used primarily for multi-channel pay per view business.[7][5][8]

History[edit]

By September 1997, both JCSAT and Space Communications Corporation (SCC) had requested the 110°East position.[9] The Japanese government made both companies share the 110°E position, and thus both made a joint order on November 20, 1998 for N-SAT-110 from Lockheed Martin.[9][10] JCSAT used the JCSAT-7 designation for this satellite, while SCC used Superbird-5.[5]

On October 6, 2000 at 23:01 UTC, an Ariane-42L successfully launched N-SAT-110 to a geostationary transfer orbit from Guiana Space Centre ELA-2.[11] One hour later, at 00:04 UTC, October 7, the first signals from the satellite were successfully received from the Australia ground station.[12] On October 14, 2000, at around 03:00 UTC, N-SAT-110 reached the geostationary orbit.[13] Once it was put in orbit it was renamed as JCSAT-110 by JCSAT and Superbird-D by SCC.[5]

During 2008, JSAT Corporation and Space Communications Corporationmerged into SKY Perfect JSAT Group.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nsat 110". NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive. 27 April 2016. Retrieved 2016-09-08. 
  2. ^ a b "N-SAT-110". SKY Perfect JSAT Group. Archived from the original on 2016-09-08. Retrieved 2016-09-08. 
  3. ^ "Satellite Fleet JSAT". SKY Perfect JSAT Group. Retrieved 2016-08-26. 
  4. ^ "N-SAT-110". Satbeams. Retrieved 2016-09-08. 
  5. ^ a b c d Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-21). "N-SAT 110 (JCSat 110, JCSat 7, Superbird 5 (D))". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  6. ^ "Launch Kit V-133" (PDF) (in French). Arianespace. September 29, 2000. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2004-04-11. Retrieved 2016-09-06. 
  7. ^ a b "Who we are". SSKY Perfect JSAT Group. 2012-08-03. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-09-08. Retrieved 2016-08-02. 
  8. ^ "Main specifications of SUPERBIRD-D". Space Communications Corporation. Archived from the original on 2004-06-04. Retrieved 2016-08-26. 
  9. ^ a b "Superbird". Global Security. Retrieved 2016-07-28. 
  10. ^ "Lockheed Martin Selected to Build A2100 Satellite to Serve Japanese Telecommunications Market". prnewswire.com. Lockheed Martin. November 20, 1998. Archived from the original on 2016-09-08. Retrieved 2016-09-08. 
  11. ^ "Nsat 110". NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive/Orbital Information. 27 April 2016. Retrieved 2016-09-08. 
  12. ^ "Lockheed Martin Selected to Build A2100 Satellite to Serve Japanese Telecommunications Market". Lockheed Martin. October 6, 2000. Archived from the original on 2007-12-18. Retrieved 2016-09-08. 
  13. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Index". Geostationary Orbit Catalog. Jonathan's Space Page. Archived from the original on 2016-09-08. Retrieved 2016-09-08.