NCAA Inspiration Award

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The NCAA Inspiration Award is awarded to one of the following who is associated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association: a current or former varsity letter-winner, a coach, or an administrator. The award is given to an individual who "when confronted with a life-altering situation used perseverance, dedication and determination to overcome the event and now serves as a role model to give hope and inspiration to others in similar situations."[1]

The Inspiration Award was first awarded in 2002. The recipients of the award are:

Year Individual Sport College affiliation Ref
2002 Maggie Maloy Track & Cross country Defiance College [2]
2002 Sam Paneno Football University of California, Davis [2]
2003 Diane Geppi-Aikens Lacrosse Loyola College in Maryland [3]
2003 Amanda Walton Field hockey Yale University [4]
2003 Todd Williams Football Florida State University [3]
2004 Heather Denison Volleyball University of Portland [5]
2004 Emily Miller Soccer University of Tennessee at Martin [5]
2004 Mike Nyeholt Swimming University of Southern California [6]
2005 Kaia Jergenson Basketball Lipscomb University [7]
2005 Michelle Thomas Track and field University of Oklahoma [7]
2005 Macharia Yuot Track and field Widener University [7]
2006 Raul Altreche Lacrosse Amherst College [8]
2006 John Doar Basketball Princeton University [8]
2006 Lois Taurman Basketball, Volleyball, & Softball Bellarmine University [8]
2007 David Denniston Swimming Auburn University [9]
2008 Jim MacLaren Football Yale University [10]
2009 Kelly Brush Skiing Middlebury College [11]
2010
2011
2012 Jill Costello[fn 1] Rowing University of California, Berkeley [12]
2012 Louis Zamperini Track and field University of Southern California [13]
2013 David Borden Football Kutztown University of Pennsylvania [14]
2014 Jason Church Football University of Wisconsin–La Crosse [15]
  1. ^ Posthumously

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Inspiration Award Selection Criteria". NCAA.org. Retrieved 2009-01-02. [dead link]
  2. ^ a b "NCAA to honor two recipients with first Inspiration Award". NCAA. December 17, 2001. 
  3. ^ a b "2003 NCAA Inspiration Award Recipients". NCAA. January 6, 2003. Retrieved August 31, 2008. 
  4. ^ "NCAA honors Walton with inspiration award". Yale Daily News (Yale University). January 15, 2003. 
  5. ^ a b "2004 NCAA Award Winners". NCAA.org. January 12, 2004. Retrieved 2009-01-02. 
  6. ^ "Mike Nyeholt To Receive A 2004 NCAA Inspiration Award". University of Southern California Athletic Department. December 18, 2003. 
  7. ^ a b c "NCAA to Honor Three Student-Athletes with 2005 Inspiration Award". NCAA. December 16, 2004. Retrieved January 2, 2009. 
  8. ^ a b c "NCAA award winners turn complication into inspiration". NCAA. December 5, 2005. Retrieved 2009-01-02. [dead link]
  9. ^ "Valor, Inspiration honorees personify courage, selflessness". NCAA. November 6, 2006. Retrieved January 2, 2009. [dead link]
  10. ^ "NCAA Announces Recipients of 2008 Award of Valor and Inspiration Award". NCAA. November 5, 2007. Retrieved January 2, 2009. 
  11. ^ "Injured Middlebury skier receives Inspiration Award". NCAA. November 12, 2008. Retrieved January 2, 2009. [dead link]
  12. ^ "Jill Costello Receives NCAA Inspiration Award". UC Berkeley Athletic Department. October 26, 2011. Retrieved October 17, 2014. 
  13. ^ "From survivor to inspirer — Former USC track star, WWII vet honored with Inspiration Award". NCAA. October 26, 2011. Retrieved October 17, 2014. 
  14. ^ "NCAA award winner inspired to serve". NCAA. October 12, 2012. Retrieved October 17, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Jason Church Named Recipient of 2014 NCAA Inspiration Award". NCAA. October 18, 2013. Retrieved October 17, 2014. 

External Links[edit]