NSA Inspector General Act of 2013

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NSA Inspector General Act
Great Seal of the United States
Full title To require the Director of the National Security Agency and the Inspector General of the National Security Agency to be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, and for other purposes.
Introduced in 113th United States Congress
Introduced on October 30, 2013
Sponsored by Mark Sanford
Number of co-sponsors 33
Legislative history

The NSA Inspector General Act is a proposed bill introduced by Mark Sanford on October 30, 2013. It would "require the Director of the National Security Agency and the Inspector General of the National Security Agency to be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate".[1]

The bill was authored in light of the Global Surveillance Disclosures of 2013. Currently, the Inspector General is appointed by the Director of the NSA. Supporters of the bill argue that this arrangement "curbs their oversight effectiveness because the Director can remove them."[2][2][3][4]

Co-sponsors[edit]

Co-sponsors in the House include Paul Broun, Mick Mulvaney, Alan Grayson, Kerry Bentivolio, Tom Rice, Eleanor Holmes Norton, Thomas Massie, Justin Amash, Trey Gowdy, Jeff Duncan Joe Wilson, and James Sensenbrenner.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Sanford Introduces H.R. 3436: The NSA Inspector General Act of 2013 | Honorable Mark Sanford". Sanford.house.gov. 2013-10-31. Retrieved 2014-01-26. 
  2. ^ a b "Sanford Introduces H.R. 3436: The NSA Inspector General Act of 2013 | Honorable Mark Sanford". Sanford.house.gov. 2013-10-31. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  3. ^ H.R. 3436:
  4. ^ Nov 3, 2013 by David Mark (2013-11-03). "Mark Sanford A Civil Libertarian?". Politix.topix.com. Retrieved 2014-01-26. 

External links[edit]