NGC 7752 and NGC 7753

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
NGC 7752 / 7753
N7753s cropped.jpg
NGC 7753 and 7752 (small, below)
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
Constellation Pegasus
Right ascension 23h 46m 58.5s / 23h 47m 04.8s[1]
Declination +29° 27′ 32″ / +29° 29′ 00″[1]
Redshift 5072 ± 5 / 5168 ± 6 km/s[1]
Distance 272 Mly[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) 15.0 / 12.8[1]
Characteristics
Type I0 / SAB(rs)bc[1]
Apparent size (V) 0′.8 × 0′.5 / 3′.3 × 2′.1[1]
Other designations
UGC 12779 / 12780,[1] PGC 72382 / 72387,[1] Arp 86[1]
See also: Galaxy, List of galaxies

NGC 7752 and NGC 7753 are a set of galaxies approximately 272 million light-years away in the constellation Pegasus.

NGC 7753 is the primary galaxy. It is a barred spiral galaxy with a small nucleus. NGC 7752 is the satellite galaxy of NGC 7753. It is a barred lenticular galaxy that is apparently attached to one of NGC 7753's spiral arms, it would resemble the Whirlpool Galaxy (M51A) and its satellite NGC 5195 (M51B).

Supernovae[edit]

The first supernova detected in NGC 7753 was SN 2006A in January 2006.[3] It was followed four months later by SN 2006ch, a Type Ia supernova.[3] In January 2013 another Type Ia supernova, SN 2013Q was detected, and in August 2015 a Type II supernova, SN 2015ae was discovered.[3]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for NGC 7752 / 7753. Retrieved 2006-11-21.
  2. ^ Normandin, George. "NGC 7753 and NGC 7752 (aka Arp 86): Interacting Galaxies". Kopernik Observatory. Archived from the original on 30 June 2015. Retrieved 30 June 2015.
  3. ^ a b c "List of Supernovae". IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. IAU. Retrieved 19 February 2017.

Coordinates: Sky map 23h 46m 58.5s, +29° 27′ 32″