NGC 7314

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NGC 7314
NGC7314-HST-R814GB450.jpg
NGC 7314 taken from Hubble Space Telescope
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
ConstellationPiscis Austrinus
Right ascension22h 35m 46.19699s[1]
Declination−26° 03′ 01.5740″[1]
Redshift0.004743±0.000020[2]
Helio radial velocity1,427 km/s[3]
Distance54.6 Mly (16.75 Mpc)[3]
Apparent magnitude (V)11.9[4]
Apparent magnitude (B)11.6[3]
Characteristics
TypeSAB(rs)bc[5]
Apparent size (V)4′.37 × 1′.86[6]
Other designations
NGC 7314[7], Arp 14[8], PGC 69253[6]

NGC 7314 is a spiral galaxy located in the southern constellation of Piscis Austrinus. It was discovered by English astronomer John Herschel on July 29, 1834.[9] This is a nearby Seyfert (active) galaxy, located at a distance of approximately 54.6 megalight-years from the Milky Way.[3] Since it appears to have detached spiral arm segments (either from dust lanes or bright star clusters), it was listed in Halton Arp's Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies.[8]

Walter Scott Houston describes its appearance in small telescopes:[10]

Do not let its photographic magnitude of 11.6 scare you off, for it can be seen in a 6-inch telescope as a curiously fuzzy object. But it is small, appearing only 4' by 2'.

The morphological classification of this galaxy is SAB(rs)bc,[5] indicating a spiral galaxy with a weak central bar (SAB), an incomplete ring structure around the bar (rs), and moderately–wound arms (bc). The plane of the galactic disk is inclined by 64° to the line of sight from the Earth, with the major axis aligned along a position angle of 178°.[11] Within the galaxy's core is an active galactic nucleus tentatively classified as a type I Seyfert. The central supermassive black hole has a relatively low mass, estimated as (0.87±0.45)×106 M. The core is a source for X-ray emission that is seen to vary dramatically on time scales as low as hours.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Brown, A. G. A.; et al. (Gaia collaboration) (August 2018). "Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the contents and survey properties". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 616. A1. arXiv:1804.09365. Bibcode:2018A&A...616A...1G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201833051. Gaia DR2 record for this source at VizieR.
  2. ^ de Vaucouleurs, G.; et al. (1991). Third reference catalogue of bright galaxies. 9. New York: Springer-Verlag.
  3. ^ a b c d Tully, R. Brent; et al. (2016). "Cosmicflows-3". The Astronomical Journal. 152 (2): 21. arXiv:1605.01765. Bibcode:2016AJ....152...50T. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/2/50. 50.
  4. ^ "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for NGC 7314. Retrieved 2007-04-21.
  5. ^ a b c Emmanoulopoulos, D.; et al. (August 2016). "Extensive X-ray variability studies of NGC 7314 using long XMM-Newton observations". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 460 (3): 2413–2431. arXiv:1605.03193. Bibcode:2016MNRAS.460.2413E. doi:10.1093/mnras/stw1128.
  6. ^ a b Paturel, G.; et al. (December 2003). "HYPERLEDA. I. Identification and designation of galaxies". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 412: 45–55. Bibcode:2003A&A...412...45P. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20031411.
  7. ^ "NGC 7314". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  8. ^ a b Arp, Halton (1966). Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies. Pasadena, California: California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 5 Jan 2010. (webpage includes PDF link)
  9. ^ Seligman, Courtney. "NGC Objects: NGC 7300 - 7349". Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  10. ^ Houston, Walter Scott (2005). Deep-Sky Wonders. Sky Publishing Corporation. ISBN 978-1-931559-23-2.
  11. ^ García-Gómez, C.; et al. (July 2002). "Analysis of the distribution of HII regions in external galaxies. IV. The new galaxy sample. Position and inclination angles". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 389: 68–83. arXiv:astro-ph/0204231. Bibcode:2002A&A...389...68G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20020460. S2CID 13942721.

External links[edit]


Coordinates: Sky map 22h 35m 46.2s, −26° 03′ 01″