Naberezhnaya Tower

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Naberezhnaya Tower
Башня на набережной
БашнянаНабережной2013.jpg
General information
StatusComplete
TypeOffice
Architectural stylePost-modernism
LocationMoscow International Business Center, Moscow, Russia
Coordinates55°44′48″N 37°32′13″E / 55.74667°N 37.53694°E / 55.74667; 37.53694Coordinates: 55°44′48″N 37°32′13″E / 55.74667°N 37.53694°E / 55.74667; 37.53694
Construction started2003
Completed2007
OwnerCity Center Investment B.V.
Height
Antenna spire285 m (935 ft)
RoofTower A: 85 m (279 ft)
Tower B: 127 m (417 ft)
Tower C: 268 m (879 ft)
Technical details
Floor countTower A: 17
Tower B: 27
Tower C: 59
Floor area254,000 m2 (2,730,000 sq ft)
Lifts/elevators45
Design and construction
ArchitectRTKL
Enka Design
DeveloperEnka
Structural engineerThornton-Tomasetti Engineers
Enka Design
Main contractorEnka
References
[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8]

Naberezhnaya Tower (Russian: Башня на Hабережной, tr. Bashnya na Naberezhnoy, literally means Tower on the Embankment) is an office complex composed of two skyscrapers and a high-rise located on plot 10 in the Moscow International Business Center (MIBC) in Moscow, Russia with a total area of 254,000 m2 (2,730,000 sq ft). The buildings are named after the first three letters of the alphabet and from the lowest height to the tallest: the 17-story tall Tower A, the 27-story tall Tower B, and the 59-story tall Tower C. Construction of the complex started in 2003, with Tower A being completed in 2004, Tower B in 2005, and Tower C in 2007.[9][10][11][12][13]

Tower C is the tallest building out of the complex, with a height of 268.4 metres (881 ft) and 59 stories. It is formerly the tallest building in Russia and Europe, surpassing the Triumph Palace, also in Moscow, in August 2007. Tower C was surpassed by its neighboring skyscraper Moscow Tower of the City of Capitals complex as the tallest building in July 2008.[11]

History[edit]

Naberezhnaya Tower from the ground

In the summer of 2003, the Turkish company Enka started construction of the 17-story Tower A, designed by architects Inan Vehbi and Osturk Oljay.[14] Tower A, covering a total area of 39,800 m2 (428,000 sq ft) and standing 85 metres (279 ft), opened on 11 October 2004. Since the Naberezhnaya Tower was divided into three stages, Enka was able to start construction earlier, postponing construction of the tallest building in the complex, Tower C. Tower A became the first building completed in the central area of the MIBC.[15][16] Due to the demand, the developer managed to sell all of available office space 4 months before the opening of Tower A.[17]

Construction of Tower B started in the same year as Tower A. Tower B, covering a total area of 29,202 m2 (314,330 sq ft) and standing 135.7 metres (445 ft), opened in 2006.[10][12] By the beginning of 2007, when the Naberezhnaya Tower was still the only operating complex in the central area of the MIBC, Tower A and Tower B were occupied by about 40 companies, including Alcoa, Citibank, IBM, GE, KPMG, Lucent, and Procter & Gamble. However, tenants faced the underdeveloped infrastructure of the MIBC that was currently under construction and the fact that 7,000 of their workers only have 1200 parking spaces in a 4-level underground parking lot.[18][dead link]

Construction of Tower C started in 2005, way later than Tower A and Tower B. It was completed in 2007. Standing 268.4 metres (881 ft) tall, the 59-story skyscraper surpassed the Triumph Palace, also in Moscow, by four meters as the tallest building in Russia and Europe. Tower C kept its rank until the neighboring Moscow Tower of the City of Capitals complex surpassed it in July 2008 as the tallest in Russia and Europe.[11] The building includes 1,100 m2 (12,000 sq ft) of retail space and 108,000 m2 (1,160,000 sq ft) of leased space.[19]

Possessing its own production base, Enka did not use a loan and built the Naberezhnaya Tower using its own funds.[20][21] The total investment is estimated at $200 million.[15] By the beginning of the Great Recession, almost all the areas in the complex had already been opened.[20]

Construction gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Naberezhnaya Tower B". CTBUH Skyscraper Database.
  2. ^ "Naberezhnaya Tower C". CTBUH Skyscraper Database.
  3. ^ Naberezhnaya Tower at Emporis
  4. ^ "Naberezhnaya Tower A". SkyscraperPage.
  5. ^ "Naberezhnaya Tower B". SkyscraperPage.
  6. ^ "Naberezhnaya Tower C". SkyscraperPage.
  7. ^ Naberezhnaya Tower B at Structurae
  8. ^ Naberezhnaya Tower C at Structurae
  9. ^ GmbH, Emporis. "Naberezhnaya Tower A, Moscow | 200890 | EMPORIS". www.emporis.com. Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  10. ^ a b GmbH, Emporis. "Naberezhnaya Tower B, Moscow | 200889 | EMPORIS". www.emporis.com. Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  11. ^ a b c GmbH, Emporis. "Naberezhnaya Tower C, Moscow | 200888 | EMPORIS". www.emporis.com. Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  12. ^ a b "Naberezhnaya Tower Block B - The Skyscraper Center". www.skyscrapercenter.com. Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  13. ^ "Naberezhnaya Tower Block C - The Skyscraper Center". www.skyscrapercenter.com. Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  14. ^ "ПАО «СИТИ» | Управляющая компания ММДЦ «Москва-Сити»". citymoscow.ru. Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  15. ^ a b "Башенные деньги". Журнал "Коммерсантъ Деньги". 2016-10-10. p. 22. Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  16. ^ Ведомости (2004-10-12). "В "Сити" сдан первый дом". Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  17. ^ Ведомости (2008-09-29). "Точка зрения: Город в городе". Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  18. ^ Дмитрий Людмирский, Юлия Говорун (2007-03-26). "Пешеходный «Сити»". Ведомости. Archived from the original on 2017-03-26.
  19. ^ "Третий брат одной башни". CRE.ru. 2008-06-16. Archived from the original on 2017-08-02. Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  20. ^ a b "На смену". 2008-11-05. Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  21. ^ ""Нафта Москва" собирает на Eurasia Tower". Газета "Коммерсантъ". 2012-07-26. p. 7. Retrieved 2018-06-21.

External links[edit]

Records
Preceded by
Triumph Palace
Tallest Building in Europe
2007—2009
268 m
Succeeded by
City of Capitals
Preceded by
Triumph Palace
Tallest Building in the Former Soviet Union
2007—2009
268 m
Succeeded by
City of Capitals
Preceded by
Triumph Palace
Tallest Building in Russia
2007—2009
268 m
Succeeded by
City of Capitals
Preceded by
Triumph Palace
Tallest Building in Moscow
2007—2009
268 m
Succeeded by
City of Capitals