NUF2

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NUF2
Protein NUF2 PDB 2VE7.png
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe RCSB
Identifiers
Aliases NUF2, CDCA1, CT106, NUF2R, NDC80 kinetochore complex component
External IDs MGI: 1914227 HomoloGene: 40205 GeneCards: NUF2
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_031423
NM_145697

NM_023284

RefSeq (protein)

NP_113611
NP_663735

NP_075773.2
NP_075773

Location (UCSC) Chr 1: 163.27 – 163.36 Mb Chr 1: 169.5 – 169.53 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]
Wikidata
View/Edit Human View/Edit Mouse

Kinetochore protein Nuf2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the NUF2 gene.[3][4][5]

This gene encodes a protein that is highly similar to yeast Nuf2, a component of a conserved protein complex associated with the centromere. Yeast Nuf2 disappears from the centromere during meiotic prophase when centromeres lose their connection to the spindle pole body, and plays a regulatory role in chromosome segregation. The encoded protein is found to be associated with centromeres of mitotic HeLa cells, which suggests that this protein is a functional homolog of yeast Nuf2. Alternatively spliced transcript variants that encode the same protein have been described.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:". 
  2. ^ "Mouse PubMed Reference:". 
  3. ^ Wigge PA, Kilmartin JV (Mar 2001). "The Ndc80p complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains conserved centromere components and has a function in chromosome segregation". J Cell Biol. 152 (2): 349–60. doi:10.1083/jcb.152.2.349. PMC 2199619Freely accessible. PMID 11266451. 
  4. ^ Nabetani A, Koujin T, Tsutsumi C, Haraguchi T, Hiraoka Y (Oct 2001). "A conserved protein, Nuf2, is implicated in connecting the centromere to the spindle during chromosome segregation: a link between the kinetochore function and the spindle checkpoint". Chromosoma. 110 (5): 322–34. doi:10.1007/s004120100153. PMID 11685532. 
  5. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: NUF2 NUF2, NDC80 kinetochore complex component, homolog (S. cerevisiae)". 

Further reading[edit]