NCAA Bowling Championship

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
NCAA Bowling Championship
NCAA Bowling Championship Logo.jpg
Sport College Bowling
Founded 2004
No. of teams 10
Most recent
champion(s)
Vanderbilt (2)
TV partner(s) ESPNU
Official website NCAA.com

The NCAA Bowling Championship is a sanctioned women's championship in college athletics. Unlike many NCAA sports, only one championship is held each season with teams from Division I, Division II, and Division III competing together. Ten teams, six automatic qualifiers and four at-large selections, are chosen by the NCAA Bowling Committee to compete in the championships. The championship was first held in April 2004.

The most successful team is Nebraska with 5 titles. The reigning champions are Vanderbilt, which won the 2018 title 4 games to 3 against the defending champions McKendree. This is Vanderbilt's second NCAA Bowling Championship.

Nebraska is the only program to qualify for all 15 NCAA Bowling Championships.[1]

Format[edit]

The collegiate bowling season runs from late October through the end of March, and the National Collegiate Women's Bowling Championship is held in April.

Thru 2017[edit]

The format for the championships from 2004-2017 began with qualifying rounds in which each team bowled one five-person regular team game against each of the other seven teams participating in the championship.

Teams would then be seeded for bracket play based on their qualifying rounds win-loss record and then competed in best-of-seven-games Baker matches in a double elimination tournament. In the Baker format, each of the five team members, in order, bowls one frame until a complete (10-frame) game is bowled. A Baker match tied 3½ games to 3½ games after seven games is decided by a tiebreaker, using the Modified Baker format, which takes the scoring from only frames 6 thru 10.[2]

From 2018[edit]

In previous years, all eight participants received at-large bids. Beginning in 2018 the NCAA Women's Bowling Committee will select a field of ten participants. Six teams are automatic qualifiers from the conferences that have been granted an automatic bid, and the other four receive at-large bids. The six conferences that fulfill the criteria to be granted an automatic qualifier are the Division I Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, Northeast Conference, Southland Bowling League, and Southwestern Athletic Conference, plus the Division II Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association and East Coast Conference. Effective with the 2019 championship, the Division III Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference will also meet the criteria to receive an automatic bid.

The ten participants will be ranked and seeded based on the criteria used by the selection committee. The top six seeds will automatically enter the championship bracket.

The four low seed teams will play in on-campus opening round matches to determine the two participants advancing to the eight-team championship bracket. To minimize travel costs, the matchups are determined by geographical proximity rather than seedings.[3]

Qualifying rounds have been eliminated in favor of a seeded double elimination bracket. Each match within the bracket will consist of best-of-three matches using specified formats (five-person regular team matches, Baker total pinfall, and Baker match play).

The championship finals will be a best-of-seven match using Baker match play rules.[4] The tiebreaker rule used through 2017 will still apply to Baker match play in the new format.

Champions[edit]

NCAA National Collegiate Bowling Championship
Year Site Championship
Winner Score Runner-up Individual Games Most Outstanding Player
2004
Details
Emerald Bowl
Houston
Nebraska 4–2 Central Missouri State 170–131, 160–208, 185–190, 239–150, 219–197, 215–173[5][Note 1] Shannon Pluhowsky, Nebraska
2005
Details
Wekiva Lanes
Orlando, Florida
Nebraska 4–2 Central Missouri State 220–210, 247–266, 148–192, 205–190, 190–172, 235–184[6][Note 2] Amanda Burgoyne, Nebraska
2006
Details
Emerald Bowl
Houston
Fairleigh Dickinson 4–1 Alabama A&M 209–165, 148–184, 172–165, 200–179, 196–165[8][Note 3] Lisa Friscioni, Fairleigh Dickinson
2007
Details
Wekiva Lanes
Apopka, Florida
Vanderbilt 4–3 UMES 167–164, 242–166, 154–202, 148–170, 224–180, 178–235, 198–150[9][Note 4] Josie Earnest, Vanderbilt
2008
Details
Thunder Alley
Omaha, Nebraska
UMES 4–2 Arkansas State 179–223, 200–181, 180–182, 217–164, 175–152, 174–170[11][12] Jessica Worsley, UMES
2009
Details
Super Bowl Lanes
Canton, Michigan
Nebraska 4–1 Central Missouri 200–185, 149–198, 201–168, 201–177, 190–135[13] Cassandra Leuthold, Nebraska
2010
Details
Brunswick Zone Carolier Lanes
North Brunswick, New Jersey
Fairleigh Dickinson 4–3 Nebraska 209–167, 202–222, 203–213, 229–192, 201–222, 230–190, 208–174[14] Danielle McEwan, Fairleigh Dickinson
2011
Details
Skore Lanes
Taylor, Michigan
UMES 4–2 Vanderbilt 215–197, 164–193, 201–248, 234–204, 235–166, 192–181[15][16] Kristina Frahm, UMES
2012
Details
Freeway Lanes
Wickliffe, Ohio
UMES 4–2 Fairleigh Dickinson 222–204, 236–215, 167–249, 208–168, 170–223, 203–176[17] T'nia Falbo, UMES
2013
Details
Super Bowl Lanes
Canton, Michigan
Nebraska 4½–2½ Vanderbilt 211–199, 186–197, 156–169, 190–190, 196–189, 202–182, 246–200[18] Liz Kuhlkin, Nebraska
2014
Game of Wickliffe
Wickliffe, Ohio
Sam Houston State 4–2 Nebraska 181-166, 182-187, 193-190, 189-197, 205-191, 195-165[19] Kimi Davidson,
Sam Houston State
2015
Tropicana Lanes
Richmond Heights, Missouri
Nebraska 4–2 Stephen F. Austin 237-232, 178-253, 201-171, 179-188, 205-201, 195-154[20][21] Julia Bond, Nebraska
2016 Brunswick Zone Carolier Lanes
North Brunswick, New Jersey
Stephen F. Austin 4–3 Nebraska 193-205, 238-198, 265-242, 164-227, 196-187, 160-237, 247-192[22] Kiara Grant, Stephen F. Austin
2017
Raising Cane's River Center
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
McKendree 4–0 Nebraska 182-169, 244-192, 224-212, 240-223[23] Breanna Clemmer, McKendree
2018
Tropicana Lanes
Richmond Heights, Missouri
Vanderbilt 4–3 McKendree 224-204, 174-233, 182-193, 233-204, 203-255, 208-205, 220-191[24] Emily Rigney & Katie Stark, Vanderbilt
2019
Game of Wickliffe
Wickliffe, Ohio[25]
2020
Thunderbowl Lanes
Allen Park, Michigan[26]
2021
AMF Pro Lanes
North Kansas City, Missouri[27]
2022
Wayne Webb's Columbus Bowl
Columbus, Ohio[28]

Team titles[edit]

NCAA Bowling Championship is located in the US
Nebraska
Nebraska
UMES
UMES
Fairleigh Dickinson
Fairleigh Dickinson
McKendree
McKendree
Sam Houston State
Sam Houston State
Stephen F. Austin
Stephen F. Austin
Vanderbilt
Vanderbilt
Schools with national championships
Gold pog.svg – 5 championships, Blue pog.svg – 3 championships
Black pog.svg – 2 championships, White pog.svg – 1 championship
Team Titles Year Won
Nebraska 5 2004, 2005, 2009, 2013, 2015
Maryland Eastern Shore 3 2008, 2011, 2012
Fairleigh Dickinson 2 2006, 2010
Vanderbilt 2 2007, 2018
McKendree 1 2017
Sam Houston State 1 2014
Stephen F. Austin 1 2016

Championship participants[edit]

Source:[29]

School Division Appearances Years Best Result
Alabama A&M I 1 2006 Runners-Up (2006)
Arkansas State I 11 2008, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14, '15, '16, '17, '18 Runners-Up (2008)
Bethune–Cookman I 2 2005, '06 4th (2005)
Bowie State II 1 2018 1st round (2018)
Central Missouri II 13 2004, '05, '06, '07, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14, '15, '16 Runners-Up (2004, '05, '09)
Delaware State I 2 2009, '10 3rd (2009)
Fairleigh Dickinson I 12 2004, '05, '06, '07, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14, '15, '17 Champions (2006, '10)
Fayetteville State II 1 2005 7th (2005)
Kutztown II 1 2011 5th (2011)
Lincoln Memorial II 1 2018 7th (2018)
Maryland Eastern Shore I 12 2004, '05, '06, '07, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14, '17 Champions (2008, '11, '12)
McKendree II 3 2016, '17, '18 Champions (2017)
Minnesota State Mankato[Note 5] II 2 2007, '08 5th (2008)
Nebraska I 15 2004, 05, '06, '07, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14, '15, '16, '17, '18 Champions (2004, '05, '09, '13, '15)
New Jersey City III 7 2004, '05, '06, '07, '08, '09, '10 3rd (2004, '08, '10)
North Carolina A&T I 2 2016, '18 3rd (2016)
Sacred Heart I 5 2004, '05, '07, '08, '12 5th (2004, '05, '07)
St. Francis (PA) I 1 2018 7th (2018)
Sam Houston State I 7 2011, '13, '14, '15, '16, '17, '18 Champions (2014)
Southern I 1 2004 5th (2004)
Stephen F. Austin I 3 2015, '16, '17 Champions (2016)
Texas Southern I 1 2018 1st round (2018)
Valparaiso I 1 2012 5th (2012)
Vanderbilt I 13 2006, '07, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14, '15, '16, '17, '18 Champions (2007, '18)
Winston-Salem
State
[Note 6]
II 1 2004 7th (2004)
Wisconsin–Whitewater III 3 2013, '14, '15 3rd (2014, '15)

NCAA Programs[edit]

A total of 80 teams are competing in 2017–18, up from 77 in 2016–17:

Conferences[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Nebraska had to win two best-of-seven matchups against Central Missouri State (who advanced to the finals after going undefeated in Friday's double elimination format) to win the first NCAA bowling title. Nebraska won the first match 4-2 (183-176, 168-200, 195-170, 212-212 (60-40), 168-203, 246-195) to force the winner-take-all match.
  2. ^ Under the same double elimination format used in 2004, Nebraska went undefeated, winning three matches on Friday, meaning they only had to win once (out of a possible two best-of-seven matches) against Central Missouri State to win the NCAA Bowling Championship. Nebraska needed only one best-of-seven match-up to win their second straight NCAA Bowling title.[7]
  3. ^ Fairleigh Dickinson (only team undefeated, 3-0 after Friday's double elimination matches) needed only one best-of-seven match (out of a possible two matches) to defeat Alabama A&M.
  4. ^ The double elimination format was tweaked in 2007 and subsequently every NCAA Bowling Championships have used this format since. Under the previous double elimination format used from 2004–2006, the finalist with one loss had to defeat the undefeated finalist twice in best-of-seven matches to win the bowling championship. Beginning in 2007, two teams that win two best-of-seven matches advance to the semifinals. In the semifinals, the two undefeated teams would only need to win once out a possible two matches to advance to the final. In the 2007 championships, Vanderbilt and Maryland Eastern Shore won two matches to advance to the semifinals. Both teams only needed one match to advance to the best-of-seven finals match.[10]
  5. ^ Program discontinued in 2011.
  6. ^ Program discontinued in 2014.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Huskers Earn Top Seed in NCAA Championship Field". University of Nebraska Athletics. March 31, 2017. Retrieved March 31, 2017. 
  2. ^ NCAA Bowling Championship Format
  3. ^ "2018 NCAA Women's Bowling Championship Opening Round Match Information and Bid Checklist" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved March 24, 2018. 
  4. ^ "2018 NCAA women's bowling championship field announced". NCAA. March 28, 2018. Retrieved March 29, 2018. 
  5. ^ "Huskers Win NCAA Bowling Title" (Press release). University of Nebraska Athletics. April 10, 2004. 
  6. ^ "Huskers Repeat as National Champions" (Press release). April 16, 2005. 
  7. ^ 2005 NCAA Bowling Bracket
  8. ^ Fairleigh Dickinson Win 2006 NCAA Women’s Bowling Championship
  9. ^ "Vanderbilt Bowlers Make History! Commodores Crowned as NCAA Champs" (Press release). Vanderbilt University Athletics. April 14, 2007. 
  10. ^ 2007 NCAA Women's Bowling Bracket
  11. ^ "National Champions!!!!!" (Press release). University of Maryland Eastern Shore Athletics. April 12, 2008. 
  12. ^ 2008 NCAA Women's Bowling Bracket
  13. ^ "Huskers Capture NCAA Bowling Title" (Press release). University of Nebraska Athletics. April 12, 2009. 
  14. ^ "Fairleigh Dickinson Women's Bowling Wins National Championship" (Press release). Fairleigh Dickinson University Athletics. April 10, 2010. 
  15. ^ "National Champions!" (Press release). University of Maryland Eastern Shore Athletics. April 16, 2011. 
  16. ^ 2011 NCAA Women's Bowling Championship
  17. ^ "Hawks Soar Higher; Win Back to Back NCAA Championships" (Press release). University of Maryland Eastern Shore Athletics. April 15, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Huskers Capture Fourth National Title" (Press release). University of Nebraska Athletics. April 13, 2013. 
  19. ^ Spoor, Mark (April 13, 2014). "Bearkat beginnings" (Press release). NCAA. 
  20. ^ "Huskers Capture Fifth NCAA Title" (Press release). University of Nebraska Athletics. April 11, 2015. 
  21. ^ "SFA Finishes as NCAA National Runner-Up" (Press release). Stephen F. Austin University Athletics. April 11, 2015. 
  22. ^ "NATIONAL CHAMPIONS! Ladyjacks Down Nebraska For Program's First NCAA Title" (Press release). Stephen F. Austin University Athletics. April 16, 2016. 
  23. ^ "NATIONAL CHAMPIONS! McKendree wins 2017 NCAA Women's Bowling Crown" (Press release). McKendree University Athletics. April 15, 2017. 
  24. ^ "Vanderbilt Bowling Upends McKendree for 2018 NCAA Championship". Southland Conference. Retrieved 15 April 2018. 
  25. ^ "MAC Awarded Bid to Host 2019 NCAA Women's Bowling Championship". Mid-American Conference Athletics. Apr 18, 2017. 
  26. ^ "Titans Named Host for Two NCAA Championships, 2021 Men's Tournament Games". Detroit Mercy Titans Athletics. Apr 18, 2017. 
  27. ^ "Jennies Bowling and Kansas City Sports Commission Selected as hosts for 2021 NCAA Bowling Championships". University of Central Missouri Athletics. Apr 18, 2017. 
  28. ^ "Thomas More Chosen to Host 2022 NCAA Women's Bowling Championship". Thomas More College Athletics. Apr 19, 2017. 
  29. ^ "National Collegiate Women's Bowling Championships Record Book" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved September 5, 2017. 

External links[edit]