NACDA Directors' Cup

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NACDA Directors' Cup
Directors' Cup Logo (2021).jpg
Awarded forThe most successful overall athletic program in each division of collegiate sports.
Presented byNational Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics
History
Most winsNCAA Division I: Stanford Cardinal (25)
NCAA Division II: Grand Valley State Lakers (13)
NCAA Division III: Williams Ephs (23)
NAIA: Azusa Pacific Cougars (8)
NJCAA: Iowa Central Tritons (5)
Most recentNCAA Division I: Texas Longhorns
NCAA Division II: Grand Valley State Lakers
NCAA Division III: Williams Ephs
NAIA: Keiser Seahawks
NJCAA: Iowa Central Tritons
Websitehttps://thedirectorscup.com/

The NACDA Directors' Cup, known for sponsorship reasons as the NACDA Learfield Directors' Cup or simply as the Directors' Cup, is an award given annually by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics to the colleges and universities in the United States with the most success in collegiate athletics. Points for the NACDA Directors' Cup are based on order of finish in various championships sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) or, in the case of Division I Football, media-based polls. A first-place finish in a sport earns 100 points, second place 90 points, third place 85 points, and lesser values for lower finishes.[1] The award originated in 1993 and was presented to NCAA Division I schools only. In 1995 it was extended to Division II, Division III, and NAIA schools as well, then extended further to junior colleges in 2011 based on standings from the NATYCAA Cup.[2][3] Each division receives its own award.

The University of North Carolina won the award in its inaugural year, but then Stanford University won the Division I award for 25 straight years until the streak was broken in 2020–21 by the University of Texas.

In Division II, UC Davis won six of the first eight awards, but its athletic program moved to Division I in 2003 and Grand Valley State won the award the following eight years.

Williams College has had the most success in Division III, having won the award 21 of the 23 times it has been awarded for that division.

The NAIA division was similarly dominated by Simon Fraser University of British Columbia in its early years, but in 2002, SFU transferred several of its sports programs to Canada's college athletics federation, then known as Canadian Interuniversity Sport and now as U Sports. SFU has since become a full member of NCAA Division II. From 2004–05 to 2011–12, Azusa Pacific University assumed the mantle at the NAIA level, winning eight consecutive championships before moving to NCAA Division II in the 2012–13 season. Oklahoma City University has been the most successful school since that year, with three Directors' Cups.

For two year colleges, Iowa Central Community College has been the most successful school, winning five of the nine titles.

The physical award is a Waterford crystal trophy. Prior to 2003, the sponsor of the NACDA Directors' Cup was retail merchandiser Sears, and the award was known as the Sears Cup. Beginning in the 2003–04 season, the sponsor was the United States Sports Academy. In 2007–08, Learfield Sports assumed the sponsorship of the Directors' Cup. Learfield Sports rebranded to Learfield IMG College in 2016 and to simply Learfield in 2021.

Scoring[edit]

See chart for further breakdown of scoring.[1]

  • NCAA Division I: Counts top 19 sports at each school with the following breakdowns:[4]
    • Four of which must be Baseball and Men's Basketball, Women's Basketball and Women's Volleyball
    • The next highest 15 (max.) sports scored for each institution, regardless of gender, will be used in the standings
    • For FBS Football: the top 25 teams are awarded points based on their final rank in the Coaches Poll. 26th place is considered a tie between every non-ranked bowl winner, and the next available rank is considered a tie between every non-ranked bowl loser.
  • NCAA Division II: Counts top 15 sports at each school with the following breakdowns:[4]
    • Four of which must be Men's Basketball, Baseball, Women's Basketball and Volleyball
    • The next highest 11 (max.) sports scored for each institution, regardless of gender, will be used in the standings
  • NCAA Division III: Counts top 18 sports at each school with the following breakdowns:[4]
    • Four of which must be Men's Basketball, Men's Soccer, Women's Basketball and Women's Soccer
    • The next highest 14 (max.) sports scored for each institution, regardless of gender, will be used in the standings
  • NAIA: Counts top 13 sports at each school with the following breakdowns:[4]
    • Four of which must be Men's Basketball, Men's Soccer, Women's Basketball and Women's Volleyball
    • The next highest 9 (max.) sports scored for each institution, regardless of gender, will be used in the standings
  • Junior/Community Colleges: The highest scoring institution in the NATYCAA Cup standings among the NJCAA Scholarship, NJCAA Non-Scholarship, and State Associations divisions will be declared the Directors' Cup winner.[4]

Past scoring system[edit]

From the creation of the award until the 2017–18 season the scoring was as follows:[5]

  • NCAA Division I: Counted up to 20 total sports at each school, with a maximum of 10 sports counted for each gender
  • NCAA Division II: Counted up to 14 total sports at each school, with a maximum of 7 sports counted for each gender
  • NCAA Division III: Counted up to 18 total sports at each school, with a maximum of 9 sports counted for each gender
  • NAIA: Counted up to 12 total sports at each school, with a maximum of 6 sports counted for each gender
  • Junior/Community Colleges: Same as current

Criticism[edit]

The scoring structure has been criticized due to the number of sports counted per division. Although the number of sports counted in the scoring is based on the average number of sports sponsored by a team in that division, certain schools offer many more or many less sports than that. For example, Stanford's dominance at the Division I level is largely attributed to them sponsoring 36 sports teams, the most in Division I outside of the Ivy League, which does not grant athletic scholarships. This gives Stanford many more opportunities to win titles than most other schools, especially considering that many of the sports Stanford sponsors are not played by very many other schools, all but guaranteeing a substantial number of points for the few schools that do.

Multiple suggestions have been made to change the scoring system. Some of the most popular of these include making each sport worth a proportional number of points to the number of schools that compete in it, to get rid of the limit on the number of sports counted then divide a school's total points by the number of sports it sponsors, and to count the median number of teams per division instead of the average (the median number of teams at a Division I school, for example, is 16; substantially lower than the 19 sports that are counted). However, none of these suggestions have ever been seriously considered by NACDA.

Past winners[edit]

  • Results for years and schools shown in italics represent current standings and are not yet final.
  • These results are for the "final" standings, calculated after spring sports end.

NCAA Division I[edit]

Year First Second Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Seventh Eighth Ninth Tenth
1993–94[6] North Carolina Stanford UCLA Florida Penn State Arizona Texas USC Michigan Arizona State
1994–95[7] Stanford North Carolina UCLA Arizona Florida USC Michigan Penn State Nebraska Texas
1995–96[8] Stanford UCLA Florida Texas Michigan North Carolina Arizona Nebraska Penn State USC
1996–97[9] Stanford North Carolina UCLA Nebraska Florida Arizona Texas Ohio State USC LSU
1997–98[10] Stanford (tie) Florida, North Carolina UCLA Michigan Arizona Georgia Washington Nebraska LSU
1998–99[11] Stanford Georgia Penn State Florida UCLA Michigan Duke Virginia (tie) Arizona, USC
1999–2000[12] Stanford UCLA Michigan Penn State North Carolina Nebraska Florida Arizona Texas LSU
2000–01[13] Stanford UCLA Georgia Michigan Arizona Ohio State Florida USC Arizona State Penn State
2001–02[14] Stanford Texas Florida North Carolina UCLA Michigan Minnesota Georgia Arizona State LSU
2002–03[15] Stanford Texas Ohio State Michigan Penn State UCLA Florida North Carolina California Arizona State
2003–04[16] Stanford Michigan UCLA Ohio State Georgia Florida North Carolina Washington California Texas
2004–05[17] Stanford Texas UCLA Michigan Duke Florida Georgia Tennessee North Carolina USC
2005–06[18] Stanford UCLA Texas North Carolina Florida Notre Dame California Duke Georgia USC
2006–07[19] Stanford UCLA North Carolina Michigan USC Florida Tennessee Texas California Arizona State
2007–08[20] Stanford UCLA Michigan Arizona State Texas Florida California LSU Penn State Georgia
2008–09[21] Stanford North Carolina Florida USC Michigan Texas California Virginia LSU Ohio State
2009–10[22] Stanford Florida Virginia UCLA Florida State Texas A&M North Carolina Ohio State California Duke
2010–11[23] Stanford Ohio State California Florida Duke North Carolina Virginia Texas A&M Florida State Oklahoma
2011–12[24] Stanford Florida UCLA Ohio State Florida State Texas USC North Carolina Texas A&M Michigan
2012–13[25] Stanford Florida UCLA Michigan Texas A&M Penn State Oklahoma North Carolina Notre Dame Georgia
2013–14[26] Stanford Florida Notre Dame Virginia Penn State Texas UCLA USC Duke Texas A&M
2014–15[27] Stanford UCLA USC Florida North Carolina Virginia Ohio State Penn State Texas Notre Dame
2015–16[28] Stanford Ohio State Michigan USC Florida UCLA North Carolina Virginia Texas Oregon
2016–17[29] Stanford Ohio State Florida USC North Carolina Michigan Texas Penn State Oregon Kentucky
2017–18[30] Stanford UCLA Florida USC Texas Michigan Ohio State Georgia Florida State Texas A&M
2018–19[31] Stanford Michigan Florida Texas USC UCLA Florida State Virginia Duke North Carolina
2019–20 Not awarded because of the COVID-19 pandemic[32]
2020–21[33] Texas Stanford Michigan North Carolina Florida USC Alabama Arkansas Ohio State Georgia
University Top 10 rankings
Stanford 28
Florida 28
UCLA 23
North Carolina 23
Michigan 22
Texas 22
USC 18

NCAA Division II[edit]

Year First Second Third Fourth Fifth
1995–96 UC Davis Abilene Christian North Dakota State South Dakota State Cal State Bakersfield
1996–97 UC Davis Abilene Christian Cal State Bakersfield Central Oklahoma Indianapolis
1997–98 Cal State Bakersfield UC Davis Abilene Christian Barry Florida Southern
1998–99 Adams State (tie) UC Davis; Abilene Christian (tie) Florida Southern; North Dakota State
1999–2000 UC Davis North Dakota State North Dakota Florida Southern Western State
2000–01 UC Davis North Dakota Cal State Bakersfield UC San Diego Western State
2001–02 UC Davis Grand Valley State UC San Diego Truman State Western State
2002–03 UC Davis Grand Valley State North Florida Cal State Bakersfield South Dakota State
2003–04 Grand Valley State UC San Diego Truman State North Dakota Chico State
2004–05 Grand Valley State Nebraska–Omaha Chico State North Dakota Cal State Bakersfield
2005–06 Grand Valley State Abilene Christian Nebraska–Omaha Southern Illinois Edwardsville Cal State Bakersfield
2006–07 Grand Valley State UC San Diego Abilene Christian Minnesota State Mankato North Dakota
2007–08 Grand Valley State Abilene Christian Minnesota State Mankato UC San Diego Tampa
2008–09 Grand Valley State Minnesota State Mankato Central Missouri Abilene Christian Indianapolis
2009–10 Grand Valley State California (PA) Central Missouri Minnesota State Mankato St. Cloud State
2010–11 Grand Valley State Central Missouri Augustana (SD) Abilene Christian UC San Diego
2011–12 Grand Canyon Grand Valley State Ashland Augustana (SD) Indianapolis
2012–13 Grand Canyon Grand Valley State Ashland Minnesota State Mankato Adams State
2013–14 Grand Valley State West Texas A&M Central Missouri Indianapolis Ashland
2014–15 Grand Valley State Ashland Central Missouri Lewis Minnesota State Mankato
2015–16 Grand Valley State St. Leo UC San Diego California Baptist Minnesota State Mankato
2016–17 Grand Valley State California Baptist West Florida UC San Diego Queens
2017–18 California Baptist Grand Valley State West Texas A&M St. Leo Florida Southern
2018–19 Grand Valley State UC San Diego West Texas A&M Queens (NC) Indianapolis
2019–20 Not awarded because of the COVID-19 pandemic[32][34]
2020–21

NCAA Division III[edit]

Year First Second Third Fourth Fifth
1995–96 Williams UC San Diego Wisconsin–Oshkosh College of New Jersey Rowan
1996–97 Williams College of New Jersey UC San Diego Emory Wisconsin–Oshkosh
1997–98 UC San Diego (tie) College of New Jersey; Cortland State (tie) Williams; Middlebury
1998–99 Williams Middlebury College of New Jersey Amherst Rowan
1999–2000 Williams UC San Diego College of New Jersey St. Thomas (MN) Middlebury
2000–01 Williams Middlebury College of New Jersey Emory Ithaca
2001–02 Williams Ithaca College of New Jersey Middlebury Emory
2002–03 Williams Emory College of New Jersey Trinity (TX) Washington University (MO)
2003–04 Williams Emory Middlebury College of New Jersey Wisconsin–Stevens Point
2004–05 Williams Middlebury Washington University (MO) Trinity (TX) Wisconsin–Stevens Point
2005–06 Williams College of New Jersey Middlebury Emory Cortland State
2006–07 Williams Middlebury Cortland State Amherst Washington University (MO)
2007–08 Williams Washington University (MO) College of New Jersey Amherst Middlebury
2008–09 Williams Middlebury Amherst Washington University (MO) Cortland State
2009–10 Williams Amherst Washington University (MO) Middlebury Illinois Wesleyan
2010–11 Williams Middlebury Washington University (MO) Amherst Calvin
2011–12 Middlebury Washington University (MO) Williams Amherst Wisconsin–Whitewater
2012–13 Williams Emory Middlebury Wisconsin–Whitewater Washington University (MO)
2013–14 Williams Wisconsin–Whitewater Johns Hopkins Washington University (MO) Amherst
2014–15 Williams Johns Hopkins MIT Washington University (MO) Amherst
2015–16 Williams Washington University (MO) Emory Tufts Middlebury
2016–17 Williams Washington University (MO) Tufts Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Johns Hopkins
2017–18 Williams MIT Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Emory Middlebury
2018–19 Williams Johns Hopkins Washington (MO) Middlebury Emory
2019–20 Not awarded because of the COVID-19 pandemic[32][34]
2020–21

NAIA[edit]

Year First Second Third Fourth Fifth
1995–96 Pacific Lutheran Simon Fraser Mobile Berry Azusa Pacific
1996–97 Simon Fraser Pacific Lutheran Azusa Pacific Mobile Willamette
1997–98 Simon Fraser Mobile Findlay Oklahoma City Puget Sound
1998–99 Simon Fraser Azusa Pacific Life (tie) Oklahoma City; Lindenwood
1999–2000 Simon Fraser Lindenwood Azusa Pacific Mary Oklahoma City
2000–01 Simon Fraser Oklahoma City Azusa Pacific Lindenwood Cumberlands (KY)
2001–02 Oklahoma City Lindenwood Simon Fraser Azusa Pacific Malone
2002–03 Lindenwood Simon Fraser Azusa Pacific Mary Oklahoma City
2003–04 Simon Fraser Azusa Pacific Lindenwood Oklahoma City (tie) Mary; Dickinson State
2004–05 Azusa Pacific Lindenwood Simon Fraser Point Loma Nazarene Mary
2005–06 Azusa Pacific Lindenwood Lindsey Wilson Oklahoma Baptist Simon Fraser
2006–07 Azusa Pacific Lindenwood Concordia (CA) Cedarville Oklahoma Baptist
2007–08 Azusa Pacific Simon Fraser Embry–Riddle Fresno Pacific Concordia (CA)
2008–09 Azusa Pacific Concordia (CA) Lindenwood Fresno Pacific California Baptist
2009–10 Azusa Pacific Simon Fraser Fresno Pacific Concordia (CA) Lindenwood
2010–11 Azusa Pacific Embry–Riddle Shorter Fresno Pacific Lindenwood
2011–12 Azusa Pacific Shorter Embry–Riddle Oklahoma Baptist Lindsey Wilson
2012–13 Oklahoma Baptist Lindsey Wilson Concordia (CA) Embry–Riddle (FL) Olivet Nazarene
2013–14 Grand View Oklahoma City Lindsey Wilson Embry–Riddle Olivet Nazarene
2014–15 Oklahoma Baptist Lindsey Wilson Oklahoma City Wayland Baptist Embry–Riddle
2015–16 Lindsey Wilson Oklahoma Baptist Wayland Baptist Olivet Nazarene Indiana Wesleyan
2016–17 Oklahoma City Lindsey Wilson Keiser Wayland Baptist William Carey
2017–18 Oklahoma City Lindsey Wilson Wayland Baptist Keiser Indiana Wesleyan
2018–19 Oklahoma City William Carey Lindsey Wilson Keiser Indiana Wesleyan
2019–20 Not awarded because of the COVID-19 pandemic[32]
2020–21 Keiser Indiana Tech Indiana Wesleyan Oklahoma City Marian (IN)

Two Year Colleges[edit]

Year First Second Third Fourth Fifth
2011–12[35] Fresno (CA) Mt. San Antonio (CA) Orange Coast (CA) Iowa Central Santa Rosa (CA)
2012–13[36] Gloucester (NJ)[a] Iowa Central Mt. San Antonio (CA) Monroe (NY) Suffolk (NY)
2013–14[37] Iowa Western Mt. San Antonio (CA) Herkimer (NY) Iowa Central Orange Coast (CA)
2014–15[38] Mt. San Antonio (CA) Iowa Central Herkimer (NY) Nassau (NY) Iowa Western
2015–16[39] Iowa Central
2016–17[39] Iowa Central
2017–18[40] Iowa Central Rowan (NJ)[b] Mt. San Antonio (CA) Tyler (TX) Herkimer (NY)
2018–19[41] Iowa Central Suffolk (NY) Barton (KS) Mt. San Antonio (CA) Spokane (WA)
2019–20 Not awarded because of the COVID-19 pandemic[32]
2020–21[42] Iowa Central Iowa Western Barton (KS) Tyler (TX) Cowley (KS)
  1. ^ Now known as Rowan College
  2. ^ Previously Gloucester County College

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Directors' Cup Bracket and Non-Bracket Sports Scoring (PDF)" (PDF). National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Retrieved 2020-01-08.
  2. ^ "About". Learfield IMG College Directors' Cup. 2008-09-29. Retrieved 2021-08-06.
  3. ^ "Daktronics Cup Past Winners". National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Retrieved 2021-08-06.
  4. ^ a b c d e "LEARFIELD Directors' Cup Scoring Structure". National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Retrieved 2021-08-06.
  5. ^ "Clarification - Learfield Directors' Cup Scoring Changes". Archived from the original on 2018-08-30.
  6. ^ "1993-94 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-09-06.
  7. ^ "1994-95 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-09-06.
  8. ^ "1995-96 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-04-17.
  9. ^ "1996-97 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-09-06.
  10. ^ "1997-98 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-09-06.
  11. ^ "1998-99 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-07-17.
  12. ^ "1999-2000 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-07-17.
  13. ^ "2000-01 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-07-17.
  14. ^ "2001-02 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2008-10-06.
  15. ^ "2002-03 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-07-11.
  16. ^ "2003-04 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2021-07-02.
  17. ^ "2004-05 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2021-07-02.
  18. ^ "2005-06 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2021-07-02.
  19. ^ "2006-07 D1 Final Standings". Archived from the original on 2011-06-22.
  20. ^ "2007-08 D1 Final Standings". Archived from the original on 2011-07-18.
  21. ^ "2008-09 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-03-29.
  22. ^ "2009-10 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-03-06.
  23. ^ "2010-11 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-01-08.
  24. ^ "2011-12 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-10-10.
  25. ^ "2012-13 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-03-26.
  26. ^ "2013-14 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-04-19.
  27. ^ "2014-15 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-12-08.
  28. ^ "2015-16 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-11-26.
  29. ^ "2016-17 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2021-07-02.
  30. ^ "2017-18 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 31 August 2018.
  31. ^ "2018-19 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2020-11-08. Retrieved 2021-07-02.
  32. ^ a b c d e "Learfield IMG College Directors' Cup Canceled for 2019-20 Season". Archived from the original on 2021-07-12.
  33. ^ "2020-21 D1 Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 July 2021. Retrieved 2 July 2021.
  34. ^ a b "2020-21 Learfield IMG College Directors' Cup Update". National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Retrieved 2021-11-16.
  35. ^ "2011-12 Two year college Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2021-07-02.
  36. ^ "2012-13 Two year college Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2021-07-02.
  37. ^ "2013-14 Two year college Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-14.
  38. ^ "2014-15 Two year college Final Standings" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-14.
  39. ^ a b "Daktronics Cup Past Winners". National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Archived from the original on 2021-08-06. Retrieved 2021-08-06.
  40. ^ "2017-18 Two year college Final Standings" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2021-07-02.
  41. ^ "2018-19 Two year college Final Standings". Archived from the original on 2021-07-02.
  42. ^ "Iowa Central CC captures the 2020-21 Two-Year College LEARFIELD Directors' Cup". National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Retrieved 2021-11-16.

External links[edit]