NGC 1255

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NGC 1255
NGC 1255
NGC 1255 (NASA/ESA HST)
Observation data (J2000.0 epoch)
ConstellationFornax
Right ascension 03h 13m 32.04s [1]
Declination−25° 43′ 30.60″ [1]
Redshift0.005624 [1]
Helio radial velocity1686 ± 3 km/s [1]
Distance69 Mly [1]
Apparent magnitude (V)10.7 [2]
Apparent magnitude (B)11.5 [2]
Characteristics
TypeSBbc [2]
Apparent size (V)4.2 x 2.6 [1]
Other designations
PGC 12007, MCG -4-8-50, ESO 481-13

NGC 1255 is a barred spiral galaxy approximately 69 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Fornax.[1]


Observational history[edit]

NGC 1255 (DSS)

NGC 1255 was discovered by American astronomer Edward Emerson Barnard on August 30, 1883 with the 6-inch refractor at Vanderbilt University.[3][4] He described it as a "faint nebula, not large, pretty even in light. A faint star close p and slightly south probably involved. Star is s and f the nebula by about 30'".[3] American astronomer Ormond Stone made an independent discovery in 1886 with the 26" refractor at Leander McCormick Observatory, recording "4.1'x2.0', PA 315°".[3][4]

Supernova SN 1980O[edit]

Supernova SN 1980O of magnitude 17.0 was detected in NGC 1255 on October 30, 1980.[5][6][1] It was discovered by German astronomer Hans-Emil Schuster with the 1.0-m Schmidt telescope.[5][6] The supernova was classified as type II, and it was located at the following coordinates: RA 03h 13m 27s, Dec -25° 44.50′ (J2000 epoch).[1] By December 30, 1980 supernova had faded by about 4 magnitudes and showed strong P-Cyg-type profiles.[5]


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". ned.ipac.caltech.edu. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "Revised NGC Data for NGC 1255". spider.seds.org. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c "Data for NGC 1255". www.astronomy-mall.com. Retrieved December 9, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "New General Catalog Objects: NGC 1500 - 1549". cseligman.com. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  5. ^ a b c "Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams". www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu. Retrieved December 9, 2017.
  6. ^ a b "List of Supernovae". www.cfa.harvard.edu. Retrieved December 9, 2017.

External links[edit]


Coordinates: Sky map 03h 13m 32.04s, -25° 43′ 30.60″