NDUFS7

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NDUFS7
Identifiers
Aliases NDUFS7, CI-20, CI-20KD, MY017, PSST, NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase core subunit S7
External IDs MGI: 1922656 HomoloGene: 11535 GeneCards: NDUFS7
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE NDUFS7 211752 s at fs.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_024407

NM_029272

RefSeq (protein)

NP_077718

NP_083548.1
NP_083548

Location (UCSC) Chr 19: 1.38 – 1.4 Mb Chr 10: 80.25 – 80.26 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]
Wikidata
View/Edit Human View/Edit Mouse

NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur protein 7, mitochondrial, also knowns as NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase 20 kDa subunit, is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the NDUFS7 gene.[3][4] The NDUFS7 protein is a subunit of NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone), which is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane and is the largest of the five complexes of the electron transport chain.[5]

Structure[edit]

The PSST subunit is highly conserved across evolutionary distances. Crystal structures and mutational studies indicate that it is one of the ubiquinone binding sites of Complex I, together with the TYKY (NDUFS8) subunit.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:". 
  2. ^ "Mouse PubMed Reference:". 
  3. ^ Hyslop SJ, Duncan AM, Pitkanen S, Robinson BH (Mar 1997). "Assignment of the PSST subunit gene of human mitochondrial complex I to chromosome 19p13". Genomics. 37 (3): 375–80. doi:10.1006/geno.1996.0572. PMID 8938450. 
  4. ^ "Entrez Gene: NDUFS7 NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 7, 20kDa (NADH-coenzyme Q reductase)". 
  5. ^ Donald Voet; Judith G. Voet; Charlotte W. Pratt (2013). "18". Fundamentals of biochemistry : life at the molecular level (4th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. pp. 581–620. ISBN 9780470547847. 
  6. ^ Angerer H, Nasiri HR, Niedergesäß V, Kerscher S, Schwalbe H, Brandt U (October 2012). "Tracing the tail of ubiquinone in mitochondrial complex I". Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 1817 (10): 1776–84. doi:10.1016/j.bbabio.2012.03.021. PMID 22484275. 

Further reading[edit]