NGC 596

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NGC 596
NGC596 - SDSS DR14.jpg
Elliptical galaxy NGC 596
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
ConstellationCetus
Right ascension 01h 32m 52.1s[1]
Declination−07° 01′ 55″[1]
Redshift1876 ± 11 km/s[1]
Distance67 ±13 Mly (20.6±4.0 Mpc)[1]
Apparent magnitude (V)10.9
Characteristics
TypeE+ pec [1]
Apparent size (V)3′.2 × 2′.1[1]
Other designations
MCG -01-05-005, PGC 5766[1]

NGC 596 is an elliptical galaxy in the constellation Cetus. The galaxy lies 65 million light years away from Earth, which means, given its apparent dimensions, that NGC 596 is approximately 60,000 light years across. The galaxy shows an outer envelope and is a merger remnant. The surface brightness profil is smooth and featureless.[2] The galaxy hosts a supermassive black hole, whose mass is estimated to be 170 million (108.24) .[3]

NGC 596 belongs at the NGC 584 galaxy group, which also includes the galaxies NGC 584, which lies 25 minutes to the northwest,[4] NGC 600, NGC 615 and NGC 636.[5]

The galaxy is included in the Herschel 400 Catalogue. It lies about 2 and half degrees northeast from theta Ceti.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for NGC 596. Retrieved 2017-05-16.
  2. ^ Faber, S. M.; Tremaine, Scott; Ajhar, Edward A.; Byun, Yong-Ik; Dressler, Alan; Gebhardt, Karl; Grillmair, Carl; Kormendy, John; Lauer, Tod R.; Richstone, Douglas (November 1997). "The Centers of Early-Type Galaxies with HST. IV. Central Parameter Relations" (PDF). The Astronomical Journal. 114: 1771. arXiv:astro-ph/9610055. Bibcode:1997AJ....114.1771F. doi:10.1086/118606.
  3. ^ Chen, Xian; Liu, F. K.; Magorrian, John (20 March 2008). "Tidal Disruption of Stellar Objects by Hard Supermassive Black Hole Binaries". The Astrophysical Journal. 676 (1): 54–69. arXiv:0712.0246. Bibcode:2008ApJ...676...54C. doi:10.1086/527412.
  4. ^ O'Meara, Steve (2007). Steve O'Meara's Herschel 400 observing guide : how to find and explore 400 star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies discovered by William and Caroline Herschel. Cambridge: Cambridge university press. p. 304. ISBN 978-0521858939. Retrieved 18 May 2017.
  5. ^ Makarov, Dmitry; Karachentsev, Igor (21 April 2011). "Galaxy groups and clouds in the local (z∼ 0.01) Universe". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 412 (4): 2498–2520. arXiv:1011.6277. Bibcode:2011MNRAS.412.2498M. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.18071.x.
  6. ^ O'Meara, Steve (2007). Steve O'Meara's Herschel 400 observing guide : how to find and explore 400 star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies discovered by William and Caroline Herschel. Cambridge: Cambridge university press. p. 304. ISBN 978-0521858939.

External links[edit]